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Publication numberUS3852819 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 3, 1974
Filing dateApr 10, 1968
Priority dateJun 15, 1967
Also published asDE1549075A1, DE1549075B2
Publication numberUS 3852819 A, US 3852819A, US-A-3852819, US3852819 A, US3852819A
InventorsStaar T
Original AssigneeStaar S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic changer for cassette player-recorder
US 3852819 A
Abstract
A cassette player recorder with automatic changer is disclosed. A bottomless magazine provides for storage of a plurality of cassettes. The changer mechanism provides for consecutive play of the cassettes in the magazine, utilizing a change cycle for transferring each cassette to a tape transport, automatically returning the cassette to the magazine after the playing operation is completed, and advancing the magazine one step to locate the next cassette for the next change cycle.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 1111 Staar 1 Dec. 3, 1974 [5 AUTOMATIC CHANGER FOR CASSETTE 3,353,443 11/1967 H811 353/15 PLAYER RECORDER 3,359,665 12/1967 Gerry 274 11 c 3,408,139 /1968 'Schwartz ct al. 353/15 In ntor: Theo hiel Clement Jozef L d j 3,477,785 1-1/1969 Gould et al. 353/111 Staar, Kraainem, Belgium 3,488,058 1/ 1970 Staar 274/4 E [73] Ass1gnee: S. A, Staar, Brussels, Belgium Primary Examiner Harry N. Haroian [22] Filed: Apr. 10, 1968 Attorney, Agent, or Firm-W0lfe, Hubbard, Leydig, 21 Appl. No.: 720,236 Osam" [57] ABSTRACT 1 1 Foreign pp a Priority Data A cassette player recorder with automatic changer is June 15, 1967 Belgium 44973 disclosed. A bottomless magazine provides for storage of a plurality of cassettes. The changer mechanism [52] US. Cl. 360/92, 360/ provides for consecutive play of the cassettes in the [51] Int. Cl. Gllb 5/00, Gllb 23/04 magazine, utilizing a change cycle for transferring [58] Field of Search 274/4, 1 1; 353/15, 19, each cassette to a tape transport, automatically return- 353/; 2l4/16.4; 179/1002 ing the cassette to the magazine after the playing operation is completed, and advancing the magazine one [56] References Cited I step to locate the next cassette for the next change cy- UNITED STATES PATENTS cle.

3,146,666 9/1964 Misuraca 353/111 44 Claims, 49 Drawing Figures TF1 F11 .4 l- UU 11 rrarmr PATENTE. 553 31974 sum as nr14 PAIENTELBEE 3M4 3.852.819

' sum as as 14 fivaewnr PATENTELUEE 3W4 3.852.819

Awzwmr PATENIELBEB sum I yrroA /vfxr AUTOMATIC CHANGER FOR CASSETTE PLAYER-RECORDER DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a cassette playerrecorder equipped with an automatic changer, and more particularly to a player-recorder apparatus having a magazine for storage of a plurality of cassettes, and a changer for transferring each cassette from the storage magazine to a tape transport and for returning the cassette to the storage magazine after the playing operation has been completed.

The term cassette is used herein to mean a tape cartridge of the type in which magnetic tape is carried on two reels enclosed in a flat, thin, plastic container, the tape being fed back and forth (reel-to-reel) for recording or playback. Each end of the tape is fastened to one of the reels and the tape may be provided with a pair of monaural-tracks or two pair of stereo tracks for recording or playback of sound in either direction of movement of the tape within the cassette.

The terms tape deck or tape transport are used interchangeably herein to mean mechanism which provides powered capstans and reel hub spindles for drive of the tape reel-to-reel within a cassette, the cassette having openings in its faces for introduction of the capstans into the cassette on the inward side of the tape and the drive spindles into the reel hubs so that the tape may be unwound from one reel, moved past the recording or playback heads, and wound on the other reel. Recording and playback heads are included in the player-recorder and adapted to be connected to suitable electronic circuits, microphones or speakers, so as to be capable of recording sound on or playing sound from the tape.

The principal object of the invention is to provide an automatic changer which provides magazine storage of a plurality of cassettes and means for automatically transferring a cassettefrom the magazine to a tape transport playing the cassette, and thereafter returning the cassette to the magazine.

A related object is to provide a change which pro-- vides automatic, consecutive cycles in which the cassettes stored in the magazine are successively transferred from the magazine, played and returned, and the magazine is advanced one step to bring the next cassette into operative position.

Another important object of the invention is to provide an open, accessible storage magazine which may be easily and conveniently loaded and from which the othercassettes may be rem oved,'replaced or havetheir order changed while a cassette is playing.

A further object of the invention is to provide an automatic changer which introduces the tape and reel drive elements into the cassette in such a manner as to avoid damage to the tape and other operative elements in the cassettes.

Another object of the invention is to provide an automatic changer which drops the cassette from a magazine into the'tape transport and which utilizes power driven elements for lowering the cassette into playing position, the same power driven elements that lower the cassette into the tape transport mechanism being used to raise the cassette to return it to the magazine at the completion of the playing cycle.

Another object is to provide an automatic changer with safeguards to prevent damage to the changer mechanism and the tape transport mechanism by automatically causing rejection of cassettes dropped from the magazine into the tape transport mechanism in the wrong position, as for example, where cassettes have been placed in the magazine upside-down.

A further object of the invention is to provide sensing elements andcontrols for an automatic changer so that it proceeds through consecutive playing cycles until all the cassettes in the magazine have been played and thereafter automatically turns itself off.

A related object is to provide for moving a partly filled magazine past empty sections to play all the cassettes in the magazine consecutively.

Another object is to provide an automatic changer that is operable to proceed through consecutive playing cycles which may be interrupted at any time to return the cassette which is then being played to the magazine and either (I) automatically turn the apparatus off or (2) proceed through the playing cycle of the next cassette in the magazine.

Another object of the invention is to provide a playing cycle which involves dropping one cassette at a time from the storage magazine and feeding the cassette to the tape transport in such a manner as to insure precise, gradual engagement of the tape and reel drive elements of the tape transport with operative elements within the cassette.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent upon reading the following detailed description and upon reference to the drawings, in

which:

FIG. 1' is a vertical section of a cassette playerrecorder with automatic changer constructed according to this invention with portions of the changer mechanism drive means shown fragmentarily or omitted for clarity;

FIG. 1a is a fragmentary horizontal section taken substantially in the offset planes of lines la la in FIG.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary vertical section taken through i the magazine in substantially the plane of lines 2-2 in FIG. 3;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the player-recorder as shown inFIG. l with parts of the magazine broken away;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary plan view of the player-recorder takenwith the magazine removed to illustrate the entrance slot to the tape transport;

FIG. 5 is a vertical cross-section of the playerrecorder taken in substantially the plane of lines 5-5 in FIG. 3 and illustrates a cassette retained in operative position in the magazine over theentrance slot to the tape transport by the retaining rod;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary vertical cross-section taken substantially in the plane of lines 6-6 in FIG. 3 and illustrates one of the other cassettes in the magazine supported in the bottomless magazine by rails on the frame of the apparatus;

FIG. 7 is a vertical section of the player-recorder taken substantially in the plane of lines 7-7 in FIG. 3 and illustrates the subassemblies of the apparatus in the same position shown in FIG. 5 with a cassette in the magazine over the entrance slot to the tape transport.

FIG. 7a is an enlarged fragmentary vertical section illustrating principally the tape transport lowering and magazine advance subassemblies shown in the left hand portion of FIG. 7;

FIG. 7b is a fragmentary horizontal section illustrating elements of the magazine advance subassembly and is taken in substantially the plane of lines 7b7b in FIG. 7a;

FIG. 70 is a fragmentary horizontal section similar to FIG. 7b and is taken substantially in the plane of lines 7c7c in FIG. 7a;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary vertical section illustrating elements of the retaining means and is taken substantially in the plane of lines 88 in FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical section illustrating the automatic stop cam carried by the magazine and is taken substantially in the plane of lines 99 in FIG. 3;

FIG. 10 schematically illustrates the drive gears and cams of the apparatus; I

FIG. 11 is an enlarged fragmentary section illustrating elements of the magazine advance subassembly and is taken substantially in the plane of lines 11-11 in FIG. 7a;

FIG. 11a is a reduced fragmentary vertical section taken substantially in the offset planes of lines lla-lla in FIG. 11;

FIG. 12 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical section illustrating principally the cassette lowering and retainin'g subassemblies shown advanced from the position in the right hand portion of FIG. 7 partially through the change cycle and the cams A and B partly rotated to retract the retaining rod and release the cassette from magazine to the lowering elevator;

FIG. 13 is a vertical section like FIG. 7 with the I changer subassemblies shownadvanced from the position of FIG. 7 to the end of the first (cassette lowering) portion of the change cycle with the cassette and tape transport. in playing position;

FIG. 13a is an enlarged fragmentary vertical section illustr'atingprincipally the tape transport lowering and magazine advance subassemblies in the left hand portion of FIG. 13;

FIG. 13b is a fragmentary vertical section illustrating the means for latching the tape transport in playing position not shown in FIG. 13;

FIG. 130 is a fragmentary vertical section illustrating the parts advanced from the position shown in FIG. 13b

' I and the tape transport after unlatching at the beginning of the cassette return portion of the change cycle;

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary vertical section like FIGS. 7 and 13, illustrating the subassemblies immediately after the beginning of the cassette return portion of the change cycle and with the tape transport unlatched and returning the cassette to the magazine.

FIG. 14a is an enlarged fragmentary vertical section like FIG. 13a and illustrating principally the position of the tape transport sub-assembly in the event of malfunction where the tape transport is blocked against lowering movement, and the position of the elevating means sub-assembly which operates independently of the lowering movement of the tape transport to imme- V I diately return the cassette to the magazine to safeguard against damage in such event;

FIG. 15 is a fragmentary vertical section of the magazine advance subassembly taken as it operates to advance the magazine during a later phase of the cassette return portion FIG. 15a is a fragmentary horizontal section taken substantially in the plane of line 15a in FIG. 15;

FIG. 15b is a fragmentary horizontal section taken substantially in the plane of line 15b in FIG. 15;

FIG. 16 is a fragmentary vertical section like FIG. 15 taken as the magazine advance subassembly returns at the end of the magazine advance function;

FIG. 16a is a fragmentary horizontal section taken substantially in the plane of line 16a in FIG. 16;

FIG. 16b is a fragmentary horizontal section taken substantially in the plane of line 16b in FIG. 16;

FIG. 17 is a fragmentary vertical section like FIG. 9 illustrating the automatic stop cam moved to the operative position to engage the associated linkage;

FIG. 18 is a vertical section taken like FIG. 7 but with the magazine moved to locate the last compartment above the entrance slot and the automatic stop cam in the operative position, and illustrating the position of the subassemblies particularly the stop linkage shifted by the stop cam;

FIG. 19 is a vertical section similar to FIG. 18 but with the tape transport and cassette lowered to the playing position;

FIGS. 18a and 19a are enlarged fragmentary vertical sections of the subassemblies shown in the left hand portions of FIGS. 18 and 19, respectively;

FIG. 18b is an enlarged fragmentary vertical section taken substantially in the planeof lines l8bl8b in FIG. 18a and illustrating the magazine advance linkage in its non-advance'position as the result of movement thereto by the automatic stop cam which is operative as the last compartment in the magazine is moved above the tape transport;

FIG. 20 is a fragmentary vertical section taken substantially in the plane of lines 20-20 in FIG. 3 illustrating the arrangement of push buttons;

FIG. 21 is a diagram illustrating the phases of a change cycle;

FIGS. 22-29 are schematic views of the control circuit for the player-recorder changer mechanism and illustrating the position of components thereof in different phases of a change cycle;

FIG. 30 is a horizontal plan view with portions broken away and shown in section of an alternative annular form of magazine;

FIG. 31 is a fragmentary vertical section taken substantially in the plane of lines 3l'3l in FIG. 30 illustrating the construction of the annular magazine and withv portions of the changer mechanism illustrated diagrammatically.

GENERAL CHANGER ORGANIZATION Referring to the drawings, FIGS. 1 and 3 taken together illustrate, a cassette player-recorder with automatic changer constructed in accordance with the present invention. The unit includes a bottomless, horizontally movable magazine 10 for storing a plurality of cassettes each of which is adapted to be carried by the changer mechanism through a change cycle involving lowering the cassette to playing position in the tape transport 1 l, which is mounted below the magazine on a fixed frame 12, playing the sound from or recording sound on the cassette tape, and returning the cassette to the magazine. It will be understood that when the cassette is in the playing position, which is the position of the cassette shown in FIG. 13, the tape is moved by the transport mechanism past recording or playback type known as cassettes which provide reel-to-reel movement of the tape within the hollow cassette case, the opposite faces of which have reel hubs 18 for reel drive shafts 20 and also have openings 22 (FIGS. 5 and 6) accessible adjacent the forward edge 24 for introduction of tape drive capstans 26 (FIG. la). The cassettes are carried in the magazine 10 side by side each' standing on the forward edge 24 of the cassette which edge has a plurality of openings for access to the tape,

when the cassette is in the playing position, for the recording and playback heads 13 and pinch rollers 34. As

shown in FIGS. la and 13, a pinch roller 34 cooperates 1 with the drive capstan 26 of the tape transport 11 which enters the cassette on the inwardly facing side of the tape to engage its non-coated surface, the outw wardly facing recording surface of the tape being moved past the heads 13 as the tape is transported from reel to reel within the cassette.

CASSETTE STORAGE MAGAZINE By means of the changer mechanism each cassette may be lowered into playing position by being slid in its main plane, and the apparatus is preferably oriented such that this sliding movement of the cassette occurs vertically downwards between spaced vertical frame plates 36, 38 (FIG. la) from the magazine to the playing position. The bottomless magazine 10 (FIG. 3) is preferably rectangular and formed by longitudinal side walls 40, 42 and end walls 44 and is divided into transverse compartments by means herein shown as partition like elements 46 which project from the vertical side walls 40, 42 of the magazine. For support of the magazine 10 for horizontal sliding movement, as shown in FIG. 6, the side walls 40, 42 have tongues 48, 50

which slide in facing horizontal grooves 52, 54 provided in fixed supporting frame members 56, 58.

The magazine is thus movable to locate any one of its compartments (and a single cassette therein) in operative position above the space between the frame plates 36, 38. As shown in FIGS. 3-6, a horizontal frame plate 60 supports a pair of longitudinal rails 62, 64 on which the cassettes in the magazine restexcept for the single cassette in the magazine compartment above the entrance slot 66, which entrance slot 66 is transversely located relative to the rails 62, 64 to interrupt the rails. That single cassette is held from falling through the entrance slot 66 by a longitudinal retaining rod 68, the

upper edge of which lies slightly below the plane of the top surface of the supporting rails 62, 64 and beneath the cassette. The rod is adjacent one end of the slot so that the cassette starts to fall into the slot when it is brought into operative position above the slot 66 and is held by the rod in such a manner that it tilts away from the adjacent side wall 40 (FIG. 5) ofthe magazine and into leaning engagement with the opposite side wall 42 of the magazine, to insure that upon retraction of the rod 68-the cassette will not stick to the walls of the magazine andwill readily drop through the en trance slot toward the tape transport. For mounting the rod 68 (FIG. 2) for swivelling retraction and return motion it is bent upwards near each end and the tips 72 of the rod are bent to extend parallel to the main section of the rod and seat in sockets 74 in the end walls 44 of the magazine. By swivelling the rod and retracting it from under the magazine (FIG. 12) the single cassette in the compartment disposed above the transverse entrance slot 66 is released to drop by gravity through the slot for lowering to the playing position (FIG. 13).

CASSETTE TAPE TRANSPORT For guiding the cassette into engagement with the tape transport tape and reel drive elements, vertical guides or grooves 76 (FIG. 1a) adapted to be slidably engaged by the lateral edges of a cassette during its downward movement are mounted on the fixed plate 36 and constrain the cassette movement to a vertical plane. The tape transport includes a movable frame or support 78 (FIG. 1) which carries a drive motor 80 for the capstan 26 and reel drive shafts 20 which comprise the tape and reel drive elements of the tape transport. The support 78 is movable so that the drive elements enter into penetrating engagement with the cassette as the latter moves to playing position. For introducing the tape and reel drive elements into the cassette the movable support is carried on the fixed frame 12 by means herein shown as parallelogram links 88 so that the movable support and the elements carried thereby move simultaneously together with and toward the cassette as it moves vertically downward within the guides, and the drive elements enter the cassette (with a linear motion substantially perpendicular relative to the face of the cassette).

Means associated with the movable frame of the tape transport also serve to lower the cassette while maintaining it in registration with thetape and reel drive elements so that such elements properly enter the openings in the face of the cassette, said means in this case comprising a pair of pins 90 (FIGS. 1 and 1a) fixed to the movable plate 78 and projecting into the space between the stationary frame plates where they enter tubular members for lugs 92, 94 that project across the vertical path of the cassette and are carried in vertical slots 97, 98 (FIG. 5) in one of the frame plates 38 for vertical movement, the pins 90 being effective to raise and lower the lugs 92, 94 together with the raising and lowering movement of the movable support so that a cassette carried on the lugs 92, 94 is maintained in registration with the tape and reel drive elements. Each lug 92, 94 is provided with a flange 95, 96 at its base which fit in similar slots 97, 98 in the fixed frame plate 36 so that the lug has straight up and down motion and together the lugs 92, 94 carry the cassette both downward to'the playing position and upward after the playing operation to return it to the magazine at the completion of the change cycle. One of the features of this particular type transport is that the tape and reel drive elements on the movable support 78 gradually act on and penetrate the face of the cassette during its lowering movement, and also gradually separate from the cassette during its return movement.

CASSETTE TRANSFER-CHANGE CYCLE According to the present invention, after retraction of the retaining rod 68 so as to drop a cassette into the entrance slot 66 (FIG. 12) to the transport mechanism,

a transfer means to lower the cassette until it rests on v the two lugs 92, 94 (FIG. 7a) connected to the transport mechanism movable frame, and the cassette follows the two lugs by gravity as they descend with the movement of the transport mechanism movable plate 78. The movable plate 78 moves downward and also approaches the plane of cassette movement. As a result of this movement, not only are the capstan 26 and drive shaft introduced into the cassette,,behind the tape and into the openings in the reel hubs, respectively, but also a force is applied directly to the cassette to hold it against the lugs 92, 94 and in the final stage of movement of the cassette to playing position, to locate and align the cassette relative to the recording and playback heads. In the present case the alignment means is shown as a clip 105 (FIGS. 1, l3) fastenedto the movable plate 78 which comes to bear against the edge 106 of a raised projection which is on both main surfaces of the cassette. The alignment clip 105 is carried by the movable plate 78 and is thus gradually moved into engagement with the cassette during the course of its downward movement to the playing position.' Once it moves into engagement with the cassette, it serves as a positive means for positioning the cassette in its final alignment with the tape stretched across the recording and playback heads and pressed against such head by a resilient pressure pad installed for this purpose inside the cassette, the final stage of movement of the cassette being against the opposing force of such resiliently mounted pad.

After the playing operation, the cassette is carried .upward in the guides 76 by upward movement of the movable tape transport plate 78, and the elevator arm 99 is effective to carry the cassette from the tape transport 11 to the magazine 10, the retaining rod 68 being returned to retain the cassette in the magazine.

CHANGER OPERATING MECHANISM In carrying'out the invention, the power to move the components of the changer through the change cycle is provided by linkages operated by motor driven cams A, B and C..As shown in FIG. 1, a motor 101 is fixed to the frame 12. This motor. 101 drives the three cams A, B and C (FIGS. 5,7 and 10) and associated sets of linkages, to coordinatelybut independently operate (1) the cassette retaining means 68 which is effective to hold and release. an individual cassette from the magazine, (2) the elevator arm 99 which-is effective to transfer a released cassette from the magazine partially along the guide means to the transport movable frame, (3) the tape transport movable frame 78 which is effective to carry the tape and reel drive elements into penetrating relation with the cassette in the operating position, as well as (4) magazine advance, interlock, and

. switching functions which occur during the change cycle. As herein shown, two of such carns A, B are formed on opposite surfaces of a circular toothed gearmember 102, such cams A B operating the cassette retaining means 68 and elevator arm 99, respectively. Cam C is formed on a similar toothed gear member 103 which is intermeshed with the gear member 102, and operates the tape transport frame 78.

MAGAZINE CASSETTE RETAINING ROD OPERATED BY CAM A Cam A is a positively acting face cam formed by a 5 groove 107 in one surface of the member 102. Referring to FIGS. 7, 8, 12 and 13, for moving the retaining rod 68 through its retraction and return stroke a link 108 is provided having a slot 109 in its upper edge into which the retaining rod 68 fits, and pivoted at its lower 10 end on the pin 110. The link 108 is oscillated to impart the desired motion to the retaining rod by a rocker arm 112 which is also pivoted about the fixed pin and has a follower roller 113 at its lower end which rides in the groove l07 of the cam A. Thus, the retaining rod 15 68 is retracted to release the cassette to start the change cycle by motion of the rocker arm 112 produced by the cam A, the retaining rod 68 being returned to block the entrance slot 66 by the completion of 180 of cam A rotation.

To prevent damage to the linkage in the event that a partly lowered cassette or other obstruction blocks movement of the retaining rod 68, the link 108 is resiliently connected for movement by the rocker arm 112 by means herein shown in FIG. 8 as a hairspring 114. Said hairspring 114 is wound around a pin 111 and has two arms 114-1, 114-2, which pass through apertures in a flange 115 at the upper edge of the rocker arm 112 CASSETTE TRANSFER MEANS OPERATED BY CAM B As the cassette is dropped from the magazine, it falls onto the cassette transfer means served by the elevator arm 99 (FIG. 12) which is driven by a plate cam B on the opposite surface of the toothed member 102. The elevator arm 99 is moved by a forked link 117 having a follower roller 118 fixed to the link 1'17 intermediate its ends so as to ride on the edge 120 of cam Band pivoted at its right hand end as viewd in FIG. 12 on a pivot 119. Cam B is thus effective followingthe start of the change cycle by means of its rotation to lower the elevator arm 99 and thereby the cassette downward to the tape transport and by rotation of the cam B through during the first portion of the change cycle to move the arm to. its lowermost position (FIG. 13).

TAPE TRANSPORT MOVABLE SUPPORT OPERATED BY CAM C In the present case the downward movement of the tape transport plate 78 to carry the cassette to playing position is provided by 180 of rotation of cam C which is coordinately driven with cams A and B. Cam C is formed on one surface of the toothed gear member 103 which, as illustrated in FIG. 10, meshes with the first gear member 102. It is driven by a spur gear 122 which is operated through a gear train 123 from the drive motor 101. To control and impart the required vertical motion to the movable plate 78 of the transport mechanism, one of the pins 90 (FIGS. 1, 7) that projects from the movable plate 78 and extends across the path of motion of the cassette and through. the tubular lug 92, is fastened to a connecting link 124 which in turn is driven by a drive link 125 operated by the cam C. Cam C is a'face cam formed by a groove 126 in the surface of the gear member 103 and operates a cam follower roller 127 fixed near the left end of the drive link 125 (FIG. 7) which rides in the groove of cam C, the drive link being pivotally mountedat its right hand end. As cam C rotates at the start of the change cycle, the dwell section provides delay while the cassette is falling from the magazine and being transferred by the elevating arm 99 to the tape transport lugs 92, 94. After the cam C rotates its dwell section past the follower 127, the drive link 125 is driven downwardly by the cam C. The tape transport movable plate 78 initially drops by gravity and accompanies the descent of the drive link 125, the top edge of a slot 128 in the connecting link 124 resting on a pin 129 which extends from the left end of the drive link 125. An interlocking link 130 becomes operative during this phase of the operation (the gravity descent of the cassette and movable tape transport plate) to prevent blocking and damage to the mechanism if, during this phase of the operation, the passages in the cassette do not register with the drive elements carried on the movable plate 78. Such may occur if the cassette is inadvertently placed in the magazine upsidedown, or an obstruction may prevent the cassette from moving together with the movement of the tape trans port by gravity. Non-registration of the passages in the cassette with the drive elements stops the approach movement of the moving plate 78 towards the plane of cassette movement upon the drive elements abutting the outside of the cassette. Since the approach movement of the movable plate 78 is linked with its descending movement the stoppage of one causes stoppage of the other.

The result of interrupting the descent of the movable plate 78 is that the connecting link 124 which is fastened to the movableplate 78 abruptly stops its descent. So that the drive link 125 under the action of cam C can continue its downward movement independently of the connecting link 124 in the event that the descent of the movable plate 78 is stopped, the slot 128 allows the pin 129 to slide downward in the slot clearing the interlocking link 130. The changer mechanism, therefore, will continue its cycle (FIG. 14a) without interruption and as a further feature of this aspect of the construction will orient itself to immediately return the cassette to the magazine by continuing the rotation of the cams A, B and C through the entire change cycle. In the second part of such cycle, the drive link 125 is raised by cam C which raises the pin 129 into abutment with the upper edge of slot 128 and thus raises the connecting link 124 to bring the movable plate 78 to its uppermost position freeing the cassette from any interfer ence and allowing the elevator arm 99, responsive to continued rotation of cam B, to raise the cassette and return it to the magazine.

In the event that the cassette which is being carried into the tape transport is properly positioned and moves downwardly together with the movable plate 78 and in registration with the drive elements carried thereby, the connecting link 124 will descend with the drive link 125 without interruption. After the initial period of descent of the connecting link by gravity, the cam C is utilized to positively drive the connecting link downwardly and thereby the movable plate downwardly and into its final playing position with the cassette, assuming the interlock to prevent damage to the mechanism has not come into operation and the cassette is properly registered with the drive elements of the tape transport. In the present case this is achieved by utilizing the interlocking link 130 as a means to transmit force from the drive link to positively urge the connecting link 124 and movable plate of the tape transport downward in unison. Thus, the interlocking link is pivotally mounted on a pin 131 to the connecting link and is urged counterclockwise as shown in FIG. 7 about its pivot by a resilient spring 132. A pin 133 which projects from the interlocking link 130 into a recess 134 in the fixed vertical frame plate 38 acts as a follower on a cam surface provided by the left vertical edge of the recess. The shape of the edge as shown in FIG. 7a is such that the top section 134-1 of the edge is vertical so that the interlocking link 130 is maintained in its clockwise position as shown in FIG. 7a upon downward movement of said interlocking link with the connecting link 124 at the start of the cassette introduction and movable transport plate movement. As such movement proceeds, the pin 133 rides down the inclined section 134-2 of the recess allowing the link 130 to pivot counterclockwise so that its upper edge 135 is placed under the pin 129 which is carried by the drive link 125 as shown in FIG; 13. Further downward movement of the drive link 125 is effective to positively strike the pin 129 down against the upper edge 135 of the interlocking link 130 to urge the connecting link and movable plate downwardly for the remaining portion of the tape transport plate movement to the. playing position, to positively drive the tape transport movable plate 78 downward during its final increment of motion.

As the movable plate 78 of the tape transport is driven down by the cam C to lower the cassette into playing position, the plate meets a spring 136 which opposes the final downward movement of the tape transport plate, and stores energy for starting the upward return movement of the plate during the second (cassette return) portion of the change cycle after the cassette has been played. The movable transport plate 78 is latched against the force of the spring 136 by a pawl 137 (FIG. 13b) which engages behind a stud 138 on the movable plate 78 and serves to hold the tape transport and the cassette in final playing position until released by the latching solenoid 140, the cam C having a wide groove section after the step in the groove 107 so as to temporarily release the follower roller 127 on the drive link 125 so that the plate may be held by the latching pawl.

Referring to FIGS. 13 and 25, for conditioning the control circuit to de-energize the cam drive motor 101 and stop the cams with the tape transport and cassette in the playing position, a switch 139 is engaged and opened by the drive link 125 as it is driven by the cam C to its lowermost position; how the control circuit operates will be described in detail below.

into playing position, cam C through the connecting link 124 is also effective to lock the magazine against movement. In the present case this is achieved by the connecting link lowering a flat, detent member 142 from a raised position (FIGS. 7, 11) into a lower, locking position (FIG. 13) relative to a magazine locking

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US3996616 *Jan 20, 1975Dec 7, 1976Robert N. FinkCombination cassette changer and recording machine
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US5237467 *Feb 14, 1991Aug 17, 1993Exabyte CorporationCartridge handling apparatus and method with motion-responsive ejection
US5416653 *May 7, 1993May 16, 1995Exabyte CorporationCartridge handling apparatus and method with motion-responsive ejection
Classifications
U.S. Classification360/92.1, G9B/15.138
International ClassificationG11B15/68
Cooperative ClassificationG11B15/6815
European ClassificationG11B15/68B2