Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3851886 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 3, 1974
Filing dateApr 15, 1974
Priority dateApr 15, 1974
Publication numberUS 3851886 A, US 3851886A, US-A-3851886, US3851886 A, US3851886A
InventorsAcosta A
Original AssigneeMartinson A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Foldable golf practice swing apparatus
US 3851886 A
Abstract
Two spaced columns rise from a planar base to which they are pivotally secured and terminate in a second pivot linking a support arm adjustably extending from the columns. A bearing reversibly mounted on the support arm carries a target rod which in operation extends toward the planar base. A brake pad is biased against the bearing. A retainer at the end of the target rod carries a target ball. The apparatus folds for transport.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Armando E. Acosta, Los Angeles, Calif.

Abner J. Martinson, Redondo, Calif.

Filed: Apr. 15, 1974 App]. No.: 460,872

Inventor:

Assignee:

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3/1961 Bales 273/26 E United States Patent [1 1 [111 3,851,886 Acosta Dec. 3, 1974 FOLDABLE GOLF PRACTICE SWING 3,262,703 7/1966 Hodlick 273/58 c x APPARATUS 3,731,926 5/1973 Vincent 273/200 B Primary Examiner-George J. Marlo Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Wm. Jacquet Gribble.

[5 7] ABSTRACT Two spaced columns rise from a planar base to which they are pivotally secured and terminate in a second pivot linking a support arm adjustably extending from the columns. A hearing reversibly mounted on the support arm carries a target rod which in operation extends toward the planar base. A brake pad is biased against the bearing. A retainer at the end of the target rod carries a target ball. The apparatus folds for transport.

8 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures PATENTEL SEC 3 974 SHEEF 10? 2 I PATENTEL DEB 3 4 SHEEF 2 0F 2 BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS In the Figures aplanar base 11 which may havev di- The invention relates to devices for practicing golf mensions of 18 inches by 24 inches is covered with an swings, such as drives from the tee and iron shots from the fairway. Several devices of this type have been marketed and patented, but each of the prior devices has had one or more drawbacks. Exemplary of the previously patented devices are the following US. Pat. Nos.:

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The invention contemplates a golf swing practice apparatus which comprises a substantially planar base, a pair of spaced columns which rise from the base and a first pivot to secure the columns adjustably to the base. A second pivot at the end of the spaced columns remote from the base adjustably secures a support arm. Locking means and the second pivot adapt the support arm to extend from the spaced columns at a selected angle thereto. A target rod attaches to a bearing on the support arm such that the rod may swing with respect to the support arm. A retainer at the end of the target rod receives a target ball. By the locking means the orientation of the target ball above the planar base may be altered to conform to the particular type of swing the user wishes to practice by raising or lowering the target ball with respect to base surface. Preferably, the bearing on the support arm and the target rod are removable and reversible as a unit such that the target ball may be driven either clockwise or counterclockwise when the user is facing the spaced columns across the target ball. In a preferred embodiment springloaded brake means inhibit rotating motion of the target rod about the bearing.

The apparatus of the invention is adjustable for different swing practice, assumes either right or left-hand orientation and folds for transport.

These and other advantages of the invention are apparent from the following detailed description and drawing.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is an end elevation, partly broken away, of an embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary plan view of the embodiment of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary side elevation of the embodiment of FIG. I; and

FIG. 4 is a plan view to a lesser scale of the embodiment of FIG. 1 folded for transport.

artificial turf sheet 12. A plurality of screws 13 secure a base plate 14 to one side of the planar base at each of the plate corners.

In each of the planar base corners a grommet l7 affords means for ground spikes (not shown) to pass through the planar base and secure the base in place at the practice site. Obviously the device can also be used in a commodious interior without the spikes. As can be best seen from FIG. 3, a mounting tongue 19 rises centrally from the base plate. A pair of spaced columns 21, 22 are secured to the tongue by a threaded member 23 which has a fastening nut 24 at one end and an integral cylindrical head 25 at the other. Diametrically opposed manipulating handles 26 extendfrom the head. Preferably the bottom portion of column 21 is recessed at 27 to seat fastening nut 24 such that it does not turn when fastener 23 is turned.

From the pivot defined by fastener 23, the spaced columns rise to a second pivot means comprised of a hex head threaded fastener 28 having a shank extending through each of the columns and terminating in a nut 31. The shank pivotally supports a support arm 33 having a spacer boss 34, a thin extension 35 and a cylindrical head 36. Threaded fasteners 38, 39 pass through opposite ends of a pair of adjustable braces 41, 42 which adjustably secure support arm 33 at the desired angle with respect to the substantially vertical spaced columns 21, 22.

Fastener 39 passes through holes (not shown) in the braces and through arm extension 35 adjacent cylindrical head 36 terminating in a nut 40. Fastener 38 passes through the intermediate portion of each of the columns 21, 22 and through a longitudinal elongate slot 44 in the lower end of each of the adjustable braces 41, 42. The lower ends are separated by a hollow spacer 45. As is apparent from FIG. I, the attitude of support arm 35 with respect to the columns may be changed by loosening fasteners 38 and 39 and adjusting the positions of the elongate slots of braces 41, 42 with respect to fastener 38.

Support arm 35 terminates away from the columns 21, 22 in a threaded stud 46 to which a bearing 47 is secured by a nut 48. The bearing may have an outer race 49 to which a target rod 51 is secured by convenient means. One such means is to braze a threaded nut 52 to the periphery of the race and secure therein a threaded portion 53 of the target rod.

As can best be seen by FIGS. 2 and 3, the target rod has a transverse ball retainer 55 having a ball-receiving cup 56. A stop nut 57 and its attendant washer 58 locate the cup on the transverse extent of the threaded ball retainer. A target ball 59 is secured in the cup to the retainer.

The target ball may be a conventional or solid state golf ball threadably engaged with the transverse ball retainer 55. A rim 61 of the cup is proportioned such that the ball, standard in size, makes tangential contact therewith so the force applied to the ball by a golf club is in part absorbed by the cup. Obviously, various substitute materials may be used to provide a target ball giving substantially the same impact effect as a conventional golf ball.

It has been found that a conventional steel roller skate wheel provides all the characteristics necessary for the bearing 47 with the target rod secured to the periphery of the bearing and the transverse ball retainer 55 oriented in the plane of rotation of the bearing. The device may be converted from a practice device for a right-hand player to a practice device for a left-hand player by simply removing nut 48 and reversing the bearing and target rod on the stud 46.

Normally the velocity imparted to the ball upon impacting it with a club causes rotation about the axis of the support arm which might continue for some time, thus limiting the amount of time that could be spent in practice. It is therefore desirable that the rotation of the bearing and target rod be inhibited. The invention provides for such inhibition by means of a springloaded brake. The brake comprises a mounting tab 63 depending from the cylindrical head 36 and a pivot pin 64 extending through the tab and an L-shaped brake member 65 having a plurality of pivot pin holes 66 spaced along one arm of the L. An extension spring 67 is attached to a second depending tab 68 at one end and through one of the brake member apertures 66 at the other end. The extension spring biases a brake pad 69 against a side wall 71 of the bearing outward of the bearing hub. The amount of bias is adjustable by changing the position of the extension spring end to another of the various holes 66 in the arm of the brake member. The rotation of the bearing and the target rod around the axis of the support arm is thereby restrained Referring again to FIG. 1, it can be seen that the position of target ball 59 above turf surface 12 may be altered in different ways. It is possible by sole adjustment of support braces 41, 42 to either raise or lower the ball with respect to the surface. Alternatively, the position of the ball with respect to surface 12 may be changed by loosening first pivot 23 by manipulation of cylindrical head 25 to alter the vertical attitude of columns 21, 22.

The position of the ball with respect to the edge 72 of the planar base may be changed by utilizing both adjustments simultaneously, thereby maintaining the desired vertical attitude of the ball with respect to surface 12. The placement of the ball with respect to the toes of the player may thus be adjusted such that the player need never stand on the planar base 11.

FIG. 4 illustrates the attitude of the apparatus of the invention when the apparatus is folded either for transport to and from the practice situs or for shipping. By loosening pivots 23 and 28 and disengaging fastener 39 from the braces and support arm, the columns 21, 22 and the support arm may be brought into relatively linear alignment and the support columns folded toward the planar base. Rotation of the bearing and target rod with respect to the support arm axis enables the bearing to be lowered to the level of the turf surface 12 while the target rod extends substantially parallel to that surface at right angle to the columns. The effective height of the apparatus is thereby considerably reduced from its practice attitude, accommodating transport in relatively small space. The grommets l7 afford easy fastening of the apparatus to a solid surface by means of conventional spikes (not shown). The proportions of the planar base make it easy to employ the base as a lever to lift any of the corner spikes from the sod,

While the specification and drawing employ a single embodiment to illustrate theinvcntion, many alternate embodiments and modifications will occur to those skilled in this art. It is therefore desired that the scope of the invention be measured by the appended claims rather than by the purely illustrative embodiment disclosed herein.

I claim:

1. A golf swing practice device comprising a substantially planar base, a pair of spaced columns extending from the base, first pivot means securing the columns to the base, second pivot means at the end of the columns remote from the base, a support arm secured by the second pivot means and adapted to extend from the spaced columns at an angle thereto, means for locking the support arm at a selected angle to the spaced columns, a bearing on the support arm, a target rod fixed to the bearing so as to extend away from the support arm, a target ball retainer at an end of the target rod, and a target ball fixed to the retainer.

2. A device in accordance with claim 1 wherein the first pivot means comprises a base plate, an upstanding tongue and means adapted to releasably secure the spaced columns to the tongue.

3. A device in accordance with claim 1 wherein the means for locking the support arm comprises a pair of spaced braces adjustably secured to the spaced columns, and means releasably securing the braces to the support arm.

4. A device in accordance with claim 3 wherein the means adjustably securing the braces is removable, and the support arm and the columns are movable to a position substantially parallel to the planar base when the first and second pivot means are loosed.

5. A device in accordance with claim 1 further com prising a brake inhibiting rotating motion of the target rod about the bearing.

6. A device in accordance with claim 5 wherein the brake comprises a brake arm pivoted from the support arm, a lever extending from the brake arm, a spring secured to the lever biasing the brake against the bearing, and a brake pad on the brake arm adapted to bear against the bearing mount.

7. A device in accordance with claim 6 wherein the lever arm comprises an extending portion, and spring retaining means spaced at intervals from the brake arm pivot point at the support arm.

8. A device in accordance with claim 1 wherein the bearing is reversible on the support arm such that the target rod ball retainer is re-oriented with respect to the planar base to present the target ball at the planar base for either right and left-handed users.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2976040 *Sep 19, 1958Mar 21, 1961Bales Jack JPractice tether ball device
US3262703 *Jul 23, 1963Jul 26, 1966Hodlick Irving CFoldable captive ball game apparatus
US3731926 *Oct 28, 1970May 8, 1973D VincentTraining device including captive ball to be struck by game club
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5513842 *Sep 30, 1994May 7, 1996Fuss; Christopher A.Golf swing training aid
US5700203 *Dec 6, 1996Dec 23, 1997Shieh; FrankGolf training device
US5746667 *Mar 24, 1997May 5, 1998Fraser; Paul M.Suspension type golf tee
US6579189Sep 24, 1999Jun 17, 2003Ronald R. AnzalduaMobile golf practice device
US9011277 *Aug 23, 2012Apr 21, 2015Dominic SchellBall-striking training apparatus
US20070032305 *Jul 31, 2006Feb 8, 2007Heinbigner Leonard FGolf swing practice device
US20140057742 *Aug 23, 2012Feb 27, 2014Dominic SchellBall-Striking Training Apparatus
WO1998042416A1 *Feb 12, 1998Oct 1, 1998Stanley Dwayne ProctorSuspension type golf tee
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/139
International ClassificationA63B69/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B69/0091
European ClassificationA63B69/00T3