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Publication numberUS3851758 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 3, 1974
Filing dateApr 26, 1972
Priority dateApr 26, 1972
Publication numberUS 3851758 A, US 3851758A, US-A-3851758, US3851758 A, US3851758A
InventorsM Makhijani, F Scacciaferro
Original AssigneeIbm
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Semiconductor chip fixture
US 3851758 A
Abstract
Disclosed is a method and apparatus for separating discrete chips of a diced semiconductor wafer without disturbing the orientation of the chips, the chips being bonded to a support or substrate from which they must be separated prior to use. The substrate is first positioned in a fixture so that the diced wafer assumes a predetermined orientation, and then a resilient foraminous pad is pressed against the chips, and a bond releasing fluid is urged, by a novel pump, through the pad until the chips are released from their support, the thickness of the removed bond being compensated for by expansion of the pad. Also disclosed is a fixture which acts as a convenient storage tray for the chips in their original orientation.
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United States Patent Malthijani et a1.

Dec. 3, 1974 SEMICONDUCTOR CHIP FIXTURE OTHER PUBLICATIONS [75] Inventors: Mann} Makhijani; Frank, Wanesky, Western Electric, Technical Digest, No. 15,

Scacc'aferm both of Wappmgers July 1969, p. 19, Package for Transporting Beam- Falls Lead Devices on a Substrate. [73] Assignee: International Business Machines Corporation, Armonk, NY. Primary Examiner-Roy Lake Assistant Examiner-Neil Abrams 2 2] Flled Apr 26 1972 Attorney, Agent, or FirmW1ll1am J. Dick [21] Appl. N0.: 247,614

[57] ABSTRACT [52] 11.8. C1 206/328, 29/203 V, 29/414, Di l d i a th d nd apparatus for separating 134/169 R, 156/155, 156/584, 269/2 discrete chips of a diced semiconductor wafer without 1 17/00, 1325b 1 H00, 365d 85/42 disturbing the orientation of the chips, the chips being [58]v held of Search 29/200 203 V, 413, 414, bonded to a support or substrate from which they 29/427? 134/169 184,201- 196; must be separated prior to use. The substrateis first 53/21 206/65 F, positioned in a fixture so that the diced wafer assumes 4 E 1 a predetermined orientation, and then a resilient foraminous pad is pressed against the chips, and a bond 1 References Clted releasing fluid is urged, by a novel pump, through the UNITED STATES PATENTS pad until the chips are released from their support, the 1,584,034 5/1926 Elliott 206/68 X thickness of the removed bond being compensated for 3,164,749 1/1965 Berge et a1. 206/46 ED UX by expansion of the pad. Also disclosed is a fixture 3,645,281 2/1972 Seidler 206/46 ED UX which acts as a convenient storage tray for the chips in 3,663,326 5/1972 Wanesky.... 156/155 X their original orientation, 3,809,050 5/1974 Chough 269/21 X R26,494 12/1968 Stoker, Jr. 206/80 A x 3 ClaImS, 19 Drawing Flgures l 13 125 l 50 I I 128B 128A l w w-r l L l ll l l 121 12911 L PATENIEUEEC 319m SHEET 10? 6 EEC 31974 PATENTL SHEEF 2 OF 6 iL/Zj +T+ T-r 0t TTI J TTTTTO PATENIE; BEE 31924 SHEET 0? 6 PATENTL 31974 3.851.758

SEEN t 6 v r r 100 Y I or 7 H613 y 587 y/ l l m FFQM FIG. 15

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PATENTE BEE 3|H74 FFG. 19

SEMICONDUCTOR CHIP FIXTURE SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION AND STATE OF THE PRIOR ART The present invention relates to an apparatus for storing discrete chips of a semiconductor wafer, and more particularly relates to a fixture for storing discrete semiconductor chips without disturbing the orientation of the chips. Additionally, the present invention also relates to apparatus for maintaining the semiconductor chips in a precise orientation during separation of the chips from a substrate to which they are bonded.

In the manufacture of integrated circuits, it is common practice to reproduce the design of the circuit as well as active and passive devices on a silicon wafer, the wafer having anywhere from 200 to 1,000 discrete duplications of the particular device or circuit desired impressed therein. After the processing is completed, the wafer is then diced by either a laser, slurry type saw or band saw so as to separate the circuits or components into discrete chips, the chips then being bonded in one fashion or another to a substrate for mounting on a card and then placed into the equipment for which it was designed. During the dicing operation it is conventional practice, to prevent the semiconductor wafer from moving while the cutting of the wafer is being effected, to bond the wafer to a substrate, such as a phenolic block, with a releasable bonding agent such as glycol pthallate and, after dicing to immerse the block into a solvent (such as methylene chloride) which may be agitated to release the chips from the substrate. Thereafter the chips are removed and placed in a vial, box or other container and subsequently oriented at a placement machine and the like for placement onto a ceramic substrate, circuit card, etc.

It has been discovered that the mere pouring of the chips one on top of the other in a container may result in damage to the surface of individual discrete chips, in certain instances destroying and making bad product due to edge contact of one chip against the surface of another chip. With relatively simple circuits or discrete device chips the economic loss is insignificant as compared with the total number of chips in a wafer. However, with the increase in the number of circuits on a chip, and an increase in the size of a chip, as well as an increase in the number of processing steps to fabricate that chip, the loss of a single chip becomes significant. Accordingly, with new test machines it has been found easier to test the chips prior to dicing the wafer which results in a test map which indicates the good and bad product sites or chips on a particular wafer. Accordingly, it is desirable to avoid the damage by pouring chips one on top of the other and to retain their initial orientation as well as position (relative to such test maps) so that good product may be segregated by the use of the test map" from bad product.

The present invention discloses apparatus for maintaining semiconductor chips in a precise orientation during separation of the chips from a substrate to which they are bonded, the apparatus including a first fixture for mounting a diced semiconductor wafer on a substrate, a jig for aligning the diced wafer in a predetermined position on the wafer, and means for connecting the substrate to the fixture. A cover is described for the fixture, the cover including a resilient foraminous pad which overlies and presses individual chips of the wafer against the substrate mounted in the fixture. Additionally, a fixture is disclosed for storing the separated chips which includes a second cover member to hold the chips against the resilient pad and hold the covers together while compressing the resilient pad.

In view of the above, it is an object of the present invention to provide a novel fixture for storing a plurality of semiconductor chips in which the semiconductor chips maintain their fixed orientation.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a fixture which holds the semiconductor chips in a preset and predetermined position and prevents engagement of the chips with adjacent chips.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a fixture in which a vacuum may be drawn on the semiconductor chips held therein so as to facilitate handling of the chips so that subsequent handling of individual chips may be accomplished without disturbing their position in the fixture.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a fixture for mounting a substrate upon which the diced semiconductor wafer is bonded, and to provide means for aligning the fixture relative to the chips bonded to the substrate.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a cover including a novel resilient pad therein which compensates for the thickness of the removed bond holding the chips to the substrate.

Other objects and a more complete understanding of the invention may be obtained by referring to the following specification and claims taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a typical semiconductor wafer (post dicing) bonded to a substrate or support;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken along line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the wafer and support in position in a first fixture;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of the first fixture mounted on a second fixture for adjusting the position of the substrate and wafer relative to the first fixture;

FIG. 5 is a plan view of a jig utilized in conjunction with the second fixture to accurately position the diced wafer relative to the first fixture;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken along line 66 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a special insert into the jig illustrated in FIGS. 5 and 6 for aligning the chips (and substrate) in a predetermined position when chips are missing from the substrate;

FIG. 8 is a plan view of a supporter cover member to be placed over thefirst fixture;

FIG. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken along line 99 of FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a perspective view illustrating the placement of the cover onto the fixture;

FIG. 11 is an enlarged fragmentary side elevational view as viewed along line 1l1l of FIG. 10 and illustrating the placement of the cover member in relation to the fixture;

FIG. 12 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken along line 12-12 of FIG. 10;

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the fixture and cover member positioned upon a novel pump for urging a bond destroying liquid intermediate the chips and substrate;

FIG. 14 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view of a portion of the jig and pump illustrated in FIG. 13;

FIG. 15 is a view of the apparatus similar to that illustrated in FIG. 13 but with the pump in an end of stroke condition;

FIG. 16 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view similar to the structure shown in FIG. 14 except illustrating the position of the various parts of the structure with the bonding material removed;

FIG. 17 is a fragmentary sectional side elevational view illustrating the position of the pump relative to the fixture as the bond is being destroyed.

FIG. 18 is a fragmentary side elevational view illustrating the fixture for removing the substrate or support upon which chips were mounted; and

FIG. 19 is a plan view of the package in which the chips may be stored and illustrating the ability to hold the chips against either the upper or lower cover.

Referring to the drawings and especially FIG. 1 thereof, a semiconductor wafer 10 which was first bonded to a substrate or support 11 by a releasable or destroyable bond I2, such glycol pthallate, and then diced to form discrete chips 13, is shown therein. In the illustrated instance, the support or substrate 11 includes a pedestal portion 11A and a peripherally extending flange portion 118 which circumscribes the pedestal 11A. Dicing of semiconductor wafers is relatively well-known art and may be accomplished in any number of ways including a slurry saw, laser, etc. but in each instance the cut creates a kerf area 14 which extends down into the bond 12, and in many instances into the substrate Ill.

In accordance with the invention, the method of separating chips 13 of the diced semiconductor wafer 10 without disturbing their orientation includes the steps of: positioning the support or substrate 11 in a fixture 20 (FIG. 3), biasing a support or cover member 50 (FIG. 10) against the semiconductor Chips and destroying the bond between the chips and the support as by a pump or the-like 100 (FIG. 13) so that the support member 50 urges the chips against the substrate 11. To this end and referring first to FIGS. 3 and 10, a fixture 20 includes a base 21, and a pair of upstanding, spaced apart side walls 22A, 228 including inwardly projecting ledge portions 23A, 238 which are adapted to overlie the flange 11B of the substrate 11, while permitting limited movement of the substrate for orientation purposes. As best illustrated in FIGS. 3, l0 and 11, each of the ledges includes a clamp 24A, 248 to secure the substrate, once oriented, to the base 21 of the fixture 20. As illustrated in FIG. 11, the clamp includes a simple set screw or the like 25 which presses a leaf 26 connected to the ledge, onto the flange lllB. Projecting from the upper surface 26A and 26B of the upstanding side walls 22A and 22B are dowels 27A and 27B, the dowels preferably being of a different diameter, for purposes which will become more evident hereinafter.

In order to precisely orient the chips I3 on the substrate 11, relative to the fixture 20, the fixture 20 is mounted on a second fixture 28 which clamps the substrate l1 and permits movement of the fixture relative to the substrate to precisely align the chips relative to the dowels 27A, 27B. To this end, the second fixture 28 includes a fixed clamp 29 and a spring bias clamp 30 which are spaced apart on a base plate 28A. The clamps serve to fix the substrate relative to the second fixture 28 while permitting movement of the fixture 20 about the substrate.

In order to effect the proper orientation of the substrate or chips thereon relative to the fixture 20, a jig 31 (FIG. 5) is placed on the dowels 27A, 27B of the fixture 20 and with suitable alignment means on the jig, permits proper registration and alignment of the substrate and thus the chips relative to the fixture 20. To this end, and referring now to FIG. 5, the jig 31 comprises a plate 32 having apertures 33A and 33B therein which register with the dowels 27A, 278 respectively of the. fixture 20. The jig is provided with a central bore 34 approximating the diameter of the diced semiconductor wafer. Depending from an annular recess 35 extending radially outward from the bore 34 are alignment means 36 (see FIG. 6) which includes a support 37 and a depending knife edge 38 which project into the bore 34. As shown in FIG. 5, there are three such depending alignment means 36A, 36B and 36C, the blades associated with each being adapted to align with a predetermined chip kerf area (see kerf 14 in FIG. 2) when the fixture 20 is in proper alignment with the substrate 11.

In order to permit movement of the fixture 20 and jig 31 relative to the substrate, the jig 31 is biased upwardly as by biasing springs 39 which serve to elevate the blades 38 slightly above the level of the chips 13 (FIG. 6). As shown in dotted lines in FIG. 5, there are four such biasing springs.

After the alignment has been effected by the jig 31 in association with the knife blades 38, the substrate is clamped to the fixture 20 as by the clamps 24A, 24B, heretofore described relative to FIGS. 3 and 11, and the jig 31 is then removed.

In certain instances where the wafer has been broken and a portion of the chips are not present on the substrate 11, alignment by the knife blades 38 of the alignment means 36 is difficult, ifnot impossible. To align the remaining chips bonded on the substrate 11, a secondary alignment means 40 having inwardly projecting depending legs 41, 42 and 43 and cross hairs 44 and 45 in a transparent cover 40A, is shown in FIG. 7. A pair of dowels 48 and 49 (FIG. 5) projecting from a raised annulus 31A circumscribing the bore 34, fit into apertures 48A, 49A respectively contained in a lip 47 of the cover 40A. Recesses 46A, 46B, and 46C accommodate the inwardly projecting first alignment support means 36A, 36B, and 36C. When in use, the legs 41-43 are inserted in the bore 34 and the fixture 20 is moved relative to the substrate 11 until the cross hairs are in the proper position relative to the remaining chips bonded to the substrate, the dotted lines 44A, 45A corresponding to the position of the cross hairs 44 and 45 on the alignment means 40 (FIG. 5). If parallax is a problem, the means 40 may be made so the cross hairs are disposed closely adjacent the wafer. This may be accomplished, for example, by fabricating the alignment means from a solid piece of clear acrylic plastic and disposing the cross hairs on the lower portion thereof adjacent the wafer.

After alignment is completed, either of a complete or partial semiconductor wafer and as heretofore described, the substrate ll is clamped by the clamps 24A, 248 to the base 21 of the fixture 20, and the jig 31 is then removed. The fixture 20 is then removed from the second fixture 28 by releasing the clamp 30.

Thereafter, the support or cover member 50 is biased against the chips 13 and clamped to the fixture for destroying the bond 12 between the chips 13 and substrate 11. To this end, the cover member 50 comprises a plate including a double or stepped annular recessed portions 51 and 51A. Inserted into the recess 51A is a resilient foraminous pad 55. The diameter of the second recess 51A, and thus.of the pad 55, is approximately the same as the diameter of the semiconductor wafer 10. Extending from the lower surface 56 of the cover to the upper surface 57 of the recess. 51A are two groups of apertures, 58 and 59, the apertures having extensions through the pad 55 as indicated at 58A, 59A

(FIG. 9). As shown, the apertures of the group 58A terminate in projections or nipples 60, the spacing of the nipples corresponding to the distance from chip to chip. Intermediate adjacent nipples and recessed from the upwardly projecting terminal ends thereof so as to be aligned with the kerf 14 between the chips, lie the group of apertures designated 59, 59A. Tubular stiffeners 61 extend through at least some of the apertures 58 in the cover 50 into the apertures 58A of the pad 55, the terminal ends of the stiffeners being spaced from the terminal ends of the projections or nipples 60.

In order to position the cover 50 so that the nipples 60 of the pad 55 engage each of the chips, the cover includes dowel apertures 53A, 533 which register with the dowels 27A, 27B of the fixture 20. In order to bias the nipples against the chips, (the nipples being under a slight compressive deformation) the cover 50 must be clamped to the fixture 20. To this end, a pair of recesses 54A, 54B extending inwardly from opposite longitudinal ends 50A, 50B of the support cover 50 and including a recessed portion 65A, 65B and ledge 66A, 66B, serves to receive a twist lock 67A, 67B, extending through upstanding side walls 22A, 22B of the fixture 20. Simple rotation of the locks 67A and 67B effects rotation of catches 68A, 68B associated with the locks to grip the ledges 66A, 66B of the cover member 50 thereby biasing the nipples and causing a slight compression of the same against chips bonded to the substrate. (See FIGS. 11 and 12 for the position of the cover 50 relative to the fixture 20 and the position of the nipples 60 of the pad 55 relative to the chips 13.)

After the fixture 20 and cover 50 are locked in position as shown in FIGS. 11 and '12, a bond destroying or releasing fluid may be forced against the bond material 12 causing the bond material to be removed from between the chip 13 and the substrate 11, the nipples 60, having been compressed slightly, taking up the slack as the bonding material is eroded or dissolvedaway. To this end and referring first to FIG. 13, the assembly 75, which comprises the fixture 20 and cover 50 between which is sandwiched the substrate 11 and chips 13, is fixed or aligned onto a bed plate 101 as by upstanding dowels 102A and 102B. The dowels engage the dowel holes 53A, 5313 (see FIGS. 8 and 10) of the cover 50 so that the assembly is now aligned relative to the bed plate 101. Registering with the group of apertures 59 (see FIG. 14) in the lower surface 56 of the cover 50 are apertures of a group 103 located in an insert 104 in the bed plate 101. As may be seen in FIG. 14, the group of apertures 58 in the cover 50 are blocked by the insert 104.

In order to effect a flow of bond destroying medium through the group of apertures 59 and 103, aligned with the kerf 14 of the chips 13, a pump forces liquid through the apertures intermediate the nipples and against the bond dissolving the bond. As illustrated, the pump includes a receiver 105 which is connected to the bed plate 101 and in which is mounted for reciprocation a bellows 106, also supported from the bed plate 101. At the bottom of the receiver is a conduit 107 which permits the entry of a suitable medium, either gas or liquid, in the present instance air, to the interior of the receiver to effect reciprocation of the bellows 106. If the interior of the bellows is filled with a bond releasing or destroying medium (in the instance of glycol pthallate, acetone) upward movement of the be]- lows into the position shown in FIG. 15 will force liquid through the apertures 103 and 59 against the bond destroying the same. At that point in time a vacuum is drawn beneath the bellows through the conduit 107 and the bellows retracts. If the assembly and pump, therefore, are positioned in a tank of the solvent, such as the tank illustrated in FIG. 17, the downward movement of the bellows 106 will cause the fluid to be drawn back through the fixture, downwardly through the apertures 59, 103 and back into the bellows 106. It has been found that the oscillating action of the fluid speeds up the destroying of the bond material. To increase the life of the bellows 106, a mechanical stop 108 is located in the bellows, the upward movement of the bellows thereby being restricted upon the stop 108 engaging the lower surface of the insert 104. The lower stroke or bottoming stroke of the bellows 106, in a like manner, is restricted by upstanding projections 109 which extend from the lower wall of the receiver 105.

As the bond is removed, the nipples extend themselves until the back side of the chip 13 engages the substrate 11 and the assembly may then be removed.

In order to prevent displacement of the assembly 75 when oscillating liquid through the apertures 103 of the insert 104, it is desirable to clamp the assembly to the pump 100 until the solvent has released the bond. While this may be accomplished in any number of ways one such scheme is illustrated in FIG. 17 wherein the pump 100 and assembly 75 is suspended in a tank 110 of the bond releasing liquid. Suspension of the assembly in the tank 110 is effected by a post 11] extending upwardly from the bed plate 101 and supported by an arm 112 mounted for vertical sliding motion on a column 113. As shown the column 113 is mounted on a stand 114 in which is suspended the tank 110. The arm in turn contains a locking lever 115 pivoted as at 116 to apply pressure against the back of the base 21 of fixture 20. An air line 117 extends into the tank and is connected to the conduit 107 to provide the necessary positive and negative pressures to the bellows 106 to effect the pumping action.

After the bond has been destroyed, the locking screws 1128 and 112C may be loosened so as to permit the collar 112A, which is connected to the arm 112, to move upwardly on the column 113 thereby lifting the pump and assembly 75 clear of the tank 110. The locking arm 115 may then be released and the assembly 75 removed.

Inasmuch as the chips are now free from the substrate 11, it is desirable to remove the substrate. To this end, the assembly 75 may be placed on a third fixture 120 which includes a plate 121 mounted on legs 122, the plate having dowels or the like (not shown) for regof the nipples. The twist locks 67A and 67B may then r be rotated and the fixture 20, with the substrate 11 removed. Thereafter, a cover 125 may be positioned over the chips, the cover having a twist lock 126 and 127 identical to the twist lock 67A and 67B heretofore described relative to fixture 20. As illustrated in FIG. 19, the cover 125 may include a plurality of apertures 130 which are aligned with the opposite side or back side of the chips. The apertures serve to prevent surface tension from holding the chips to the cover when removing the cover 125 from the chips. Additionally, the surface of the cover, in registry with the chips, may include a serrated, or cross hatch, or ridged surface to further prevent surface tension gripping of the chips when the cover is removed.

In the event that it is desired to pick up the chips from the front side, as opposed to the back side for placement on circuit cards, ceramic substrates, etc., it may be desirable to use a cover identical to the cover 50 including a pad similar to the pad 51. In this way the vacuum may be drawn through the apertures 130 as opposed to the apertures 58.

Thus the present invention describes a method of separating discrete chips of a diced semiconductor wafer without disturbing the orientation by positioning the support to which the chips are bonded, pressing a resilient pad against the semiconductor chips and urging a bond releasing fluid through the pad until the chips are released from the supporting substrate.

Although the invention has been described with a certain degree of particularity, it is understood that the present disclosure has been made only by way of example and that numerous changes in the construction and the manner of combining parts may be made without departing from the spirit and the scope of the invention as hereinafter claimed.

What is claimed is:

1. A fixture for storing a plurality of semiconductor chips in adjacent, side by side relationship, each of said chips including a kerf at least intermediate adjacent chips; said fixture comprising a first cover member, a second cover member, a resilient pad in said second cover member, and a first group of apertures in said pad and second cover and dimensioned for alignment with individual ones of said chips to permit subjecting said chips to a vacuum through said pad and cover, and a second group of apertures dimensioned for alignment with the kerfs of said chips, and means to hold said covers together while compressing said resilient pad against said chips.

2. A fixture in accordance with claim 1 including a second group of apertures in said pad and said second cover member intermediate said projections for alignment with the kerfs of said chips.

3. A fixture for storing a plurality of semiconductor chips in adjacent, side by side relationship, each of said chips including a kerf at least intermediate adjacent chips; said fixture comprising a first cover member, a second cover member, a resilient pad in said second cover member, said pad including a plurality of tubular projections having terminal ends adapted for engaging individual ones of said chips, and a first group of apertures extending through said second cover member and said projections to permit subjecting said chips to a vacuum therethrough; and means to hold said covers together while compressing said resilient pad against said chips.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/710, 156/155, 29/414, 134/169.00R, 257/E21.238, 29/760, 269/21, 156/764, 156/942
International ClassificationH01L21/304, B26F3/00, H01L21/67, H01L21/301
Cooperative ClassificationY10S156/942, H01L21/3043
European ClassificationH01L21/304B