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Publication numberUS3850398 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 26, 1974
Filing dateJun 15, 1973
Priority dateJun 15, 1973
Publication numberUS 3850398 A, US 3850398A, US-A-3850398, US3850398 A, US3850398A
InventorsKantor F
Original AssigneeJames D Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adjustable tray
US 3850398 A
Abstract
A tray for horizontally supporting a drink container, and a cooperating clamping assembly for attaching the tray to a tubular chair. The clamping assembly has two hollow cylindrical members, one of which has an end with a perpendicularly inturned flange defining a circular opening having an enlarged cross-section. Rotatably supported within this member is a disc with a transverse slot in one face. This member has an arcuate slot penetrating its wall superjacent the edge of the disc through which the shank of a locking knob passes to threaded engagement with a lock nut seated in an indentation in the side of the disc. When the locking knob is turned in one direction, the nut is drawn against the inner wall of the cylindrical member to lock the disc in position. When the knob is turned in the other direction, the nut is loosened, and the disc can then be rotated within the cylindrical member by shifting of the locking knob. The tray has an integral bayonet lug with a round, flat base segment transversely across the top of which extends a flat latch bar segment with ear-like ends which project beyond the edge of the base segment. When the disc is positioned in one particular way, the bayonet lug can be inserted in the clamping assembly so that its latch bar segment fits into the above-mentioned slot. The disc can then be rotated to another position and locked in place to secure the tray to the clamping assembly.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

ilnited @tates Patent [19 Kantor NOV. 26, 1974 1 ADJUSTABLE TRAY [75] Inventor: Frank J. Kantor, Norco, Calif.

[73] Assignee: David James Corporation, Corona,

Calif.

22 Filed: June 15, 1973 21 App]. No.: 370,209

[52] [1.3. CI 248/225, 248/226 D, 248/230, 248/291 [51] Int. Cl. Fl6m 13/00 [58] Field Of Search 248/122, 225, 226 D, 230, 248/291 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,025,519 5/1912 Dormandy 248/230 2,140,612 12/1938 Zeman 248/291 X 2.995.333 8/1961 Pazzano 248/230 3,588,020 6/1971 Newcomer 248/225 1734,43) 5/1973 WintZ 248/291 X Primary Examiner-William H. Schultz Attorney, Agent, or Firm-John H. Crowe [57] ABSTRACT A tray for horizontally supporting a drink container,

and a cooperating clamping assembly for attaching the tray to a tubular chair. The clamping assembly has two hollow cylindrical members, one of which has an end with a perpendicularly inturned flange defining a circular opening having an enlarged cross-section. Rotatably supported within this member is a disc with a transverse slot in one face. This member has an arcuate slot penetrating its wall superjacent the edge of the disc through which the shank of a locking knob passes to threaded engagement with a lock nut seated in an indentation in the side of the disc. When the locking knob is turned in one direction, the nut is drawn against the inner wall of the cylindrical member to lock the disc in position. When the knob is turned in the other direction, the nut is loosened, and the disc can then be rotated within the cylindrical member by shifting of the locking knob. The tray has an integral bayonet lug with a round, flat base segment transversely across the top of which extends a flat latch bar segment with ear-like ends which project beyond the edge of the base segment. When the disc is positioned in one particular way, the bayonet lug can be inserted in the clamping assembly so that its latch bar segment fits into the above-mentioned slot. The disc can then be rotated to another position and locked in place to secure the tray to the clamping assembly.

10 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PATENTELIISYZBIW 3', 850,398

FIG. 3.' 60' Y ADJUSTABLE TRAY BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to tray-like holders for drinking glasses, beverage mugs, ash trays, and the like, and more particularly to such holders which can be easily mounted on tubular patio chairs, wheel chairs, etc., for convenient use by the chair occupants.

For various reasons, outdoor furniture of the tubular aluminum variety is widely used today on patios, around swimming pools, in backyards, and elsewhere by home owners, motel managers, campground directors, etc. Such furniture is lightweight and extremely useful for outdoor service, during which it is moved from place to place, often out of reach of table tops or other convenient places to put glasses, mugs, bottles, ash trays, etc. This means that the occupant of, for example, a patio chair has no place to set his glass or place an ashtray if he is sipping a drink or smoking, hence must hold the glass or ash tray in his hand continuously or intermittently place it on the deck or ground where it might fall or be knocked over and is inconvenient to reach. When the chair occupant is drinking and smoking at the same time, his difficulties are, of course, compounded. Tubular outdoor furniture has been in popular use for a great many years, and virtually everyone has, at one time or another, used such furniture while attempting to handle a drink of some sort without the aid of a nearby table, bench or other convenient place to put the drink between sips.

In view of the foregoing, it will be clear that there has been a long felt need for some simple, inexpensive, and expedient way of providing the occupants of patio chairs or the like with convenient support for drinks and ash trays as needed. To date no one has, to my knowledge, provided any means precisely suited for this purpose, althoughvarious arrangements for the attachment of dinner trays, and the like, to the arms of chairs and chaise longues have been proposed. Such trays are relatively large, however, and their attachment to the arms of outdoor chairs, while suitable for some purposes, is not particularly suited for drink or ash tray support purposes. For one thing, the position of the tray is generally such as to make it somewhat awkward to move a drinking glass, or the like, on and off of, or use an ash tray on, the tray. For another, the presence of the tray at the chair occupants elbow, or sometimes partially over his lap, as it is when attached to his chair arm, causes the occupant of the chair to feel somewhat hemmed in" which is an uncomfortable sensation for many individuals.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION 1 have now provided, by this invention, a simple and compact device ideally suited for the support ofa drink container and an ash tray closely adjacent the occupant of a tubular patio chair or the like, yet positioned where it will not crowd the chair occupant while permitting him to use it without discomfort or awkwardness. The drink and ash tray supporting device of this invention is removably attachable to a leg, side-brace or other tubular segment of the frame of a patio chair, chaise longue, or equivalent piece of outdoor furniture, and is tiltably adjustable so as to hold the drink container and- /or ash tray in a horizontal position regardless of the angle of the tubular segment of the chair frame to which it is attached or the slope of the surface on which the chair rests. The drink and/or ash tray holder is preferably of molded plastic construction, at least for the most part, and made up of relatively simple parts which can be easily and inexpensively fabricated and assembled, and subsequently installed on a piece of furniture with little or no difficulty by anyone, even one without mechanical aptitude, using only an ordinary screwdriver. The drink and/or ash tray holding device lends itself to attractive packaging and sale at a price low enough so that anyone can afford it, and it is, by virtue of its simplicity of construction and method of assembly, readily movable from one chair to another as desired.

The drink and/or ash tray holder of this invention is, in its preferred form, made up of a relatively small holding tray with a pair of depressions of differing depth, adapted to receive a flanged ash tray or the like and a drink container, and a clamping assembly attachable to a tubular patio chair, or the like, for support of the tray in a position of convenient use by the occupant of the chair. The clamping assembly comprises a pair of generally cylindrical clamp members of equal crosssectional diameter, each having two semicircular notches in one end which cooperate to permit the members to be brought together in embrace of a segment of the frame of said tubular patio chair. The two clamp members are preferably provided with screw fastening means for holding them securely to the tubular chair frame when fitted together around a segment thereof as described. The clamp members are of generally hollow construction and one has a relatively thick, preferably plastic, disc rotatably and coaxially mounted therewithin. The clamp member housing the disc has a pair of diametrically opposite tits on its inner wall positioned to keep said disc at its proper axial location therewithin. The outer (as opposed to semicircularlynotched) end of this member has an inturned flange, perpendicular to its cylindrical wall, which defines a round opening with a transverse, central enlargement adapted to receive a bayonet lug (to be described below) on the holding tray. The face of the aforesaid disc confronting said inturned flange has a relatively wide slot running transversely thereacross, sized for a purpose hereinafter appearing.

Running circumferentially around a portion of the cylindrical wall of the clamp member housing the aforesaid disc is a penetrating slot superjacent the edge of the disc. The disc has a flat-bottomed indentation in its side adapted to seat a square lock nut. The threaded shank of a locking knob (a screw with a knurled head by means of which it can be manually turned) is engageable with the nut through the aforesaid slot in the wall of said clamp member. The disc can be rotatably adjusted within said clamp member by shifting the locking knob back and forth in the slot, and secured in any position of adjustment by turning the knob to tighten said lock nut against the inner wall of the clamp member.

Integral with, and extending laterally outwardly from, the aforesaid holding tray is the above-mentioned bayonet lug. This bayonet lug has a raised base segment of round cross section topped by a flattendd latch bar segment with ear-like ends projecting beyond the edge of the base segment. The latch bar segment of the bayonet lug fits through the central enlargement of the round opening defined by said inturned flange of said clamp member and into the slot in said disc when said central enlargement of said opening overlies said slot. The round base of the bayonet lug is sized to fit rotatably within the reduced portion of the opening so that insertion of the lug through the opening seats it for rotation of the disc in said clamp member, after which the disc can be locked in position by means of the locking knob to anchor the holding tray to the clamping assembly.

It will be apparent from the foregoing that, by virtue of the unique structure and method of functioning of the clamping assembly of this invention, my novel holding tray can be readily attached to the frame ofa tubular patio chair, or the like, and thereafter manually adjusted to a substantially horizontal position for use.

It is thus a principal object of the present invention to provide lightweight support means for a drink and ash tray which can be easily attached to the frame of a tubular patio chair, or the equivalent, in a relatively inconspicuous, out of the way, but conveniently accessible, position for use by the occupant of the chair.

It is another object of the invention to provide such drink and ash tray support means of simple construction, low cost, and attractive appearance.

Another object of the invention is to provide such drink and ash tray support means which can be easily installed for use on a vertical, horizontal, or angled part of the frame of a tubular chair by anyone capable of using an ordinary screwdriver.

Other objects, features and advantages of the invention will become apparent in the light of subsequent disclosures herein.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of a drink and ash tray holding device in accordance with this invention supporting an ash tray in a position of attachment to a vertical part of a tubular chair frame, the chair frame being shown fragmentarily.

FIG. 2 is a bottom view of the drink and ash tray holding device of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a front view of the device.

FIG. 4 is a rear elevation of a tray component of the drink and ash tray holding device disconnected from the remaining part of said device.

FIG. 5 is a front view of a clamping assembly forming a part of the drink and ash tray holding device.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged, exploded view, in perspective, of the FIG. 5 clamping assembly.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENT:

Considering now the drawing in greater detail, with emphasis first on FIG. 1, there is shown generally at T a preferred embodiment of a drink and ash tray holding device in accordance with this invention attached to the tubular frame of a patio chair, the frame being shown fragmentarily at C.

The holding device T has two interlocking parts, namely a drink and ash tray holding tray 12 and a clamping assembly 10, the latter designed to clamp around a part of the tubular chair frame and support the holding tray in a horizontal position for use by a person occupying the chair. The tray 12 is preferably formed from sheet plastic of suitable character for the purpose, and has two side-by-side depressions l4 and 18 depending downwardly from a flat integral top 22. Suitable plastics for the purpose, and available techniques for forming trays and the like therefrom, are well-known to those skilled in the art, hence need not be specifically named or described herein. Depending perpendicularly downwardly from the top 22 of tray 20, at the rear, is a flat wall segment 24 connected to the underside of said top by a gusset 30 as shown in FIG. 2. Depending wall segment 24 has an integral bayonet lug 26 projecting from its outer side for a purpose hereinafter made clear. Bayonet lug 26 has a raised, circular base segment 25 and a latch bar segment 28. The latch bar segment 28 is relatively flat and elongated, having a width substantially less than the diameter of the circular periphery of base segment 25 and a length in excess of this diameter so that its ends extend equidistantly beyond the periphery of the base segment to form a pair of ear-like tabs 27 and 29, as best seen in FIG. 4. A web 20 (see FIGS. 2 and 3) depends downwardly from the underside of the top 22 of holding tray 12 and integrally connects the depressions 14- and 18 at their closest points, to add strength and rigidity to the holding tray structure. Depression 14 is relatively shallow, primarily for purposes of receiving a glass ash tray with an outwardly extending flange around its top sized to nest snugly therewithin, such an ash tray being shown so positioned at 16 in FIG. 1. Depression 14 can, however, be alternatively used to support a drink container, preferably one with a relatively low center of gravity such as a thick-walled mug, in lieu of an ash tray, if desired. The deeper depression 18 can be employed to support a drink container of any of a variety of sizes, including such tall containers as highball glasses, beer bottles, and the like.

Clamping assembly 10 has a pair of substantially hollow, generally cylindrical clamp members 32 and 36, clamp member 32 being longer than the other, and forming the forward part of the clamp assembly, and clamp member 36 being shorter and forming the back of the assembly. Clamp member 36 has a rear closure 38, see FIG. 2, and a pair of aligned semicircular notches 44 in the opposite sides of its cylindrical wall. Clamp members 32 and 36 are of equal cross-sectional diameter, and the forward member 32, like member 36, has a pair of aligned, semicircular notches 70, 71 in its cylindrical wall. The radii of semicircular notches 70, 71 are equivalent, and equal to the radii of notches 44 in clamp member 36. When the two clamp members 32 and 36 are fitted together in axial alignment, with their respective pairs of notches in confronting relationship, these notches form aligned circular openings through the resulting clamp assembly wall. This makes it possible to bring the clamp members together either side of a straight tubular member sized to fit snugly within said circular openings. The framework of conventional lawn and patio chairs is formed largely from aluminum tubing ofa standardized size and I have discovered that clamp members with openings of one-inch diameter easily accomodate this tubing, hence are preferred for purposes of this invention. There is nothing critical about this particular opening size, however, and the clamp members can be made with openings to fit tubing of any desired size within the scope of the invention. FIG. 1 shows the clamp members 32 and 36 fitted together in the described manner in embrace of a vertical section of the frame of the tubular chair C.

The back clamp member 36 is provided with a pair of integral diametrically opposite, smooth-bored cylindrical sockets 68 on its outer wall, these sockets being axially parallel to each other and to the clamp member and sized to admit, in nonthreaded engagment, a pair of identical screws 66, one of which can be seen in FIG. 6, for a purpose hereinafter appearing. The clamp member 32 has a pair of integral, internally threaded sockets 72 and 73 at diametrically opposite positions on its outer wall (see FIG. 2). These sockets are designed to align with the cylindrical sockets 68 of clamp member 36, when the two clamp members are positioned with their semicircular notches in confronting relationship, as shown in FIG. 1, so that the two clamp members can be secured together by means of the screws 66. Thus, as will now be apparent, the clamp members are easily installed for use on the tubular frame of a patio chair or the like by fitting them in position around an appropriate part of the frame, passing screws 66 through the cylindrical sockets 68 and tightening the screws in the threaded sockets 72 and 73.

Clamp member 32 has a cylindrically walled hollow space in its interior, positioned at the forward part of which is a relatively thick disc 34. The disc 34 has a relatively wide, transverse slot 52 in one face, said slot being symmetrical about a diameter of the disc and suitably sized for a purpose hereinafter revealed. The disc 34 is positioned coaxially within clamp member 32, and is of a thickness and diameter to preclude the possibility of tilting misalignment therewithin. The forward end of the clamp member, to the right as seen in FIG. 6, has an integral, inturned flange 46 extending perpendicularly from its cylindrical wall and defining a circular opening 48 interrupted by a pair of symmetrically opposite gaps 74 and 75 which provide a transverse enlargement of the opening for a purpose described below. Set back from the forward face of clamp member 32 is an arcuate slot 50 which penetrates the cylindrical wall of the member for a portion of its circumference and has an axis on a perpendicular crosssectional plane through the clamp member. The disc 34 (sometimes hereinafter referred to as locking disc 34) is positioned just behind the flange 46, which prevents escape of the disc through the forward end of clamp member 32 and is prevented from backward axial migration within said clamp member by a pair of integral projections 76 and 77 on diameterically opposite sides of the internal wall of the clamp member (see FIG. 6). These projections are positioned a sufficient distance from flange 46 to permit the free rotation of disc 34 within clamp member 32, yet prevent movement of the disc from its normal position of rotation to any substantial extent.

The locking disc 34 has a flat-bottomed, flat-sided cut 54 in its edge spaced equiangularly from the ends of slot 52 in its forward face. The cut 54 runs through the disc from front to rear, has sides perpendicular to the faces of the disc, and serves as a seat for a square lock nut 56. The disc, cut 54 and lock nut 56 dimensions are such that the nut fits snugly within the cut and does not extend beyond either face of the disc, or crowd the top of the cut to interfere with free rotation of the disc in clamp member 32, except when tightened as hereinafter described. The nut is threaded to receive the threaded shank 62 of a knurled-head locking knob 60 having a purpose and function soon to be revealed. Just below the position of the threaded opening of the lock nut 56 in the bottom of cut 54 in the locking disc is a smooth-walled socket 64 sized to freely admit the shank 62 of the locking knob 60. When clamp member 32 is properly assembled with the locking disc 34 positioned in the forward part of its hollow interior as described above, the arcuate slot St in its cylindrical wall is positioned intermediate the two faces of the locking disc, the width of the slot being sufficient to freely admit the shank 62 of locking knob 60, but less than the thickness of the locking disc. The locking nut 56 is positioned in the cut 54 in the locking disc, and the shank of the locking knob 60 passes downwardly through this nut (in threaded engagement therewith), then into the nonthreaded socket 64 in the locking disc. A metal washer 58 is positioned around the shank of the locking knob between its knurled head and the outer wall of clamp member 32.

As will now be apparent, the locking disc 34 can be rotatably adjusted within clamp member 32 by movement of the locking knob 60 in slot 50 in the wall of the clamp member. The parts of clamp member 32 are so designed that the slot 52 in the forward face of disc 34 is in axial registry with the enlargement formed by the gaps 74 and 75 in the round opening 48 defined by the flange 46 at the forward end of the clamp member when the shank of the locking knob is at one end of slot 50. These gaps 74 and 75 are of substantially the same width as slot 52 in disc 34, and otherwise dimensioned, along with the circular opening 48 in clamp member 32, to admit bayonet lug 26 so that its latch bar segment 28 fits snugly within slot 52, and its circular base segment is freely rotatable within the circular opening 48. lt will now be apparent that the locking disc 34 can be rotated within the cylindrical shell of clamping member 32 by merely moving the locking knob 60 back and forth within the arcuate slot 50. As will be further apparent, the locking disc can be firmly secured in any position to which it can be rotated by merely turning locking knob 60 in the proper direction to work downwardly through lock nut 56 until further tightening of the locking knob draws the nut firmly against the inner wall of the clamp member shell to squeeze the shell between the nut and the washer 58 bearing on its outer surface. When the nut is thus tightened, the locking disc 34 is held in a fixed position within the clamp member shell from which it can be moved only by first loosening the lock nut to free locking knob 60 for this purpose.

To install the clamping assembly on a piece of tubular furniture for use, the clamp members 32 and 36 are first fitted around a convenient part of the tubular frame, as described above, and fastened in position with the two screws 66. The loosened locking knob 60 is moved to the end of slot 50 in the wall of clamp member 32 at which the slot 52 in disc 34 comes into registry with the enlarged portion of the round opening 48 in the forward end of the clamp member. The bayonet lug 25 is then inserted into the end of clamp member 32 until its latch bar segment is seated in the slot 52. The tray is then adjusted to the horizontal position through movement of the locking knob 60, and the locking knob 60 is tightened. This tray adjustment brings the cars 27 and 29 of the latch bar segment 28 of the bayonet lug at least partially behind flange 46 of clamp member 32, to help interlock the tray and clamping assembly when the locking knob is tightened.

If it is desired to remove the tray from the clamping assembly, this can be accomplished by loosening the locking knob, rotating the disc 34, by means of said locking knob, to the extreme position of the locking knob shank in arcuate slot 50 at which the slot 52 in the forward face of the disc is in registry with the enlarged portion of opening 48 in the forward end of the clamp member, and then slipping the bayonet lug (and tray) out of said clamping assembly. The registry of the slot 52 in disc 34 and the enlarged portion of the opening 48 of clamp member 32 is made to concur with an extreme position of the locking knob shank in arcuate slot 50, as described, to permit easy removal of the tray from the fully assembled apparatus. It is thus a simple matter to remove the tray by merely loosening the locking knob, moving the knob to the appropriate end of the slot 50 for registry of slot 52 and the enlarged portion of opening 48 and withdrawing the tray from the clamping assembly.

The parts making up clamping assembly 10 other than the shank of locking knob 60, lock nut 56, washer 58 and screws 66 are preferably, but not necessarily, of molded plastic construction. The remaining parts of the clamping assembly are preferably, but again not necessarily, of metallic construction.

While the novel drink and/or ash tray holding means of this invention has been herein illustrated and described in what is considered to be a preferred embodiment, there are, as will be appreciated, variations of this embodiment within the scope of the invention. Certain of these variations have already been mentioned, and others will occur to those skilled in the art in the light of present teachings. Examples of the latter result when non-critical changes are made in the shapes of various parts, or features, of the illustrated unit; equivalent materials of construction are substituted for the preferred materials mentioned above; certain structural, or other, features of the unit not critically essential to its proper use and functioning are eliminated; useful, but non-critical, hardware, or other, means are incorporated in the illustrated unit; etc.

While the present disclosure has emphasized the use of my novel unit for the attachment of a drink and/or ash tray holder to the frame of a tubular patio chair or the like, it should be understood that the unit is not necessarily limited to this use, but can be employed in any capacity for which its unique character suits it. For example, the unit can be attached to a wheelchair, or other piece of furniture other than patio furniture, if desired.

In summary, the scope of the present invention extends to all variant forms thereof encompassed by the language of the following claims.

I claim:

1. Holding means comprising, in combination, supported means and a clamping assembly, said clamping assembly being removably attachable to a segment of rigid tubing for support of said supported means near said tubing;

said clamping assembly comprising clamp means adapted to embrace said tubing and associated fastening means for securing said clamp means tightly in place around said tubing;

said supported means having an integral bayonet lug extending laterally outwardly therefrom;

said clamping assembly including an outer shell and an internal member with a slot mounted for reciprocal movement between limits within said shell; said clamping assembly having a receptive hollow for said bayonet lug, the receptive hollow being partially defined by said slot and the character of said reciprocal movement being such as to permit free insertion of said bayonet lug into said receptive hollow in one position of said internal member, after which movement of the internal member within said outer shell causes concurrent movement of the bayonet lug and supported means and consequent interlocking of said supported means and said clamping assembly;

said clamping assembly including associated moving and locking means to permit manual movement of said internal member between said limits, and locking of that member in any position of said move ment within said outer shell;

the parts of said holding means serving to permit installation of said supported means for use near said tubing by attaching said clamping assembly to the tubing and securing it in place thereon with said associated fastening means, assuring adjustment of the position of said internal member so that said receptive hollow can receive said bayonet lug, fully inserting said bayonet lug into said receptive hollow, moving said internal member and said supported means to a desired orientation of the latter and locking said internal member in place by means of said moving and locking means.

2. Holding means in accordance with claim 1 adapted primarily for attachment to a piece of tubular furniture, in which said segment of rigid tubing is a part of the framework of the piece of furniture, said supported means is a drink holding tray, and;

in which said outer shell is of generally cylindrical shape with a generally cylindrical inner wall, said internal member is a disc adapted to fit snugly but rotatably within said shell in coaxial relationship therewith, said disc being sufficiently thick to remain uncanted in said coaxial relationship within said shell;

said slot is a transverse slot in one face of said disc disposed symmetrically about a diameter thereof; and

said shell has integral retaining means for preventing substantial axial migration of said disc from a predetermined position therewithin. 3. Holding means in accordance with claim 2 in which said bayonet lug has a substantially flat base segment of circular periphery and a latch bar segment overlying said base segment and running transversely across a midsection thereof, said latch bar segment being of sufficient length to extend beyond the peripheral edge of said base segment at each end to provide a pair of ear-like extensions therebeyond;

said outer shell has an inturned flange defining a generally circular opening at one end, which generally circular opening is enlarged at diametrically opposite sides to provide access for said latch bar segment of said bayonet lug, and is otherwise adapted to receive said base segment of the bayonet lug in relatively snug fitting but rotatable relationship;

said disc is positioned within said outer shell with said slot facing said inturned flange;

said receptive hollow includes said slot and said generally circular opening and is adapted to receive said bayonet lug when said slot is in registry with the enlarged sides of said opening; and

rotational movement of said disc from said position of registry of its slot with said enlarged sides of said opening when said bayonet lug is positioned within said receptive hollow serves to interengage said bayonet lug and clamping assembly by moving said ear-like extensions at least partially behind said flange.

4. Holding means in accordance with claim 3 in which said outer shell has an axially perpendicular slot through its wall, superjacent the edge of said disc, running part way around said wall, and said moving and locking means comprises a locking knob with a head which can be turned by hand and a threaded shank;

said disc has an indented seat for the retention of a lock nut in its edge;

said moving and locking means includes a lock nut positioned in said seat, said lock nut being threaded to receive the shank of said locking knob and said locking knob being positioned with its shank extending through said perpendicular slot to threaded engagement with said lock nut, in the assembled holding means; and

said disc has a non-threaded, blind socket in the bottom of said seat beneath the center of said lock nut, said socket being sized to receive the outer end of the shank of said locking knob in loosely fitting non-threaded relationship, and said shank being of sufficient length to extend into such socket for a sufficient distance to permit said disc to be rotated between said limits in said shell by the manual shift ing of said locking knob back and forth in said perpendicular slot;

the parts of the assembled holding means cooperating so that said locking knob can be turned by hand to tighten said lock nut against the inner cylindrical wall of said shell to lock said disc in position within the shell or to loosen said lock nut and permit movement of said disc through manual shifting of said locking knob in the above-indicated manner.

5. Holding means in accordance with claim 4 in which said means for preventing substantial axial migration of said disc from its predetermined position within said shell includes said inturned flange at the forward end of said shell and at least two diametrically opposite projections from the inner cylindrical wall of the shell positioned to prevent substantial axial movement of said disc to the rear within said shell.

6. Holding means in accordance with claim 5 in which the registry of the enlarged portion of said substantially circular opening at the forward end of said shell and the slot in the forward face of said disc occurs at an extreme position of rotation of said disc within said shell where the shank of said locking knob abuts one end of said perpendicular slot in the wall of said shell, whereby said registry can be quickly and easily achieved for removal of said tray from said clamping assembly.

7. Holding means in accordance with claim 6 in which said clamp means comprises a pair of hollow, generally cylindrical members of equal diameter, each having a pair of diametrically opposite, semi-circular notches cut in its side wall, the radii of the semi-circular notches being such as to permit said members to be brought together in embrace of said tubing so that their semi-circular notches form circular openings sized to snugly receive the tubing, one of said cylindrical members comprising said outer shell.

8. Holding means in accordance with claim 7 in which said associated fastening means for securing said clamp means tightly in place on said tubing includes a pair of nonthreaded, cylindrical sockets on one of said cylindrical members and a pair of threaded sockets on the second of said members, the positions of said nonthreaded cylindrical and said threaded sockets being such that the sockets fall into respective alignment when the two members are in their positions of embrace of said tubing, and said associated fastening means including, also, a pair of screws adapted to pass through said cylindrical sockets and into threaded engagement with said threaded sockets, when said members are so positioned, the screws being of a length suitable for tightening in said threaded sockets to secure said clamp means tightly in place on said tubing.

9. Holding means in accordance with claim 8 in which said tray has at least one depression adapted particularly, for use as a holding seat for a drink container.

10. Holding means in accordance with claim 9 in which said tray has a relatively deep depression adapted particularly for use as a holding seat for a drink container and a relatively shallow depression adapted particularly for use as a holding seat for an ash tray with an outwardly extending flange around its top.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1025519 *Oct 10, 1911May 7, 1912United Shirt And Collar CompanyElectric-lamp bracket.
US2140612 *Sep 3, 1937Dec 20, 1938Zeman Antoinette WSupport for ashtrays
US2995333 *Nov 28, 1958Aug 8, 1961Pazzano Frederick FDrinking-glass holder and mount
US3588020 *Apr 16, 1969Jun 28, 1971Amerock CorpHand rail bracket assembly
US3734439 *Oct 22, 1971May 22, 1973Aladdin Manuf CoBeverage container receptacle and clamp
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4067527 *Dec 9, 1975Jan 10, 1978Streit James LMusical instrument support stand with counter-balanced, vertically movable horn support rack
US4240129 *Aug 21, 1978Dec 16, 1980Michio KawazoeHolding device for attaching a device such as a camera bracket
US5152489 *Jul 12, 1991Oct 6, 1992C & D EnterprisesRemovable accessory tray for golf bag cart and method therefore
US5597148 *Jun 14, 1995Jan 28, 1997Jeanette M. KaniosCombination wheelchair and beverage container holder for attachment to a vertical support member of a wheelchair
US6243885Aug 12, 1999Jun 12, 2001Gooseneck Enterprises LlcFlush valve mounted beverage holder and associated method
US6320503Sep 21, 2000Nov 20, 2001Vanessa DunnRemote control paging and organizing assembly
US6520465 *Dec 15, 2000Feb 18, 2003Wonderland Nurserygoods Co., Ltd.Rotation and translation bracket
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/222.14, D07/620, 248/231.61, 248/230.5, 248/291.1
International ClassificationA47C7/62
Cooperative ClassificationA47C7/62
European ClassificationA47C7/62