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Publication numberUS3850500 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 26, 1974
Filing dateSep 11, 1972
Priority dateNov 27, 1970
Publication numberUS 3850500 A, US 3850500A, US-A-3850500, US3850500 A, US3850500A
InventorsCobaugh R, Heisey J
Original AssigneeAmp Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stamped and formed post and miniature spring receptacle
US 3850500 A
Abstract
A unitary post and receptacle having at least one depending post and spaced longitudinal spring legs. The end portions of the legs are laterally flared and one of the legs is provided with spaced sidewall portions which are parallel or laterally flared. Together, the flared spring legs and sidewall portions define a tapered receptacle extending between the legs. A tab on one of the sidewall portions partially overlies one of the legs.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Cobaugh et al.

STAMPED AND FORMED POST AND MINIATURE SPRING RECEPTACLE Inventors: Robert Franklin Cobaugh; Jay

Merlin Heisey, Elizabethtown, both of Pa.

Assignee: AMP Incorporated, Harrisburg, Pa. Filed: Sept. 11, 1972 Appl. No.: 288,852

Related U.S. Application Data Continuation of Ser. No. 93,204, Nov. 27, 1970, abandoned.

U.S. Cl. 339/258 R, 339/17 C Int. Cl H011 13/12 Field of Search 339/17, 176, I92, 221,

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 339/33 339/220 R x 339/258 R x Ruehleman West Coldren et a Nov. 26, 1974 3,434,094 3/1969 Walter 339/258 R x 3,555,497 1/1971 Watanabe 339/258 R 3,601,782 8/1971 Vlijmen 6:61, 339/176 MPX 3,602,875 8/1971 P1611111 339/17 or x 3,673,551 6/1972 McDonough 339/258 R 3,685,001 8/1972 Krafthefer 339/17 or x FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLlCATlONS 1,490,561 4/1969 Germany 339 258 F Primary Examiner-Paul R. Gilliam Assistant Examiner-Lawrence J. Staab Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Gerald K. Kita [5 7] ABSTRACT A unitary post and receptacle having at least one depending post and spaced longitudinal spring legs. The

end portions of the legs are laterally flared and one of v the legs is provided with spaced sidewall portions which are parallel or laterally flared. Together, the flared spring legs and sidewall portions define a tapered receptacle extending between the legs. A tab on one of the sidewall portions partially overlies one of the legs.

2 Claims, 14 Drawing Figures PATENT :mv 2 SVIIHH SHEEI 10F 4 STAMPED AND FORMED POST AND NHNIATURE SPRING RECEPTACLE CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a point-to-point post and receptacle which may be secured to a mounting panel or board.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The present invention relates to a single piece or unitary post and receptacle provided with longitudinal depending post for connection to a mounting panel or board. The post is provided with an integral stamped and formed receptacle including a laterally projecting U-shaped bight and spaced longitudinal spring legs on the bight. A tapered receptacle is formed between the spring legs by laterally flared end portions of the legs cooperating with flared or parallel sidewall portions projecting from one of the spring legs. At least one sidewall portion has a tab which partially overlies the other of said legs which is cantilever mounted on the bight. The tab prevents overstressing of the cantilever mounted spring leg upon receiving an electrical contact within the receptacle.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION Another object of the present invention is to provide a stamped and formed post with an integral receptacle formed between a pair of spring legs.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a unitary post and receptacle having spring legs with flared end portions and a pair of sidewall portions forming a receptacle.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a post with a unitary receptacle, defined between a pair of spring legs, and a pair of sidewall portions, wherein at least one sidewall portion include a tab partially overlying one of said spring legs to prevent excessive deformation thereof.

Other objects and many attendant advantages of the present invention will become apparent upon perusal of the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is an isometric of a unitary post and receptacle according to a preferred embodiment;

FIG. 2 is an isometric of a plurality of unitary posts and receptacles arranged in columns and rows and attached to a mounting panel and further illustrated with a typical electronic apparatus having depending electrical contacts to be received within the receptacles;

FIGS. 3a, 3b, and 3c are fragmentary composite plan views, when considered in serial relationship, illustrate a metal strip and an exemplary stamping and forming progression resulting in a modified embodiment of the invention shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a section taken along the line 4-4 of FIG. 3b;

FIG. 5 is a section taken along the line 55 of FIG. 3b;

FIG. 6 is a section taken along the line 6-6 of FIG. 3c;

FIG. 7 is a section taken along the line 7-7 of FIG. 3c;

FIG. 8 is a section taken along the line 8-8 of FIG. 36;

FIG. 9 is a section taken along the line 9-9 of FIG. 3c;

FIG. 10 is a section taken along the line lib-10 of FIG.

FIG. 11 is an enlarged detail section taken along the in FIG. 10.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS With more particular reference to FIG. 1 of the draw- I ings, there is illustrated generally at l, a unitary post and receptacle including a longitudinally depending post 2 of generally rectangular configuration and provided with a beveled pointed end 4. The post includes outwardly flaring lateral sidewall portions 6 immediately adjacent to an enlarged rectangular portion 8. The portion 8 includes an integral, laterally extending U-shaped bight 10 having an upstanding, generally longitudinally extending spring leg 12, substantially in line with the post 2. The springleg 12 includes a laterally outwardly curved or bowed portion 14 immediately adjacent to the bight 10. The spring leg 12 additionally includes an inwardly reversely curved or bowed portion 16 immediately adjacent to an outwardly flared end portion 18.

The bight I0 is further provided with a second longitudinal spring leg 20 in opposed spaced relationship with respect to the leg 12. The leg 20 includes an inwardly curved or bowed portion 22 adjacent to, and opposed in relationship with, the bowed portion 16. The leg 20 terminates in a laterally outwardly flared end portion 24.

The flared end portion 18 and the inwardly bowed 7 portion 16 is provided integrally thereon with sidewall portions 26 and 28. As shown, the sidewall portions are formed and bent into positions generally extending between the spring legs 12 and 20 and in opposed spaced relationship with respect to each other. The sidewall portions 26 and 28 are additionally laterally outwardly flared, however, they may be planar parallel and not flared. Diagonally extending comer tabs 30 and 32 are provided between the flared end portions 18 and the configurations. The sidewall portions 26 and 28 are provided with tabs 38 and 44) respectively which are formed and bent to extend toward each other and partially overlie the inwardly bowed portion 22 of the spring leg 20. As shown in the figure, the flared end portions 18 and 24 and the flared sidewalls 26 and 28 together define a tapered contact receiving receptacle extending generally between the spaced opposed spring legs 12 and 20. The spring leg 12 is generally in longitudinal alignment with the post 2 and is purposely designed to be substantially rigid, whereas, the spring leg 20 is cantilever mounted to the bight and is capable of being resiliently deflected toward and away from the leg 12. For example, upon receiving a male electrical contact within the described receptacle the outwardly flared spring legs configurations guide and readily accommodate insertion of such contact. Additionally, the spring leg will be resiliently deformed or deflected in a direction away from the spring leg 12 upon insertion of the contact. The tabs 38 and 40 provide positive stops to limit the deformation or deflection of the spring leg 20. Accordingly, the tabs provide an overstressing means to prevent excessive deformation or deflection and resultant overstressing of the spring leg 20.

With reference to FIG. 2, there is particularly shown a plurality of unitary post and receptacles, as particularly shown in FIG. 1, secured in a mounting board or panel 42 of dielectric material and positioned in spaced rows corresponding to the locations of spaced male contacts or leads 44 of a micro-electronic circuit com- 1 ponent 46. Each receptacle flared configuration, formed by its corresponding sidewalls 26 and 28 and the spring end portions 18 and 24, serve to guide a corresponding lead 44 during insertion thereof. The spring leg 20 of each receptacle will be resiliently deformed or deflected away from the opposed leg 12 to accommodate the corresponding lead 44 therebetween. The resilient spring action of the leg 20 will insure clamped contact of the corresponding lead 44 between the legs 12 and 20. During insertion of the lead the tabs 38 and 40 of a respective receptacle will limit excessive bending and deformation of the spring leg 20 to prevent overstressing thereof. As shown, the preferred embodiment can be modified by eliminating one of the tabs, leaving only one tab, such as the tab 40 which is sufficient to prevent overstressing as described.

As more particularly shown in FIG. 1, the bight portion 10 and the post portion 2 are of thicker cross section than the spring legs 12 and 20. A tapered interconnecting sidewall portion 40 provides a transition in metal thickness between the spring leg 12 and the bight portion 10. In similar fashion, a tapered sidewall 42 forms a transition portion of metal stock thickness between the spring leg 20 and the bight portion 10. Also the relatively thicker bight portion 10 provides a base supporting the relatively readily deflectable spring portions 12 and 20 on a board or panel 42 as shown inFIG. 2.

With reference to FIGS. 11 and 12 of the drawings, a modification of the embodiment shown in FIG. 1 will be described in detail. Generally shown at 48, is a modification including a pair of adjacent longitudinal projecting posts 50 and 52 having respective terminal end portions 54 and 56 inwardly bent toward one another. The post 52 is relatively shorter in length and is inclined toward the post 50. The posts integrally project from a generally lateral cylindrical bight 58. More specifically, the posts 50 and 52 are located on opposed sides of one circular end of the bight 58 and include reverse curved end portions 60 and 62 directed toward each other and locating the posts 50 and 52in adjacent relationship inwardly of the bight circumference. As shown in FIG. 12, the posts 50 and 52 are also in aligned coplanar relationship. As shown in FIG. 11, the

bight 58 is fabricated from a single piece of metal hav-.

ing marginal edge portions 64 and 66 abutted together in formation of the bight circumference. The bight also includes integral oppositely directed spring legs 68 and 70, originating on opposite sides of a circular end of the bight, gradually curved along their longitudinal dimensions toward each other until they contact at reverse curved portions 72 and 74 and terminate in outwardly flared terminal end portions 76 and 78. The terminal end portion 76 is provided with integral sidewall portions 80 and 82 projecting in spaced parallel relationship. The portion 82 has a projecting tapered lateral portion 84 terminating in a generally L-shaped tab 86. As shown in FIGS. 11 and 12, the terminal end portion 78 of the spring leg is received generally between the spaced sidewall portions and 82, and the tab 86 is partially folded to project from the plane of the sidewall portion 80 and overlie the outwardly flared terminal end portion 78. The tapered portion 84 of the sidewall portion 80 is provided to position the tab 86 generally in spaced relationship overlying the central portion of the flared terminal end portion 78. The end portion 76 is integral with a stem 88 which is part of a continuous carrier strip, a portion of which is shown at 90. A groove 93 extends entirely across one surface of the stem 88 to facilitate separation of the device 48 from the stem.

In use the device 48 may be inserted into a card or board such as the board 42 in substitution for the preferred embodiment 1. As shown the device 48 is shown inverted with respect to the preferred embodiment l. The pair of posts 50 and 52 when inserted into the board 42 are resiliently biased toward each other to provide resilient spring action against the board to prevent inadvertent removal therefrom. To permanently secure the device 48 in the board 42, the posts 50 and 52 may be solder dipped, in the well known manner, the space between the posts providing a wicking action which accepts and retains fluidized solder until it solidifies. A receptacle is formed by the spring legs, the terminal end portions 76 and 78 cooperating with the flanged portions 80 and 82. Upon receiving the leads I 44 of the exemplary microelectronic component 46, the spring legs 68 and 70 will be resiliently biased apart, the tab 86 preventing overstressing of the spring leg 70 in a manner similar to the tab 38 or 40 of the preferred embodiment shown in FIG. 1. It is to be understood that the receptacle portion of the device shown in FIG. 1 may be similar in configuration to the receptacle portion of the device shown in FIG. 11 by eliminating the kerfs 34 and 36 and by making the flared sidewalls 26 and 28 in parallel spaced apart relationship similar in configuration to the sidewall portions 80 and 82.

With reference to FIGS. 3a, 3b and 30, an exemplary stamped and formed die progression for the device shown in FIGS. 11 and 12 will be described in detail. Thus, with reference to FIG. 3a, a fragmentary portion of the continuous metal strip 90 is shown in detail with a plurality of spaced apertures 92 being punched along one margin of the strip thus providing a perforated carrier strip for progressively advancing the carrier strip serially through punching and forming work stations. At one work station, the marginal edge opposite the perforations 92 is punched to form the end portions 52 and 56 of the posts 54 and 56. As the carrier strip is supplied serially to another work station, notches 94 are provided to separate and finally fonn the posts 54 and 56. Medial portions 96 and 98 of the carrier strip are removed by a punching operation at yet other serially located work stations. With reference to FIG. 3b, additional medial portions of the carrier strip are removed at 100 and 102 at still additional serially located work stations. A parting line 104 is added at still another serially located work station. At still another serially located work station, generally indicated at 106, the posts 50 and 52 are bent to their final bowed or curved configurations shown in FIG. 11, and, with reference to FIGS. 4 and S, the configuration of the carrier strip 90 together with the configurations of the posts 50 and 52 are shown in greater detail.

With reference again to FIG. 3b, a further medial portion of the carrier strip is removed, as shown at work station 108, to form the terminal end 78 of the spring leg 70 immediately adjacent to the sidewall portion 80. Simultaneously, a piece 79 is removed from the spring leg end 78. At still another serially located work station, generally indicated at 110, the projecting tab 86 on the sidewall portion 80 is bent and formed to its configuration shown in FIGS. 11 and 12.

With reference to FIG. 30, at still another serially located work station, a medial portion of the strip 90 is severed at 1 12 providing a metal strip 58- which is later formed into the lateral bight portion shown in FIGS. 1 1 and 12. Also at the work station, the flange portions 80 and 82 are bent and formed to their parallel spaced relationship, as shown in FIGS. 11 and 12, projecting from the spring leg 76. With more particular reference to FIGS. 6 and 7, FIG. 6 shows the spring leg portion 68 formed to its curved configuration. FIG. 7 shows the spring leg 70 formed to its desired curved configuration simultaneously with the spring leg portion 68 and at the same work station.

With further reference to FIG. 3c, there is shown a selected work station, generally shown at 114, which results in the structure shown in FIG. 8. The spring leg 68 is shown still attached to the carrier strip 90 and the receptacle enclosure is partially completed with the sidewall portions 80 and 82 and the tab 86 having been bent and formed to their final desired configurations shown in FIGS. 11 and 12. As shown in FIG. 3c, beginning at a serially'located work station, generally indicated at 116, the strip 58 is bent by successive bending and forming operations from a planar position shown in FIG. 8 to a partially looped configuration such as shown in FIG. 9, until finally, as shown in FIGS. 3c and 10, at an exemplary work station generally indicated at 118, the bight portion 58 is formed to a completely cylindrical configuration. Simultaneously with the formation of the bight 58, the spring leg 70 is progressively pivoted into position between the spaced sidewall portions 80 and 82 and under the overlying tab 86. The clearances are such that when the spring leg is pivoted into position, during the formation of the cylindrical bight 58, it will readily pass in the space between the tab 86 and the flange portion 82. However, upon completion of the bight cylindrical configuration the spring leg will be constrained to move only in cantilever deflection fashion without return pivotal motion and thereby will engage against the tab 86 to prevent further cantilever deflection and overstressing thereof. To complete the operation, reference will be made to FIG. 3c wherein at serially located work station generally indicated at the groove 92 is provided which facilitates separation of the completed post and receptacle from the carrier strip 90.

As shown and described, the die progression is particularly suitable for formation of the preferred embodiment shown in FIGS. 1 1 and 12. However, the progression may easily be modified to form the preferred embodiment shown in FIG. 1. For example, the strip forming the bight portion 58 may be bent and fonned to a U-shaped configuration to conform with the bight portion 10 rather than to a completely cylindrical configuration as required in the formation of the bight portion 58. And, as heretofore described, one of the tabs, such as the tab 38 may be eliminated during formation of the preferred embodiment of FIG. 1, enabling the spring leg 20 to be inserted in the space between the remaining tab 40 and the sidewall 26 during formation of the bight portion in an operation similar to that abovedescribed. In such a modification, the remaining single tab 40 is sufficient to prevent overstressing of the spring leg 20 as it is resiliently bent in cantilever fash- 1011.

Other modifications and embodiments of the present invention are to be embodied in the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A unitary post and receptacle comprising: at least one longitudinal post, spaced spring legs connected to said post, each of said legs having a laterally flared end portion, laterally flared spaced sidewall portions connected to one of said legs, the other of said legs being connected to said post for cantilever spring action, said flared sidewall portions and said flared end portions define a tapered receptacle extending generally between said spring legs, one of said legs being substantially in line longitudinally with said post and being provided with flared comer tabs and a kerf disposed between each of said tabs, and a corresponding one of said flared sidewall portions.

2. A unitary post and receptacle comprising: at least one longitudinal post, spaced spring legs connected to said post, each of said legs having a laterally flared end portion, laterally flared spaced sidewall portions connected to one of said legs, the other of said legs being connected to said post for cantilever spring action, said flared sidewall portions and said flared end portions defining a tapered receptacle extending generally between said spring legs, a second post adjacent to said longitudinal post, and a bight portion connecting said posts, said bight portion carrying said spring legs in spaced opposition to each other.

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Referenced by
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US3955877 *Jun 23, 1975May 11, 1976Amp IncorporatedLow profile contact
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Classifications
U.S. Classification439/858, 439/873, 439/857
International ClassificationH01R13/115, H01R4/02, H01R13/11, H05K7/10
Cooperative ClassificationH01R4/028, H05K7/1038, H01R13/113
European ClassificationH01R13/11E, H05K7/10E3B