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Publication numberUS3850171 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 26, 1974
Filing dateMay 16, 1973
Priority dateMay 16, 1973
Publication numberUS 3850171 A, US 3850171A, US-A-3850171, US3850171 A, US3850171A
InventorsBall G, Fehr I
Original AssigneeVickers Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Medical face masks
US 3850171 A
Abstract
A medical face mask for supplying gas/air mixture to a patient comprising a hollow body portion adapted to cover the nose and mouth of the patient and an inlet portion for adjustably supplying said gas/air mixture. The body portion includes an inlet opening and at least one outlet. The inlet portion of the mask comprises a venturi throat in communication with the inlet opening in the body portion and includes first and second apertured members, said second member is mounted to the inlet portion and has a plurality of apertures and a gas inlet means. Said first member is rotatably mounted to said second member and has a plurality of apertures adapted for the selective registry with said apertures in said second member.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Ball et al.

[451 Nov. 26, 1974 MEDICAL FACE MASKS [75] Inventors: Graham John Ball; Ivor John Martin Fehr, both of Basingstoke, England [73] Assignee: Vickers Limited, London, England [22] Filed: May 16, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 360,788

[52] US. Cl. 128/203, 128/145.8 [51] Int. Cl A62b 7/02 [58] Field of Search 128/203, 196, 195, 197, 128/199, 200, 205, 209, 210, 142.3, 145.5, 145.8

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 733,026 7/1903 Goldan 128/209 2,508,050 5/1950 Valente 128/205 2,645,223 7/1953 Lawshe et a1 128/173 H 3,186,407 6/1965 Morrison 128/203 3,717,147 2/1973 Flynn 128/145.8

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 471,385 5/1927 Germany 128/203 Primary Examiner-Richard A. Gaudet Assistant Examiner-Henry J. Recla Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Thomas C. Wettach; Arland T. Stein [5 7 ABSTRACT A medical face mask for supplying gas/air mixture to a patient comprising a hollow body portion adapted to cover the nose and mouth of the patient and an inlet portion for adjustably supplying said gas/air mixture. The body portion includes an inlet opening and at least one outlet. The inlet portion of the mask comprises a venturi throat in communication with the inlet opening in the body portion and includes first and sec- -ond apertured members, said second member is mounted to the inlet portion and has a plurality of apertures and a gas inlet means. Said first member is rotatably mounted to said second member and has a plurality of apertures adapted for the selective registry with said apertures in said second member.

5 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures PAH-INTEL HUVZ 61974 SHEET 10F 2 3.850.171 SHEET 20F 2 PATENTEL HUV 26 I974 MEDICAL FACE MASKS For a better understanding of the invention and to show how the same may be carried into effect, reference will now be made, by way of example, to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a front perspective view of a medical face mask,

FIG. 2 is a side view of the mask of FIG. 1 illustrating the various gaseous flows that occur in use, and

FIGS. 3 and 4 are front views of details of the mask of FIGS. 1 and 2.

The mask of the Figures has a hollow body portion 1 formed of a translucent pliable plastics material. The body portion 1 is of appropriate configuration to be fittable to a patients face so as to contain the nose and mouth, the mask being fitted to the patient utilising an elastic cord secured to holes 2 in lugs 3 extending from the rim portion 4 of the body portion 1, this rim portion 4 extending laterally of the remainder of the body portion 1 to facilitate close fitting of the mask to the patients face.

An inlet portion 5 of the mask is formed by a rigid tube 6 that extends from the body portion 1. A disk 7 is fast in the tube 6 at its free end, that is at its end remote from the body portion 1. An inlet jet 8 rigid with the disk 7 extends through the centre of the disk 7 such that a venturi throat exists at the free end of the tube 6. A further disk 9 is rotatably mounted on the jet 8 outside the tube 6, this disk 9 being urged into face to face contact with the disk 7 by a compression spring 10 mounted on the jet 8 and acting between the disk 9 and a shoulder 11 on the jet 8. The outer end of the jet 8 is formed for having connected to it a gas supply pipe.

The two co-operating disks 7 and 9 constitute air inlet means positioned to permit air to be drawn into the mask by the action of gas entering the mask through the venturi throat. To this end, and referring to FIGS. 3 and 4, the disks 7 and 9 are apertured. The disk 7 has four apertures A, B, C and D, equi-angularly spaced-apart on the same pitch circle diameter but of different diameters. In the illustrated example shown the diameters are A 0.1470 inch, B 0.2130 inch, C 0.2130 inch and D 0.28125 inch spaced at 60 apart on a pitch circle diameter of inch. The disk 9 has four corresponding apertures a, b, c and d which, in one position of the disk 9 relative to the disk 7, align with the apertures A, B, C and D respectively. To ensure that air flow through the apertures that are in line with one another is, in most positions of the disk 9 relative to the disk 7, determined by the sizes of the apertures A, B, C and D, the apertures b, c and d are each of slightly larger diameter than the corresponding apertures B, C or D. In the illustrated example a 0.1285 inch, b 0.234375 inch, c 0.28125 inch and d 0.34375 inch in diameter.

In addition to the apertures A, B, C and D the disk 7 is provided with a pip 12 directed towards the disk 9 and disposed on the same pitch circle diameter as the apertures A, B, C and D for engagement with either one of two closed bores 13, 14 in the disk 9 on the same pitch circle diameter as the apertures a, b, c and d and equi-angularly spaced apart therefrom and from each other. In the illustrated example the pip 12 is 0.125 inch in diameter and the bores l3, 14 are each 0.134

inch in diameter. The pip 12 can alternatively be engaged in the aperture a or in the aperture b as discussed below.

The mask is used as follows. The particular example illustrated is intended to have its jet 8 connected to an oxygen source supplying oxygen at a flow rate within the range of 8 to 14 litres per minute, and to operate within acceptable limits up to a flow rate of 19 litres per minute. Oxygen entering the mask through the jet 8 (dotted lines 15 in FIG. 2) causes air to be drawn in through whichever of the apertures in the two disks 7 and 9 are in alignment (chain dot lines 16). The thus oxygen-enriched air enters the mask body portion I to be inhaled by the patient. The length and inner diameter of the tube 6, and the diameter of the orifice of the jet 8, are such that the jet of oxygen entering the tube 6 breaks up within the tube 6 before entering the body portion 1 and the resultant turbulent gas flows within the tube 6 (illustrated in FIG. 2) prevent oxygen not inhaled by the patient, and exhaled air, re-entering the tube 6..The excess oxygen and exhaled air is permitted to leave the mask through apertures 17 in the mask body 1 (chain lines 18). In this illustrated example the t bsfiis 3% n s IQ L 'QLitEE EA aL ELqLS 1 in aildthe jet orifice is 0.144 inch in diameter.

The desired oxygen concentration in the gas stream entering the mask body portion 1 is selected by adjusting the position of the disk 9 relative to the disk 7, percentage concentrations of percent, percent, percent and percent, within i 1 percent at oxygen flow rates of from 8 litres per minute to 14 litres per minute being obtainable with the illustrated mask by setting the disk 9 as follows:

Pip l2 engaged in bore 13, apertures a, b, c and d respectively aligned with apertures A, B, C and D 50 percent oxygen concentration.

Pip l2 engaged in bore 14, apertures b, c and d respectively aligned with apertures A, B and C, apertures a and D blanked off 60 percent oxygen concentration.

Pip 12 engaged in aperture a (blanking this aperture off), apertures c and d aligned with apertures A and B, apertures b, C and D'also blanked off 70 percent oxygen concentration.

Pip l2 engaged in aperture b (blanked off), apertures a and d aligned with apertures D and A, apertures c, B and C also blanked off 80 percent oxygen concentration.

In the last position (80 percent oxygen concentration), although the pip 12 is a very loose fit in the aperture b, the relative sizes of the apertures a and D and d and A are such that the apertures A and a are always open throughout the range of movement permitted to the disk 9 in this position.

It will be appreciated that the various settings described above are obtained by positive locations of the pip 12 in either the bore 13, the bore 14, the aperture a or the aperture b, the setting being altered by withdrawing the disk 9 against the action of the spring 10,

rotating the disk 9 and releasing it again. Appropriate scale markings carried by the disk 9 line up with a fiducial line on the disk 7 for each of these settings.

We claim:

1. A medical face mask comprising a hollow body portion adapted to fit over the nose and mouth of a patient, said body portion having an inlet opening and at least one outlet opening, and an inlet portion including a venturi throat in communication with said inlet opening and having first and second apertured members, said second apertured member being fast with said inlet portion and including a plurality of apertured, said second aperture member including gas inlet means for introduction of a gas into said venturi throat, and said first apertured member being rotatably mounted to said second apertured member'and including a plurality of apertures adapted for registry with selected apertures of said second member to permit selectable amounts of air into said venturi throat.

2. A medical face mask as set forth in claim 1 wherein said apertures in each of said first and second members are disposed on a common pitch circle, said circles each being coaxial about the axis of rotation of said first apertured member and of the same radius as the other.

3. A medical face mask as set forth in claim 1 wherein said first aperture member is rotatably mounted to said gas inlet means, and said gas inlet means-including biasing means for biasing said first member against said second member.

4. A medical face mask as set forth in claim 1 wherein said second aperture member includes at least apertures A, B, C and D and first aperture member includes at least corresponding apertures a, b, c and d, each of said apertures having centers positioned on corresponding pitch circles of the same diameter and said centers being positioned about 60 apart.

5. A medical face mask as set forth in claim 4 wherein apertures b, c and d are each slightly larger than corresponding apertures B, C and D and where the diameters of said apertures are related as follows:

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3977432 *Jan 13, 1975Aug 31, 1976American Hospital Supply CorporationBreathing mask and variable concentration oxygen diluting device therefor
US3995625 *Oct 15, 1974Dec 7, 1976Cyprane LimitedInhalation devices
US4022202 *Oct 22, 1975May 10, 1977William Edward PriceResuscitator inhalator oxygen ventilator
US4037595 *Sep 17, 1975Jul 26, 1977Elam James OBreathing equipment such as resuscitators
US4173977 *Mar 25, 1977Nov 13, 1979Cavitron CorporationAerosol interface
US4919132 *Jun 12, 1989Apr 24, 1990Miser Martin GApparatus for supplying gas to a patient
US5040532 *Mar 3, 1989Aug 20, 1991Alfery David DContinuous positive airway pressure device for thoracic surgery utilizing one-lung anesthesia
US5140982 *Mar 2, 1990Aug 25, 1992Jack BaumanResuscitator
US5144945 *Apr 17, 1990Sep 8, 1992Nippon Sanso Kabushiki KaishaPortable oxygen-enriching air inhaler
US5537998 *Jul 18, 1994Jul 23, 1996Bauman; JackEmergency manual resuscitator with means for detecting air pressure
US5690097 *May 31, 1996Nov 25, 1997Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas SystemCombination anesthetic mask and oxygen transport system
US5944013 *Dec 11, 1998Aug 31, 1999Burch; John M.Resuscitator
US6581594 *May 15, 2000Jun 24, 2003Resmed LimitedRespiratory mask having gas washout vent and gas washout vent for respiratory mask
US6647983 *Mar 6, 2001Nov 18, 2003The Johns Hopkins UniversityLow-pressure valve
US6814075 *Nov 5, 2002Nov 9, 2004Georges BoussignacRespiratory assistance device
US6823865Mar 3, 2003Nov 30, 2004Resmed LimitedRespiratory mask having gas washout vent and gas washout vent assembly for respiratory mask
US7159587Nov 1, 2004Jan 9, 2007Resmed LimitedRespiratory mask having gas washout vent and gas washout vent assembly for respiratory mask
US7559326Jun 18, 2004Jul 14, 2009Resmed LimitedVent and/or diverter assembly for use in breathing apparatus
US7845354Nov 19, 2002Dec 7, 2010Resmed LimitedMask and vent assembly therefor
US7926487Apr 28, 2006Apr 19, 2011Resmed LimitedRespiratory mask having gas washout vent and gas washout vent assembly for a respiratory mask
US7942150Apr 8, 2005May 17, 2011Resmed LimitedNasal assembly
US8122886Dec 27, 2006Feb 28, 2012Resmed LimitedRespiratory mask assembly with vent
US8146596Mar 14, 2008Apr 3, 2012Resmed LimitedVent and/or diverter assembly for use in breathing apparatus
US8251066 *Dec 20, 2005Aug 28, 2012Ric Investments, LlcExhalation port with built-in entrainment valve
US8297285Jul 27, 2007Oct 30, 2012Resmed LimitedDelivery of respiratory therapy
US8528558Mar 15, 2011Sep 10, 2013Resmed LimitedRespiratory mask having washout vent and gas washout vent assembly for a respiratory mask
US8528562Feb 27, 2012Sep 10, 2013Resmed LimitedOxygen diverter valve
US8590533Jun 7, 2011Nov 26, 2013Casey DanfordAdjustable inhalation resistence exercise device
US8678003 *Nov 25, 2004Mar 25, 2014Resmed LimitedVent system for CPAP patient interface used in treatment of sleep disordered breathing
US8757162Nov 2, 2010Jun 24, 2014Resmed LimitedNasal assembly
US8826910Feb 11, 2013Sep 9, 2014Resmed LimitedMask and vent assembly therefor
US8833371Nov 11, 2010Sep 16, 2014Resmed LimitedMask and vent assembly therefor
US20070095350 *Nov 25, 2004May 3, 2007Donald DarkinVent system for cpap patient interface used in treatment of sleep disordered breathing
US20100051034 *Nov 14, 2007Mar 4, 2010Resmed LimitedFrame and vent assembly for mask assembly
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Classifications
U.S. Classification128/204.25, 128/205.11
International ClassificationA61M16/12, A61M16/10, A61M16/06, A62B18/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M2016/127, A62B18/00, A61M16/06
European ClassificationA61M16/06, A62B18/00