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Publication numberUS3850433 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 26, 1974
Filing dateFeb 7, 1974
Priority dateFeb 7, 1974
Publication numberUS 3850433 A, US 3850433A, US-A-3850433, US3850433 A, US3850433A
InventorsJ Purlia
Original AssigneeJ Purlia
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Board game involving patent transactions
US 3850433 A
Abstract
A board game involving patent transactions including the acquisition of manufacturing plants and inventions related to such plants, obtaining patents on such inventions and the buying, selling and licensing of patents. All of these transactions are determined by a chance device. The complete game comprises a square playing board having a mounting for a double wheel at its center and sections marked off along its marginal portions. One corner section is marked "Home", or the starting point; another corner section is marked "Patent Office Review", while a third corner section is designated "Patent Office". The remaining sections along each margin include one marked "Concept" and another, "Patent Atty.", with the rest of the sections along these margins bearing data identifying a particular manufacturing plant. One section of one marginal side is designated "Patent Auction". The game set also includes: a plurality of search cards, a plurality of concept or invention cards, a plurality of patent cards, playing money, playing pieces, property chips and a set of rules.
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United States Patent Purlia Nov. 26,1974

BOARD GAME INVOLVING PATENT TRANSACTIONS [76] Inventor: John Michael Purlia, 8908 Shelbyville Rd, No. 6, Louisville, Ky. 40222 [22] Filed: Feb. 7, 1974 [21] Appl. No.: 440,344

[52] US. Cl. 273/134 AD, 273/134 C, 273/134 G, 273/134 E, 273/142 E, 273/142 HA [51] Int. Cl. A63f 3/00 [58] Field of Search 273/134 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2.976.044 3/1961' Corpening 273/134 AD 3.163.423 12/1964 Jackson 273/134 AF 3,198,521 8/1965 Kramer et al 273/134 AF 3,807,739 4/l974 Henley et al. 273/134 AF [57] ABSTRACT A board game involving patent transactions including the acquisition of manufacturing plants and inventions related to such plants, obtaining patents on such inventions and the buying, selling and licensing of patents. All of these transactions are determined by a chance device. The complete game comprises a square playing board having a mounting for a double wheel at its center and sections marked off along its marginal portions. One corner section is marked Home, or the starting point; another corner section is marked Patent Office Review, while a third corner section is designated Patent Office. The remaining sections along each margin include one marked Concept and another, Patent Atty., with the rest of the sections along these margins bearing data identifying a particular manufacturing plant. One section of one marginal side is designated Patent Auction. The game set also includes: a plurality of search cards, a plurality of concept or invention cards, a plurality of patent cards, playing money, playing pieces, property chips and a set of rules.

10 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures SEARCH CARD BROADLY PATENTABLE PATENTABILITY LIMITED *FTFWH BOARD GAME INVOLVING PATENT TRANSACTIONS The present invention relates to board games of the Monopoly type, which is disclosed in United States Patent No. 2,026,082, and is concerned primarily with such a game which involves transactions related to inventions, the obtaining of patents thereon and the derivation of financial returns from such patents.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The above identified patent on Monopoly, which issued in 1935, has met with a high degree of public acceptance. Moreover, numerous other board games of this general type have evolved. One such board game has as its underlying theme stock market transactions. Another game of this type deals with the borrowing and lending of money. So far as the applicant is aware, there is no known game of this character which involves transactions having to do with patents. The present invention is founded on the belief that a board game which relates to particular manufacturing plants with inventions which are identified with such plants, the obtaining of patents on such inventions and the derivation of financial returns from such patents will meet with public acceptance.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION With the foregoing conditions in mind, the present invention has in view the following objectives:

1, To provide a board game which is marked off into sections, some of which display data identifying manufacturing plants of a particular character, others of which identify concepts for inventions, each of which is related to one of the manufacturing plants, and others of which identify the office of a patent attorney.

2. To provide a board game of the type noted in which the board is square and the sections are delineated in alignment along the four marginal portions of the board.

3. To provide, in a board game of the character aforesaid, a board which has a corner section marked Home which is the starting point of the game, another corner section marked Patent Office Review and a third corner section designated Patent Office.

4. To provide, in a board game of the kind described, a plurality of concept or invention cards which'correspend in number to the number of manufacturing plant sections displayed on the board, with each concept card identifying an invention related to a particular manufacturing plant.

5. To provide, in a board game of the type noted, a playing board having a mount for a double wheel at its center.

6. To provide, in a board game of the character aforesaid, a double wheel of the roulette wheel type which is removably mounted on the mount therefor and which includes two concentric annular grooves marked off into angular sections by radial dividers, together with a ball in each groove which is movable from one section to others in that groove as the wheel is rotated, together with indicia for each of the angularsections.

7. To provide, in a board game of the kind described, a plurality of search cards, each of which indicates the results of a patentability search.

8. To provide, in a board game of the type noted, a board having a surface marked with an area forreceivranged on the bias, with one being marked Concept ing the concept cards in stacked form and another area for receiving the search cards in a stacked condition.

9. To provide, in a board game of the character aforesaid, a plurality of patent cards, each displaying the title of an invention which corresponds to the title of a concept card, the cost of the patent which is paid to the Patent Office when the invention is broadly patentable, the cost if the invention has only limited patentability, and a fixed royalty when the patent is to be licensed.

10. To provide a board game of the kind described which includes a plurality of playing pieces which are of different colors so that each player is identified by a particular color.

11. To provide, in a board game of the character aforesaid, a plurality of property chips, there being a plurality of chips of the same color as each of the playing pieces so that when a player acquires a manufacturing plant he may attach a property chip of his color to that plant to identify his ownership thereof.

12. To provide, in a board game of the type noted, an adequate supply of playing money which includes simulations of real money of various denominations.

13. To provide, in a board game of the character described, a set of rules under which the game is played.

Various other more detailed objects and advantages of the invention, such as arise in connection with carrying out the above ideas in a practical embodiment, will in part become apparent and in part be hereafter stated as the description of the invention proceeds.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The foregoing objects are achieved by providing a square board of appropriate dimensions which has a playing surface and at the center of which is a mount for a double wheel. The marginal portions of the playing surface are marked off into a plurality of square sections, with the sections of each marginal portion being in alignment. One corner section of the board is marked Home or with some equivalent symbol to indicate the starting point of the game. Another corner section is designated Patent Office Review and a third corner section is designated Patent Office. The sections of each margin include one section marked Concept or with an equivalent term such as Invention, and another section is designated Patent Attorney. The remaining sections along each margin bear designations of particular manufacturing plants, with all of the manufacturing plants being of a different character, with one exception: one section of one margin is designated Patent Auction. Each of the manufacturing plant sections is formed with a groove or slot which removably receives a property chip as will be later described. The playing surface is also marked off into two areas which are ar- Cards and the other, Search Cards.

A plurality of concept or invention cards are provided, there being a concept card for each manufacturing plant and one face of this card will display wording identifying an invention related to a particular manufacturing plant. In play, these cards are stacked with the names of the concepts on the underside and placed on the area therefor. A plurality of search cards are also provided, there being an equal number of cards for four search results. Thus, one group of such cards will display on the face thereof the legend Invention Anticipated. Another group of the same number will be marked Broadly Patentable. A third group of the same number is marked Limited Patentability and a fourth group of the same number is marked Patentability Doubtful. These search cards are stacked with the faces indicating the search results on the underside and placed on the area marked therefor.

The mounting for the double wheel comprises a circular recess depending from the playing surface of the board and from the center thereof upstands a hub with a spindle projecting upwardly from the hub. The wheel which is preferably of a plastic or other material which may be formed into the desired configuration comprises a central inverted cup-shaped member which is fitted over the hub and from which upstands a tubular member that receives the spindle and has an operating member on its upper free end. Integral with the cupshaped member are two confronting conical walls connected by a bottom wall which define an annular groove. This groove is marked off into a plurality of angular sections by radial dividers of a height less than that of the conical walls. An outer annular groove is also provided by a bottom wall extending radially outwardly from the bottom wall of the inner groove and an outer conical wall. This outer annular groove is also divided into angular sections by radial dividers of a height less than that of a groove. A ball is located in each of the annular grooves and is retained therein by a ringlike cover plate which covers both of the grooves. At least one of the angular sections of the outer groove is marked with the designation No Deal and the remaining sections display various figures denoting sums of money which are involved in playing the game according to the rules. The angular sections of the inner groove are marked with large numbers ranging from one to the number of angular sections. Thus, if there are eight sections, as illustrated in the drawing, the numbers 1-8 are displayed in the angular sections of the inner groove. The angular sections of the outer groove display figures indicating certain sums of money and at least one ofthem may be marked No Deal. Sums of money are indicated in the inner groove by three small zeros following each large figure. In playing the game, the wheel is spun by a player at his turn and when the wheel comes to rest the ball in the inner groove determines the number of squares for which that player may move his playing piece. Under certain circumstances, as determined by the rules of the game, the wheel is spun and under certain conditions the position ofthe ball in the outer groove will indicate the sum of money to be transferred in a particular transaction and under other conditions the sum of money displayed by the ball in the inner groove will be controlling.

The game also includes a plurality of playing pieces of different colors. Thus, each player is identified by a particular color. The playing piece of each player is moved alongthe margins of the board in sequential order as determined by the number of sections over which he may move as indicated by the numbers of the sections of the inner groove.

A plurality of property chips are also provided, there being a plurality of chips of a particular color which corresponds to the color of a playing piece. Thus, for each playing piece there is a group of property chips of the same color. When a player acquires a manufacturing plant as determined by the rules of the game, he places one of his property chips in the groove of that manufacturing plant to indicate his ownership thereof.

An adequate supply of playing money is also provided in simulations of $5, $10, $20, $50, $100, $500, $1,000, $5,000 and $10,000. There should be suffcient money to start each player with $l00,000 and afford a surplus for later transactions.

A plurality of patent cards is also provided. There is a patent card for each concept or invention. The patent card displays the title of the invention, the cost of the patent if the invention is broadly patentable and the cost of the patent when the invention embodies only limited patentability, and it displays a fixed royalty that the patentee is to receive when the patent is licensed, as determined by the rules of the game.

The complete game will also include a complete set of rules under which it is to be played. Such rules, of course, are subject to variation within the broad principles on which the game is founded.

For a full and more complete understanding of the invention, reference may be had to the following description and the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of the playing board of the game based on the precepts of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a detailed vertical section taken on an enlarged scale through the central portion of the board and playing wheel, being taken on the plane of the line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a detailed vertical section also on an enlarged scale through one of the sections of the board which identifies a manufacturing plant, being taken on the line 3-3 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a detailed perspective ofa plurality of property chips;

FIG. Sis an elevation ofa group of the playing pieces;

FIG. 6 is a top perspective looking at the playing money in a spread-out condition, with the bills of each denomination assembled in a group;

FIG. 7 is a perspective of the concept cards in a stacked condition, but partially distorted therefrom;

FIG. 8 is a top perspective of the search cards, with the cards of each result assembled in a group and the several groups exploded, and

FIG. 9 is another top perspective of a plurality of the patent cards.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawings wherein like reference characters denote corresponding elements through the several views, and first more particularly to FIG. 1, a playing board is therein illustrated and identified in its entirety by the reference character 10. The board 10 may be of any appropriate material, with a good grade of cardboard being indicated as the preferred material. Briefly referring to FIG. 2, board 10 has a bottom surface 11 and an upper surface 12 which is the playing surface of the board. Board 10 is square and presents side edges 13, l4, l5 and 16. Extending from side edge 13 to side edge 15 are inner lines 17 and 18 which are parallel to side edges 14 and 16 respectively, while additional inner lines 19 and 20 extend between side edges 14 and 16, being parallel to side edges 13 and 15. Lines 13, 14, 17 and 19 define a corner square 21 which is marked with an appropriate designation to indicate the starting point of the game such as the word Home displayed in FIG. 1. Lines 14, l5, l7 and 20 define another corner square 22 which is marked Patent Office Review. Lines 13, 16, 18 and 19 define another corner square 23 which is marked Patent Office, while lines 15, 16, 18 and 20 define the fourth corner square 24 which will be marked to identify a particular manufacturing plant to be later described.

The space between the lines 14 and 17 is divided into eight square sections. Of these eight sections, that identified at 25 bears the designation Concept, that at 26, the title Patent Auction and that at 27 is marked Patent Atty. The remaining five sections along this margin are marked with the designations of particular manufacturing plants, examples of which will be later described.

The space between the lines and is also divided into eight square sections, of which that at 28 is identified as Concept and that at 29, Patent Atty. Similarly, the space between lines 16 and 18 is divided into eight square sections. with that at 30 marked Concept and that at 31 marked Patent Atty. ln a similar manner, the space between the lines 13 and 19 is marked off into eight square sections, with that at 32 being designated Patent Atty., and that at 333, Concept. The remaining sections of the last three margins are identified as manufacturing plants. It will be noted that the squares marked Mfg. Plant in H6. 1 will actually bear the designation of a particular manufacturing plant. Thus, purely by way of example, section 34 will be marked for engine manufacturer. section 35 for auto manufacturer; section 36, cup manufacturer; 37, pen manufacturer; 3%, record producer; 39 protective device producer; 40, tire producer; 41, bandage maker; 42, paper products manufacturer; 43, shoe maker; 44, baby wear manufacturer; 24, clock manufacturer; 45, soap maker; 46, light bulb maker; 47, horticulturist; 48, musical instrument maker; 49, road paving material producer; 50, paint manufacturer; 5i, camera producer; 52, food heater manufacturer; 53, calculating machine producer; 54, cigarette lighter maker; 55, stationery manufacturer; 56, radio products manufacturer.

An area 57 is marked off on what might be called the bias in that it is diagonally disposed, and displays the title Concept Cards. it is intended that a plurality of concept cards in stacked condition be placed on this area 57. Such concept cards are illustrated in FIG. 7, with the entire group being designated 58. it will be understood that each of the concept cards in the stack 58 will identify an invention or concept which is particularly related to one of the manufacturing plants. Thus, purely by way of example, the bottom-most card which is designated 59 would identify the invention as being ajet engine silencer. which would be related to the engine manufacturer" of section 34. Another example is that the uppermost card of stack 58 which is designated 60 would display the concept for a paper clip which would be related to the stationery manufacturer of section 55 ofthe board. To complete the list of inventions, without identifying each particular card, it will be noted that one card will bear the title solar powered automobile. which would relate to the auto manufacturer of section 35. Another card would identify the invention spillproof drinking cup which relates to the cup manufacturer of board section 36.

Another card would be marked neverflll ink pen which would relate to the pen manufacturer of board section 37. Still another concept card would identify an unbreakable phonograph record which relates to the record producer of board section 38. There would be one card marked pickproof lock which relates to the protective device producer of section 39. Another card would be marked wearproof tire which pertains to the tire producer of board section 40. Another card would be marked bandage replacement spray which relates to the bandage maker of section 41. Another card would be marked tearproof paper bag which relates to the paper products manufacturer of board section 42. Another card would bear the designation wearproof shoe which relates to the shoe maker of board section 43. Still another card would be marked disposable diaper which relates to the baby wear manufacturer of board section 44. Another concept would identify an alarm clock which relates to the clock manufacturer of section 24. Another card would identify a soap that wont burn the eyes which relates to the soap maker of board section 45. Another concept card would identify a self generating light bulb which relates to the light bulb maker of board section 46. Another card would identify a synthetic grass seed that produces grass that dowhich relates to the road paving material producer of board section 49. Another card would identify a luminescent paint that pertains to the paint manufacturer of board section 50. Another card would identify a selfdeveloping motion picture camera which relates to the camera producer'of board section 51. Another concept card would identify a heat-and-serve device for frozen foods which relates to the food heater manufacturer of section 52.

Another card would identify an electronic calculator which relates to the calculating machine producer of section 53. Another card would identify a butane cigarette lighter which relates to the cigarette lighter maker of section 54. Another card would identify a radiometer which relates to the radio products manufacturerof board section 56.

Also disposed on the bias of playing surface H2 is an area 61 which displays the title Search Cards. A stack of such searchcards is illustrated in FIG. 8 and designated generally 62. it includes a group of cards 63 which bears the designation Broadly Patentable. Purely by way of example, it may be noted that there may be six of the cards 63. Another group 'of cards 64 bears the legend Anticipated or invention Anticipated. Another group of cards 65 are designated Patentability Limited and still another group 66 bears the designation Patentability Doubtful. There would also be six cards in each of groups 64, 65, and 66.

Referring again to FIG. ll, each of the board sections which bear the designation of a' manufacturing plant is formed with a groove or slot 67 which opens at the upper side thereof preferably adjacent to the marginal edge of that section.

Referring now to H08. 3 and 4, a plurality of property chips are illustrated in H0. 4 and designated 66. These chips 68 are of different colors with each color being the same as that of a playing piece to be later described. lt is intended that each slot 67 be susceptible of receiving one of the playing chips 68 in the manner depicted in FIG. 3. Without here entering into a detailed explanation of the rules of the game it will be noted that each player is provided with a plurality of the playing chips 68 which are the same color as his playing piece and when that player acquires title to a manufacturing plant he places one of these chips 68 in the slot 67 to noticeably call attention to the fact that title to that particular manufacturing plant is vested in that player.

Referring now to FIG. 5, there is therein illustrated a group of playing pieces which are identified in their entirety by the reference character 69. While the number may be varied, it is intended that there be six of such playing pieces, three being replicas of men, and 3, representations of women. Thus, the three pieces 70, 71 and 72 are miniature men and are of different colors as indicated by the shading. Likewise, the pieces 73, 74 and 75 are replicas of women and are also of colors which are not only different from each other but different from the colors of the male pieces.

Referring now more particularly to FIG. 2, board is shown as formed with a recess 76 which is located centrally thereof and which opens onto playing surface 12. Recess 76 is defined by a conical wall 77 and results in the formation of a thin bottom wall 78 of the board from which upstands a central hub 79. Hub 79 defines a bore 80 which is counterbored at 81 and fitted in this bore 80 is the thickened portion 82 of a spindle 83. This thickened portion 82 has a head 84 which is received in the counterbore 81.

A wheel designated generally 85 is preferably made of an appropriate plastic which is readily susceptible of being molded or fashioned into the desired shape and includes a central inverted cup-shaped member 86 which is fitted over hub 79 and is maintained in spaced relation relative thereto by the shoulder between spindle 83 and the thickened portion 82 thereof and the relative diameters of the hub 79 and cup-shaped member 86.

Integrally joined to this cup-shaped member 86 and extending upwardly therefrom is a tubular member 87 having a bore 88 which receives spindle 83. The upper end of tubular member 87 is formed with a knob 89 which functions as a finger engaging member for purposes of spinning wheel 85.

Cup-shaped member 86 presents a conical wall 90 from the lower edge of which extends a bottom wall 91 with a second conical wall 92 upstanding from the outer peripheral edge of bottom wall 91. These walls 90, 91 and 92 define an annular groove 93 which is divided into eight annular sections by radial dividers 94. The upper exposed faces of these angular sections display the large numerals 1-8 as illustrated in FIG. 1, each of which is followed by three small zeros, which, with the figure, indicates sums of money, with each sum being in one of the angular sections. A ball 95 is disposed in annular groove 93 and upon spinning of the wheel 85 is adapted to ride over the dividers 94 which,

it will be noted, are of a height less than that of thegrooves.

Conical wall 92 is formed as part of an annular ridge 96 from the lower edge of which a bottom wall 97 extends radially outwardly to an outer conical wall 98. Ridge 96, bottom 97 and wall 98 define an outer annular groove 99 which is divided into eight angular sections by radial dividers 100. A ball 101 is positioned in this outer groove 99 and upon spinning of the wheel will ride over the dividers 100 as above described in connection with ball 95. A ring-like cover plate 102 closes the grooves 93 and 99 and retains balls and 101 therein. The upper surface of the bottom wall 97 of each angular section of outer groove 99 displays figures denoting a sum of money or the term No Deal as depicted in FIG. 1.

A supply of playing money is illustrated in FIG. 6 and designated generally 103. Purely by way of example, it is shown as comprising: 30 $5 bills in stack 104; 30 $10 bills in stack 105; 60 $20 bills in stack 106; 60 $50 bills in stack 107; 60 $100 bills in stack 108; 60 $500 bills in stack 109; 60 $1,000 bills in stack 110; 60 $5,000 bills in stack 111 and 60 $10,000 bills in stack 112. This provides a total of $1,000,650 in playing money which is ample for playing the game in accordance with the rules to be hereafter set forth.

Referring now to FIG. 9, a plurality of patent cards are therein illustrated and designated generally 113. There is a patent card for each of the concept or inven tion cards 58. Each patent card displays the title of the invention on the line shown at 114. It also indicates the cost of the patent if the search establishes that the invention is broadly patentable on line 115. If the search card indicates that the invention embodies only limited patentability, the cost of the patent under this condition is indicated on line 116. And, finally, the fixed royalty of the patent is set forth in line 117.

RULES OF THE GAME AND METHOD OF PLAY It will be understood that the rules of the game and method of play are subject to variation within a wide range, the principal factor being that the concept or invention cards are related to the particular manufacturing plants and the search cards indicate the results of the search and the type and cost of the patent which may be obtained thereon.

One set of rules embodying this principle is set forth as follows:

I. It is intended that the game be played by from two to six players. Each of these players selects a playing piece and is given $100,000 in playing money. He is also given an adequate number of property chips which correspond in color to his playing piece. One of the players is selected as the banker for the Patent Office and the patent attorney.

2. Play begins at board section 21 which is marked Home. A player spins wheel 85 and as the wheel comes to rest, ball 95 will be positioned in one of the angular sections in inner groove 93. This position of the ball designates the number from one to eight which is to be effective in controlling that move of the player. He then moves his playing piece that number of sections away from section 21 in a socalled clockwise direction, that is downwardly from the righthand side of the board as displayed in FIG. 1.

3. Should the player land on a section marked concept, he draws a Concept Card from the top of stack 58 which is positioned over playing area 57. He retains this card in his possession until on a subsequent playing turn he lands on a section marked Patent Attorney. This entitles him to initiate proceedings to obtain a patent on this concept. This is accomplished by paying the banker who represents the patent attorney a sum of money to cover the cost of a patentability search. By way of example, this sum is established at $125. He then draws a Search Card from the top of stack 62 which is on area 61. Ifthe search card indicates that the invention is Anticipated, he returns the search card to the stack on area 61 and the concept card'to the stack on area 57. If the card he draws should bear the designation Patentability Doubtful, the card is returned to the bottom of the stack on area 61 and another card drawn from the top of the stack. If he draws a card marked either Broadly Patentable or Limited Patentability, he retains both the search and concept cards.

4. When a player reaches the Patent Office, either by landing directly thereon as at the completion of a move, or by passing the Patent Office, he can if he so desires, acquire a patent on the invention indicated by his concept card. The cost will be displayed on the particular patent card and will depend on whether the invention is broadly patentable or has only limited patentability, as indicated by the search card.

5. When a player lands on a manufacturing plant section, that is, upon the completion of any move, he may buy that manufacturing plant. The purchase price is determined by spinning the wheel and is indicated on the outer wheel, that is, in the angular section of outer groove 99 in which ball 101 comes to rest. If the ball lands on a section marked No Deal, the player cannot buy the plant at that time. If the player does buy the plant, he places one of his property chips 68 in the groove 67 of that manufacturing plant section to indicate his ownership thereof.

6. If a player holds a patent on a particular invention, it is useless unless he also owns the corresponding manufacturing plant or has licensed or sold the patent.

7. When a player owns a manufacturing plant and holds the patent on an invention related thereto, and should another player land on this manufacturing plant section, the wheel is spun and the player so landing must pay to the respective owner and patent holder the amount shown on the outer wheel. This sum represents the cost of the plant product which he has purchased. Should No Deal be indicated on the outer wheel, he buys nothing and pays nothing.

8. Should a player own a manufacturing plant, but not the patent on the invention related thereto, but has acquired a license to this patent, as by negotiation between the players, the conditions of Rule 7 apply, with the following exception: when the player who lands on the manufacturing plant section spins the wheel, the plant owner collects the sum of money displayed on a bottom surface 91 of the angular section of inner groove 93 in which ball 95 comes to rest. This sum of money is ordinarily less than the corresponding sum of money displayed on the outer groove. Thus, the plant owner receives a sum which is less when the patent is merely licensed, as compared to having ownership thereof.

9. Should a player land on a manufacturing plant section which he does not own but holds the patent on an invention related to that manufacturing plant, the owner may acquire license under that patent by spinning the wheel and paying to the patent holder whatever price is indicated on the outer wheel. If No Deal is indicated on the outer wheel, then the plant ownership must wait until one again lands on his section to acquire the license.

10. Should the holder of a patent land on a manufacturing plant section which he does not own and to which his patent is related, the patent holder may sell his patent to the plant owner by negotiating the purchase price. The patent holder does not have to sell the patent if he does not wish to do so.

ll. Should a player land on the section marked Patent Auction at the end of a move and holds title to one or more patents, he may place any of such patents up for bid. All of the remaining players have the right to bid, with the amount of such bids being determined by spinning the wheel, with the price being indicated on the outer wheel. Should the player holding the patent desire not to sell he may exercise this right by spinning the wheel and if No Deal is indicated on the outer wheel, then he does not have to sell the patent.

12. Should a player land on the section marked Patent Office Review, the wheel is spun and the player collects the amount shown on the outer wheel for each patent he owns.

13. Should a player hold a patent on which a license has been extended to a manufacturing plant owner, everytime the patent holder passes that manufacturing plant section the plant owner must pay to him the fixed royalty indicated on the patent.

14. While the playing of the game may be substantially continuous or non-ending, provision may be made for determining a winner by causing a player to drop out anytime he goes bankrupt, that is, when he runs out of playing money.

While a preferred specific. embodiment is herein disclosed, it is to be clearly understood that the invention is not to be limited to the exact constructions, mechanisms and rules illustrated and described because various modifications of these details may be provided in putting the invention into practice. 3

What is claimed is:

1. in a board game,

a. a rectangular board having a playing surface and four side edges,

b. a plurality of playing sections arranged in alignment along each of said side edges, one of said playing sections constituting the starting point of the game and another section displaying a symbol representing the Patent Office;

0. one playing section along each side edge displaying a symbol denoting an inventive concept and another playing section along that side edge displaying a symbol denoting the office of a patent attorney, and remaining playing sections along this side edge displaying symbols denoting manufacturing plants of different character;

d. a plurality of concept cards, each of which identifies an invention related to a particular manufacturing plant'denoted on a playing section, there being a concept card for each manufacturing plant section on said board;

e. a plurality of search cards, each of which displays the result of a patentability search;

f. a plurality of patent cards, each of which identifies an invention on a concept card and displays the cost of the patent of that card;

g. a plurality of playing pieces of different colors;

h. a plurality of property chips of colors corresponding to the colors of the playing pieces;

i. a supply of playing money, and

j. a chance device for determining the number of playing sections over which a playing piece is moved and also the price of certain transactions involving patents. 2. The board game of claim 1 in which said board is square and the playing section which indicates the starting point'of the game is at a corner of the board and the playing section which denotes the Patent Office is at another corner of the board.

3. The board game of claim 2 in which the playing surface of the board has an area marked thereon for receiving said concept cards in stacked condition and another area marked thereon for receiving said search cards in stacked formation.

4. The board game of claim 2 in which the board is formed with a groove in each playing section which denotes a manufacturing plant and the property chips take the form of discs dimensioned to be removably positioned in said grooves.

5. The board game of claim 2 in which one of the playing sections of the board at a corner displays a symbol denoting Patent Office Review and another playing section displays a symbol denoting Patent Auction.

6. The board game of claim 1 in which the chance device takes the form of a double wheel of the roulette type which is mounted centrally of the board and projects upwardly from the playing surface thereof.

7. The board game of claim 6 in which the board is formed at its center with a recess opening into the upper face thereof and defined by a conical surface and a bottom wall; a hub upstanding from the center of said bottom wall, and the double wheel includes a central inverted cup-shaped member fitted over said hub; an

inner annular groove immediately adjacent to said cupshaped member and divided into angular sections by radial dividers, with the angular sections being pro vided with indicia; a ball in said inner annular groove; an outer annular groove immediately adjacent to said inner annular groove and divided into angular sections by radial dividers; a ball in said outer annular groove; indicia on the angular sections of said outer groove, and a cover plate closing both of said grooves.

8. The board game of claim 7, together with a spindle extending through said hub and cup-shaped member and a tubular member formed integral with said cupshaped member extending upwardly therefrom and having a bore receiving said spindle and a finger engaging member at the outer end of said tubular member.

9. The board game of claim 1 in which each of the patent cards indicates a cost of the patent which is related to the results of a patentability search as indicated on a search card.

10. The board game of claim 9 in which a plurality of the search cards indicate that the concept is anticipated, another group of the search cards indicates that the invention is broadly patentable, and another group indicates that the concept is of limited patentability.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3961795 *Mar 3, 1975Jun 8, 1976Anti-Monopoly, Inc.Antitrust prosecuting board game
US3977680 *Jan 15, 1976Aug 31, 1976Lavine Matt PBoard game apparatus involving criminal justice
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US4136881 *Jan 31, 1977Jan 30, 1979Ralph AnspachGame equipment and method having simultaneously played, balanced, multiple game theories
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US6452613Mar 1, 2000Sep 17, 2002First Usa Bank, N.A.System and method for an automated scoring tool for assessing new technologies
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US6817613 *Mar 20, 2002Nov 16, 2004Electronic Data Systems CorporationSystem and method for teaching project management skills
US6859782 *Dec 19, 2000Feb 22, 2005Bob F. HarshawMethod for new product development and market introduction
US7597326Apr 13, 2006Oct 6, 2009D Antonio Dennis PBoard game using the alphabet and colors
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Classifications
U.S. Classification273/256, 273/142.00E, 273/142.0HA
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F2003/00141, A63F3/00006, A63F3/00138
European ClassificationA63F3/00A22