Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3849612 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 19, 1974
Filing dateAug 1, 1973
Priority dateAug 1, 1973
Publication numberUS 3849612 A, US 3849612A, US-A-3849612, US3849612 A, US3849612A
InventorsCobb J, Schaad W
Original AssigneeIndak Mfg Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vehicular rotary electrical switch assembly with removable,interposed non-conductive plug kill switch means
US 3849612 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Cobb et al.

[ 1 Nov. 19,1974

[ 1 VEHICULAR ROTARY ELECTRICAL SWITCH ASSEMBLY WITH REMOVABLE, INTERPOSED NON-CONDUCTIVE PLUG KILL SWITCH MEANS Inventors: Jesse M. Cobb, Glenview; William J.

Schaad, Winnetka, both of 111.

Assignee: Indak Manufacturing Corp.,

Northbrook, 111.

Filed: Aug. 1, 1973 'Appl. No.: 384,603

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 8/1955 Miller 200/11 C 1/1957 Jacobi 200/11 C 12/1964 Cobb et a]. ZOO/l1 J 2/1970 Schink et a1. 200/11 C Primary Examiner-James R. Scott Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Burmeister, Palmatier & Hamby ABSTRACT Each of the illustrated electrical switches comprises a contactor plate which is rotatable with a carriage in a casing. The contactor plate is biased by resilient means toward a plurality of contact points mounted in one end of the casing opposite the contactor plate. One of the contact points is engageable with a plurality of recesses or undulations in the contactor plate to provide a detaining action whereby the contactor plate is detained in a plurality of angularly spaced positions. Such contact point is in electrical contact with the contactor plate in each of such positions. The contactor plate also has contact segments which are engageable with other contact points as the contactor is rotated. In one embodiment, a pull pin or other stop member is removably mounted in the casing to hold the contactor plate away from one or more contact points in at least one position of the switch. The contactor may have recessed members or undulations which are opposite such contact points. The removal of the stop member releases the contactor plate for movement by the resilient means so as to bring the recessed members ,into engagement with the contact Points T e i y r tst p .ms l stmay be employed as as a safety feature on a snowmobile or other vehicle whereby the pull pin may be connected by means of a cord or the like to the body or clothing of the rider so that the pull pin will be pulled out of the switch if the rider falls off the vehicle. The resulting closure of the switch may be employed to stop the engine of the vehicle.

45 llillii; i i....11lii SHEET 2 OF 4 F261 5 FIG. 6

VEHICULAR ROTARY ELECTRICAL SWITCH ASSEMBLY WITH REMOVABLE, INTERPOSED NON-CONDUCTIVE PLUG KILL SWITCH MEANS This invention relates to electrical switches preferably of the rotary type.

One object of the present invention is to provide rotary electrical switches which will find various applications, but are particularly well adapted for use on snowmobiles or other vehicles.

A further object is to provide new and improved rotary electrical switches which may be employed very advantageously on snowmobiles or other vehicles to provide a kill switch which disables the ignition system of the vehicle engine, a headlight dimmer switch or the like.

Another object is to provide a new and improved rotary switch having a safety feature comprising a removable pull pin or other member which may be connected by means of a cord or the like to the body or clothing of the vehicle operator so that the pin will be pulled from the switch if the operator falls off the vehicle. The removal of the pin causes the switch to operate so as to stop the vehicle.

It is a further object to provide a new and improved rotary switch of the foregoing character in which the safety feature provided by the pull pin is incorporated into a rotary kill switch which may be operated manually to stop the vehicle.

Further objects, advantages and features of the present invention will appear from the following description, taken with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a plan view showing a rotary kill switch to be described as an illustrative embodiment of the present invention, the switch being mounted on the handlebar of a snowmobile or other vehicle.

FIG. 2 is an end view of the handlebar grip taken generally as indicated by the line 22 in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a front view showing the safety pull pin removed from the switch.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged rear view of the switch.

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken generally along the line 55 in FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary view similar to FIG. 5, but showing various components in elevation.

FIG. 7 is a view similar to FIG. 6 with the safety pull pin removed.

FIG. 8 is a section taken generally along the line 88 in FIG. 5.

FIG. 9 is a diagrammatic developed view showing the switch contactor in its RUN position.

FIG. 10 is a view similar to FIG. 9, but showing the contactor in one of its OFF or KILL positions.

FIG. 11 is a view similar to FIG. 9, but showing the effect of removing the pull pin.

FIG. 12 is a front view of the casing of the switch.

FIG. 13 is a rear view of the combined carriage and knob.

FIG. 14 is a front view showing the member which supports the contact points.

FIG. 15 is a front viewof the contactor.

FIG. 16 is a front view of a headlight dimmer switch constituting a modified embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. I7 is a rear view of the headlight dimmer switch.

FIG. 18 is a front view of the contact points and their supporting member employed in the switch of FIG. 16.

FIG. 19 is a front view of the contactor for the switch of FIG. 16.

FIGS. 20 and 21 are diagrammatic developed views showing the two operating positions of the contactor for the switch of FIG. 16.

As just indicated. FIG. I illustrates a preferred embodiment of the present invention in the form of a rotary switch 10 which will find many applications. but is particularly well adapted to serve as a kill switch for a snowmobile or some other vehicle. The kill switch I0 is operative to turn off the engine by inactivating the ignition system. In ths usual arrangement, the kill switch 10 may be operated to short circuit the primary circuit of the magneto employed in the ignition system.

As shown in FIG. 1, the kill switch 10 is adapted to be mounted on the handlebar 12 of the snowmobile or other vehicle. In this case, the switch 10 is incorporated into a grip member 14 adapted to be mounted on the handlebar 12. The grip member 14 also includes a handgrip 16 adapted to be grasped by the operator. Thus, the switch 10 is conveniently positioned for quick and easy operation.

As shown, the kill switch 10 has a rotary knob or handle 18 which can be operated to three positions: a central RUN position, shown in full lines in FIG. 1; and two OFF positions, shown in broken lines. The OFF positions are angularly spaced in opposite directions from the RUN position. With this arrangement, the engine can be stopped by turning the knob 18 in either direction from the RUN position. In this way, no time will be lost in attempting to turn the knob 18 in the wrong direction. This mode of operation is an important safety feature.

The illustrated kill switch 10 has a casing 20, which is adapted to be received in a recess 22 formed between two portions 24 and 26 of the grip member 14. Screws or other fasteners 28 may be employed to fasten the portions 24 and 26 together.

As an added safety feature, the kill switch 10 is provided with a pull pin or other removable member 30 which normally extends into the casing 20 of the switch 10, but may be pulledout of the casing, as shown in FIG. 3. The removal of the pin 30 effectively operates the switch 10 to another OFF position in which the ignition is inactivated.

The pin 30 is provided with a pull cord or other ten sion element 32 which may be connected to the body or the clothing of the operator. In this way, the pin 30 will be pulled out of the switch 10 if the operator falls off the vehicle, or if the vehicle travels away from the operator while he is temporarily dismounted. The removal of the pin 30 causes the engine to stop so that the vehicle will come to a halt. The provision of the pull pin 30 thus makes it possible to prevent accidents which otherwise might occur due to movement of the vehicle without the rider.

The kill switch 10 preferably comprises a contactor 34 (FIGS. 5-8) which is rotatable within the casing 20. Various means may be provided to rotate the contactor 34. In this case, the contactor 34 is mounted on and rotatable with a carriage 36 which is combined with the knob 18.

The contactor 34 is engageable with a plurality of fixed contacts which are mounted in the casing 20, preferably on an end plate or member 38, which may be made of an electrically insulating material, such as suitable plastic. The contact supporting member 38 may be mounted within an opening 40 formed in the rear end of the casing 20. In this case, the casing 20 is also preferably made of a suitable plastic resinous material. The contact supporting member 38 is suitably secured within the opening 40. It is preferred to fasten the member 38 to the casing 20 by ultrasonic welding or heat sealing. However, cement or other fastening means may be employed.

The electrical contacts on the member 38 preferably take the form of a plurality of contact points. In this case, there are three such contact points 41, 42 and 43. However, it will be understoodtthat the arrangement and number of the contact points may be varied. The contact points 41, 42 and 43 project forwardly from the member 38 and into the casing 20.

In this case, electrical leads 42a and 43a are connected to the contact points 42 and 43. A lead may also be connected to the contact point 41, but in this case, no such lead is required.

The contactor 34 may assume various forms, but is illustrated as being generally in the form of a circular plate made of conductive material, such as copper or some other metal. The illustrated contactor 34 is formed with a central, generally circular opening 44 adapted to receive a generally cylindrical shaft portion 46 of the carriage 36. The contactor 34 may have key elements or prongs 48 received in keyways or grooves 50 formed in the shaft portion 46. In this way, the contactor 34 is caused to rotate with the carriage 36.

Various resilient means may be provided to bias the contactor 34 rearwardly toward the contact points 41, 42 and 43. Such resilient means may take the form of at least one spring, illustrated as a single coil spring 52 acting between the carriage 36 and the contactor 34. The illustrated spring 52 is mounted around the shaft member 46 between the contactor 34 and a shoulder 54 on the carriage 36.

The illustrated rotary carriage 36 has an enlarged cylindrical portion 56 extending between the knob 18 and the shaft portion 46. The cylindrical member 56 is rotatably guided within a cylindrical opening 58 in the as shown at 70. The washer 68 and the riveted portion 70 retain the pilot portion 62 within the opening 66.

The contactor 34 is preferably provided with detent elements adapted to cooperate with one or more of the contact points 41-43. By virtue of this detent action, the contactor 34, the carriage 36 and the knob 18 are detained in a plurality of angularly spaced positions. In this case, such detent elements take the form of recesses 72a, 72b and 720 formed in the contactor 34.

As shown to best advantage in the developed views of FIGS. 9, l and 11, the contactor 34 is preferably made of sheet metal so that it is advantageous to form the recesses 72a, 72b and 720 as undulations in the con tactor. The detent recesses are spaced apart by angular casing 20. In this case, the casing 20 is provided with a flexible resilient sealing lip or flange 60 angling inwardly around the outer end of the opening 58. The lip 60 is biased by its own resilience into sealing engagement with the cylindrical member 58. The lip 60 also provides frictional resistance to movement of the cylindrical member 56 and keeps it from rattling. The sealing lip 60 is preferably molded integrally with'the casing 20.

The illustrated carriage 36 is formed with a cylindrical pilot portion 62 projecting rearwardly from the shaft portion 46 along the axis thereof. The pilot portion 62 may be rotatably guided within an opening 64 formed in the contact supporting member 38.

Suitable means may be provided to retain the carriage 36 within the casing 20. In this case, the carriage 36 has a reduced end portion 66 projecting rearwardly from the pilot portion 62. A washer or disc 68 is mounted on the reduced portion 66, which is then upset or riveted by the application of pressure and heat,

intervals corresponding to the desired spacing between the operating positions of the switch. In this case, for example, the detent recesses 72b and 720 are spaced by about 40 from the recess 72a on opposite sides thereof.

It will be seen that the contact point 4] acts as a detent projection to cooperate with the detent recesses 72a, 72b and 720. The contact point 41 is received in the recess 72a when the knob 'lS of the switch is in its RUN position, as shown in FIG. 1. The contact point 41 is received within the recesses 72b and 720 when the switch knob 18 is in its two OFF positions. It will be understood that the contact point 41 is in electrical engagement with the contactor 34 in all three positions of the switch. The spring 52 biases the contactor 34 against the contact point 41 to produce resilient resistance to movement of the contactor between its various positions.

The angular extent to which the knob 18 can be rotated is limited by stop elements which may be provided on the knob and the casing 20. As shown in FIG. 13, the rear portion of the knob 18 may be formed with an inwardly directed stop projection 74 adapted to be engaged with stop shoulders 76-and 78 at the opposite ends of a segmental recess 80 formed in the casing 20.

To produce the desired switching functions, the contactor 34 is provided with one or more contact seg ments or other members which are engageable with the other contact points. In this case, the contactor 34 has three such contact segments 82a, 82b and 82c, which are engageable with the contact points 42 and 43. Recessed members 84a and 84b are formed in the contactor 34 between the contact segments 82a, 82b and 82c. As shown, the recessed members 84a and 84b take the form of undulations in the sheet metal contactor 34.

In the RUN positionof FIGS. 8 and 9, the recessed members 840 and 84b are opposite the contact points 42 and 43 so that the contactor 34 is out of engagement with the contact points 42 and 43. The contactor 34 is held away from the contact points 42 and 43 by stop members 86a and 86b, which might be fixed on the contact supporting member 38,- but in this case are elements of the removable pin or member 30. The stop elements 86a and 86b are preferably made of an electrically insulating material, such as a suitable resinous plastic. As shown, the stop members 86a and 86b are located in the angular interval between the contact points 42 and 43.

In the RUN position of the contactor 34, as shown in FIGS. 8 and 9, the stop elements 86a and 86b are engaged by the contact segment 82b of the contactor 34. The thickness of the stop elements 86a and 86b is such that the recessed members 84a and 84b are held away from the contact points 42 and 43.

If the contactor 34 is rotated to one of its OFF positions, as shown in FIG. 10, the contact segments 82b and 82a are moved into engagement with the contact I points 42 and 43, respectively, so that the contactor 34 is electrically engaged with both contact points. Thus, the contactor 34 forms a closed electrical circuit between the contact points 42 and 43. The contact point 41 now engages the detent recess 72b in the contactor It will be recognized that the contactor 34 can be rotated in the opposite direction so that the contact point 41 will engage the detent recess 720. In that case, the contact segments 82c and 82b on the contactor 34 engage the contact points 42 and 43, respectively. Thus, the contactor 34 forms a closed electrical circuit between the contact points 42 and 43.

It will be understood that the contact points 42 and 43 may be connected to the primary circuit of the ignition magneto so that the closure of the electrical circuit between the contact points 42 and 43 will short circuit the primary circuit. In this way, the magneto will be inactivated so that no spark will be produced by the magneto. Accordingly, the engine will be stopped.

As previously indicated, the electrical leads or wires 42a and 43a may be connected to the contact points 42 and 43. The leads 42a and 43a may extend to the primary circuit of the magneto, or any other circuit which is to be controlled by the switch.

In this case, it is not necessary to connect an electrical lead to the contact point 41, which is in contact with the contactor 34 in all three positions of the contactor. However, in some cases, it may be desired to produce a three-way make in the OFF positions, in which case another electrical lead may be connected to the contact point 41. Such a three-way make is desirable, for example, when there are two magnetos or other devices which need to be inactivated.

As shown in FIG. 3, the stop members 86a and 86b may take the form of tip elements or portions on the removable pin 30. FIG. 11 shows the effect of removing the pin 30 when the contactor 34 is in its RUN position. The stop elements 86a and 86b are no longer present to hold the contactor away from the contact points 42 and 43. Consequently, the force exerted by the resilient means or spring 52 causes the contactor 34 to move toward the contact points 42 and 43 until the recessed members 84a and 84b come into electrical engagement with the contact points 42 and 43. Thus, the contactor 34 completes an electrical circuit between the contact points 42 and 43 so that the engine of the vehicle will be stopped.

In moving against the contact points 42 and 43, the contactor rocks about the pivotal support afforded by the contact point 41 so that the contactor extends at a slight angle to its normal orientation, as will be evident from FIGS. 7 and 11.

It is preferred to provide means for detaining the removable pin 30 against accidental withdrawal from the switch 10. As shown to best advantage in FIGS. 5-7, the pin 30 is adapted to be inserted into the switch through a lateral opening 90 formed between the casing 20 and a segmental member 92 projecting from the contact supporting plate or member 38. It will be seen from FIG. 3 that the stop elements 86a and 86b take the form of prongs on the pin 30. A slot or notch 94 is formed between the prong elements 860 and 8612.

In this case, detent elements or barbs 96a and 96b project laterally from the edges of the prong elements 860 and 86b. These detent elements 960 and 96b are adapted to be detained by ribs 98 on the casing 20 projecting into the opening 90 (FIG. 7). There is sufficient interference between the detent elements 96a and 96b and the ribs 98 to retain the prong elements 860 and 86b in the opening 90 unless considerable force is exerted on the pin 30 to pull it out of the opening. Because of the provision of the slot 94, the prongs 86a and 86b are sufficiently flexible to permit the removal of the pin 30 from the opening 90.

The exterior portion of the pin 30 preferably has a curved flange portion 100 to form a snug closure for the opening 90. A hole 102 may be formed in the exterior portion of the pin 30 to receive the pull cord 32.

It will be seen from FIG. 4 that the segmental member 92 on the contact supporting member 38 is preferably formed with a pair of tongue elements 104 adapted to interlock with grooves 106 on the casing 20. In this way, the casing is reinforced in the neighborhood of the opening 90 into which the pin 30 is inserted.

It will be understood that if the safety pull pin feature is not needed, the stop elements 860 and 86b of FIGS. 9 and 10 may be formed integrally with the contact supporting member 38, as bosses thereon, or may be otherwise secured to the contact supporting member. The opening 90 for the pin 30 may then be omitted. The switch will then operate in the manner described in connection with FIGS. 9 and 10 to provide a RUN position, in which the contactor 34 does not engage the contact points 42 and 43, and two OFF positions, in which the contactor engages the contact points 42 and 43.

It will be understood that various mounting brackets or other devices may be provided to support the switch 10, rather than mounting it between the two parts 24 and 26 of the grip member 14, as shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 5.

As already indicated, various versions of the switch may be produced with a variety of details as to detent arrangements and contact and contactor constructions.

By way of illustration, a modified switch 110 is shown in FIGS. l62l. Many of the components of the switch 110 are the same as already described. To avoid needless repetition of the description, those components of the switch 110, which are the same as previously described, have been given the same reference characters as previously employed so that the previous description can readily be applied to such components. Thus, only the differences between the switch 110 and the previously-described switch 10 will need to be described in detail.

The switch 110 has a knob or handle 118 which is the same as the previously-described knob 18, except that the knob 118 is movable between two positions, designated HIGH BEAM and LOW BEAM in FIG. 16. These legends refer to the fact that the switch 110 is particularly well adapted for use as a headlight dimmer switch on a snowmobile or other vehicle. The switch 110 may employ the same casing 120 as previously described. The switch 110 has a contactor 134 which differs in detail from the previously-described contactor 34. These differences will be described presently.

Likewise, the switch 110 has a contact supporting member or plate 138 which differs in detail from the previously-described member 38. The contact points 41, 42 and 43 may be the same as previously described.

The detent arrangement may be very similar to that previously described. As shown in FIGS. and 21, the contactor 134 has the detent recesses or undulations 72a and 72c as previously described. However, the detent recess 72b is omitted because the contactor 134 has only two operating positions.

To engage the contact points 42 and 43,'the contactor 134 preferably has three contact segments 182a, l82b and 1820, which are differently located but otherwise are the same as the previously-described contact segments 82a, 82b and 82c. Similarly, the contactor 134 has two recessed members or undulations 184a and 184b, which are differently located but otherwise are the same as the recessed members 84a and 84b, previously described.

Instead of the stop elements 86a and 86b, the switch 110 has stop elements 186a and l86b which are fixed to the contact supporting member 138. Preferably, the elements 186a and 186b are formed as integral bosses on the contact supporting member 138.

Instead of the member 92, the contact supporting member 138 is formed with a laterally projecting member 192 which is somewhat larger so as to close the opening 90 in the casing 20. Such opening is not needed because the pull pin is not used.

In this case, the contact point 41 is provided with an electrical lead or wire 141a. The leads 42a and 43a for the contact points 42 and 43 are the same as previously described.

Instead of the inwardly projecting stop 74, the knob 118 is provided with a larger stop 174 (FIG. 16) so as to restrict the rotary movement of the knob 118.

FIGS. 20 and 21 illustrate the operation of the switch 110. In FIG. 20, the contact point 41 is received in the detent recess 72a, and the contact point is in electrical engagement with the contactor 134. The contact segment 182b engages the contact point 42 so that the contactor 134 establishes an electrical circuit between the contact points 41 and 42. On the other hand, the recessed member 18411 is opposite the contact point 43. The contact segment 182a engages the insulating boss or stop 1861), which holds the contactor away from the contact points 43. FIG. 20 represents the HIGH BEAM position of the knob 118.

When the knob is rotated to the LOW BEAM position, as shown in FIG. 21, the contact point 41 is received in the detent recess 720. The contact segment 182!) engages the contact point 43 so that the contactor 134 establishes a closed circuit between the contact points 41 and 43. The recessed member 184a is now opposite the contact point 42. The contact segment 182a engages the insulating boss or stop 186a, which holds the contactor 134 away from the contact point 42.

In both positions of the switch, the contactor 134 has three points of engagement with elements on the stationary supporting member 138 so that the contactor is completely stable, without any tendency to rock. In the position of FIG. 20, the contactor engages the contact points 41 and 42 and the insulating boss or stop 'the contact points 41 and 43 and the stop member 186a. The spring pressure is distributed among these three elements so that positive contact pressure is maintained between the contactor 134 and the contact points 41 and 43.

It will beevident that many versions of the switch may be produced by varying the arrangement of the contact points, the contactor. the detent elements on the contactor, and the stop elements on the contact supporting member. If desired, the stop elements can be replaced with dummy contact points which do not have external electrical connections.

In the switch 10 of FIGS. 115, the contactor 34 has three points of engagement with the fixed elements on the contact supporting member 38, in all operating positions of the switch, as will be evident from FIGS. 9, 10 and 11.

We claim:

1. An electrical switch,

comprising a casing,

a carriage rotatably mounted in said casing,

a contactor plate mounted on one end of said carriage and rotatable therewith,

a plurality of contact points mounted in one end of said casing opposite said contactor plate for engagement by said plate, and

resilient means biasing said contactor plate toward said contact points,

said plate having a first portion conductively engaging a first one of said contact points throughout the range of movement of said contactor plate,

said first portion having a plurality of angularly spaced recesses for receiving said one contact point with a detent action whereby said contactor and said carriage are detained in positions corresponding to the locations of said recesses,

said one contact point and said recesses being smoothly rounded and being of corresponding size such that said one contact point is snugly receivable in each of said recesses with a precise positioning action,

said contactor plate having a contact segment for engaging a second of said contact points in at least one of said positions,

said contactor plate forming a closed electrical circuit between said first and second contact points in at least one of said positions.

2. A switch according to claim 1,

in which said recesses are formed by undulations in said contactor plate.

3. A switch according to claim 1,

in which said one contact point is in electrical engagement with said contactor plate in each of said positions,

said contactor plate forming a closed circuit between said first and second contact points in one of said positions,

said contactor plate forming a closed circuit between said first contact point and a third of said contact points in another of said positions.

4. A switch according to claim 1,

in which said contact points include said first contact point and second and third contact points,

said positions including first and second positions,

said first contact point being in electrical engagement with said contactor plate in both said first and second positions,

said contact segment engaging said second contact point in said first position while engaging said third contact point in said second position.

5. A switch according to claim 1,

in which said contact points include said first contact point and second and third contact points,

said recesses in said contactor plate including first, second and third recesses for receiving said first contact point in first, second and third positions with a detent action,

said first contact point being in electrical engagement with said contactor plate in said first, second and third positions,

said contactor plate having contact segments for engaging said second and third contact points in said second and third positions,

said contactor plate being out of engagement with said second and third contact points in said first position.

6. An electrical switch,

comprising a casing,

a contactor in said casing,

means for rotating said contactor,

a plurality of contact points mounted in said casing opposite said contactor for engagement by said contactor,

resilient means biasing said contactor toward said contact points,

said contactor being rotatable to at least first and second positions,

said contactor having a contacting member for engaging at least one of said contact points in said second position,

said contactor having a recessed member opposite said one contact point in said first position,

and a stop member removably mounted in said casing and engageable with said contactor to hold said recessed member away from said one contact point in said first position,

said stop member being removable from said casing to cause movement of said contactor by said resilient means to bring said recessed member into engagement with said one contact point, whereby removal of said stop member causes closure of an electrical circuit between said contactor and said one contact point.

7. A switch according to claim 6,

in which said stop member takes the form of a removable pull pin,

said casing having an opening for receiving said pull pin.

8. A switch according to claim 7, including a tension member connected to said pull pin for use in removing said pin from said casing.

9. A switch according to claim 6, v

in which said contactor includes a plurality of recessed members,

said contact points including at least two contact points opposite said recessed members when said contactor is in said first position,

said stop member having means engageable by said contactor to hold said recessed members away from said contact points in said first position,

said contactor having contacting means for engaging said contact points when said contactor is in said second position.

10. A switch according to claim 9,

in which said recessed members take the form of undulations in said contactor,

said contacting means taking the form of contact segments on said contactor.

11. A switch according to claim 6,

in which said recessed member takes the form of an undulation in said contactor.

12. A switch according to claim 6,

in which said removable stop member is made of electrically insulating material.

13. A switch according to claim 6,

in which said means for rotating said contactor includes a rotatable carriage in said casing,

said contactor being mounted on said carriage and being rotatable therewith,

said resilient means comprising at least one spring acting between said carriage and said contactor.

14. A switch according to claim 13,

in which said contactor is plate-like in form,

said recessed member taking the form of an undulation in said contactor.

15. A switch according to claim 13,

in which said contactor includes at least two such recessed members in the form of undulations in said contactor,

said contact points including at least two contact points opposite said recessed members when said contactor is in said first position,

said contact member having contact segments for engaging said contact points in said second position,

said removable stop member comprising means engageable by said contactor for holding said recessed members away from said contact points in said first position,

said stop member being removable to cause movement of said contactor by said resilient means to bring said recessed members into engagement with said contact points.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4762968 *Sep 15, 1987Aug 9, 1988David HiltonEmergency cut off device
US5085043 *Jun 1, 1990Feb 4, 1992Black & Decker Inc.Electro-mechanical interlock and module system for lawn mower or other electrical device
US5237133 *Mar 30, 1992Aug 17, 1993Joseph Pollak CorporationSafety ignition switch
USRE36250 *Nov 22, 1993Jul 13, 1999Black & Decker Inc.Electro-mechanical interlock and module system for lawn mower or other electrical device
Classifications
U.S. Classification200/11.00J, 200/43.4, 200/506, 200/291, 200/543, 200/11.00C, 200/61.19
International ClassificationH01H21/00, H01H27/04, H01H21/50, H01H27/00
Cooperative ClassificationH01H27/04, H01H21/50
European ClassificationH01H21/50, H01H27/04