Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3853185 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 10, 1974
Filing dateNov 30, 1973
Priority dateNov 30, 1973
Also published asDE2452438A1, DE2452438B2
Publication numberUS 3853185 A, US 3853185A, US-A-3853185, US3853185 A, US3853185A
InventorsH Dahl, T Edmond
Original AssigneeContinental Oil Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Guidance system for a horizontal drilling apparatus
US 3853185 A
Abstract
A drilling apparatus for forming a horizontal borehole substantially parallel to a first drilled horizontal borehole which has a signal generating apparatus inserted into the first borehole. A horizontal drill is inserted into the subterranean strata adjacent the first drilled borehole and operated until it is in the formation. A signal receiver contained in the horizontal drill apparatus will then receive a signal generated by the signal generating apparatus. The signal generating apparatus will always be maintained a fixed distance behind or in front of the horizontal drilling apparatus. The signal receiver in the horizontal drill will also include an antenna sensitive to direction which can orient itself with the signal generating apparatus. Knowing the angle between the horizontal drill and the signal generating apparatus, along with the distance along the first borehole between the horizontal drill and the signal generating apparatus, will provide sufficient data to calculate the distance between the first horizontal borehole and the drilling apparatus.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Dahl et al.

[451 Dec. 10, 1974 1 GUIDANCE SYSTEM FOR A HORIZONTAL DRILLING APPARATUS [75] Inventors: Herbert Douglas Dahl; Tibor O.

Edmond, both of Ponca City, Okla.

[73] Assignee: Continental Oil Company, Ponca City, Okla.

22 Filed: Nov. 30, 1973 21 Appl. No.: 420,410

Primary Examiner-Henry C. Sutherland Assistant ExaminerRichard E. Favreau Attorney, Agent, or Firm-William J. Miller [57] ABSTRACT A drilling apparatus for forming a horizontal borehole substantially parallel to a first drilled horizontal borehole which has a signal generating apparatus inserted into the first borehole. A horizontal drill is inserted into the subterranean strata adjacent the first drilled borehole and operated until it is in the formation. A signal receiver contained in the horizontal drill apparatus will then receive a signal generated by the signal generating apparatus. The signal generating apparatus will always be maintained a fixed distance behind or in front of the horizontal drilling apparatus. The signal receiver in the horizontal drill will also include an antenna sensitive to direction which can orient itself with the signal generating apparatus. Knowing the angle between the horizontal drill and the signal generating apparatus, along with the distance along thefirst borehole between the horizontal drill and the signal generating apparatus, will provide sufficient data to calculate the distance between the first horizontal borehole and the drilling apparatus.

10 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures GUIDANCE SYSTEM FOR A HORIZONTAL DRILLING APPARATUS BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART The closest prior art relating the concept disclosed herein is the US. Pat. Nos. to Barrett, 3,578,807 and 3,521,796, both of which relate to a tunnel digging apparatus. A US. Pat. No. to James C. Coyne, 3,589,454, discloses a system for controlling an underground mole in accordance with a pair of antennae which are positioned on the surface of the earth. The patents to Barrett disclose a method for digging a tunnel utilizing a radioactive stripe which is placed along the edge of the tunnel which has been dug. A radioactive sensor is mounted on the tunnel digging machine and picks up the radiation released by the radioactive stripe. The digging machine maintains its distance from the first formed hole by maintaining a constant radiation being detected. The patent to Barrett also discloses the concept of tuned radio frequency lengths, for example, metal rods or painted stripes being placed along the tunnel wall. A signal generated by the digging machine is tuned to the rods or stripes which provide a reflected signal which is picked up by the tunnel digging machine. The patent to Coyne discloses a concept of mounting an antenna on the surface of the earth and controlling a mole or horizontal drill in accordance with a rotating magnetic field generated by the pair of antennae.

BRIEF DISCUSSION OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a method for drilling a second elongated, horizontal borehole which is substantially parallel to a first drilled horizontal borehole by inserting a horizontal drill into the ground along an axis parallel to the first drilled hole and spaced from the first hole. A signal generating means is then positioned in the first hole a known distance with respect to the horizontal drill. As the horizontal drill is operated, the signal generating means is maintained a fixed distance in the first bored hole with respect to the distance the horizontal drill has penetrated. A receiving antenna contained in the horizontal drill determines the angle between the horizontal drill and the signal generating means. Knowing the angle and knowing the distance that each device is in its respective borehole, the distance can be easily calculated by the use of trigonometry.

A more nearly parallel hole can be drilled by adding a second loop antenna detector and determining a second angle. A comparison of the first and second angles will determine the exact orientation of the drill with respect to the originally drilled hole.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES FIG. 1 is a top sectional view taken through two horizontally bored holes, illustrating the signal generating means and the horizontal drill;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the boreholes illustrating the method for controlling the penetration of the signal generating means with respect to the horizontal drilling apparatus; and,

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a signal generating means.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Referring to all of the figures, but in particular to FIG. 1, a formation has a bored horizontally drilled hole 11 and a horizontal borehole 12 which is in the process of being drilled by a horizontal drilling apparatus generally referred to by the number 13. A signal generating means 14 has an antenna 15 used for radiating a radio frequency signal. A control cable 16 is attached to the signal generating means 14. The horizontal drill 13 generally comprises a rotary drill 8, a deflecf tion unit 9, a drilling motor 17, which is mechanically coupled to a shaft 18, to drill 8, an instrument package 19, which contains a loop antenna 20. A power mechanism 21 is coupled to the horizontal drill and comprises a plurality of pressure feet 22. A second portion of the power-driving mechanism 23 likewise has a plurality of pressure feet 24. Portion 23 is connected to portion 19 by a shaft 25.

A second housing 26 may be attached to the second portion 23. Cable 16A is attached to housing 26. A second loop antenna 24 is mounted in housing 26.

Referring to FIG. 2, the signal generating means 14 has its antenna 15 mounted on the front of the housing. Along the side of the housing is positioned a plurality of drive wheels 30. Drive wheels 30 are operably coupled to a motor (not shown) which in turn is coupled to a power source 31 which may, for example, be a battery. Power source 31 is coupled through wires 32 and 33 to a pressure switch 34, which is mechanically maintained in a closed position by a spring 35. Cable 16 is connected to switch 34 in a manner to open switch 34 if signal generating means 14 progresses past the length of cable 16. Power source 31, however, maintains power at all times to the signal generating system coupled to antenna 15.

The cable control system is illustrated in FIG. 3 and essentially comprises a reel coupled to a flexible cable 41 to a drive motor 42 and a reel 43 coupled to a flexible drive cable 44 to motor 42. A slip clutch 45 couples flexible cable 41 to reel 40. A cable metering system comprises a roll coupled through a flexible cable 51 to a second roll 52. A pressure roll 53 maintains a tight pressure against cable 16A and roll 52. Likewise, a second pressure roll 54 maintains a firm pressure against cable 16 and roll 50.

OPERATION The operation is best illustrated by referring to all of the figures but in particular to FIG. I. As horizontal drill 13 forces its way into formation 10, cable 16A will be pulled by the horizontal drill. As the cable is pulled, roll 52 will turn. Any rotation of roll 52 will be transmitted through flexible cable 51 to roll 50, which will likewise rotate causing a slacking in tension of cable 11. As cable 11 slacks in tension, switch 34 will close, applying power through power source 31 to the drive motor and wheel 30. Signal source 14 will then move following the movement of horizontal drill 13. In the above operation then, the distance d will always be known. As the signal is being transmitted from antenna 15, loop antenna 20 contained in the horizontal drill instrument package 19 will continue to seek the angular direction (b between the horizontal drill and the signal generating antenna 15. When 4), is determined and d is determined, the distance a which represents the distance of the horizontal drill from the signal source,

can then be determined. Since the tangent of d), is equal to Li /d such information can be easily calculated and corrections as necessary applied to the horizontal drill to cause it to drill so as to maintain a constant distance between borehole l1 and borehole 12. Such a control system is completely described in application 419,157, filed Nov. 26, 1973, titled Control System for a Drilling Apparatus, by Henry A. Bourne, Jr., and Rondon L. Schroeder, and assigned to the assignee of this invention. The control system basically comprises a deflection unit 16 which can be positioned around the axis of drill 13 to 360. As the drill requires deflection, the roll control rotates the deflection unit 9 in a desired direction; the deflection unit then is pressed against the borehole wall, causing pressure on the drill in the direction desired. The cable 16A is coupled to the drive propulsion unit portion 21. Since portion 23 of propulsion unit 21 is coupled through shaft 25 directly to instrument package 19, the cable will move whenever the instrument package moves, thus always maintaining a known distance between the terminus of cable 16A and cable 16.

The drilling apparatus can be made to drill substantially parallel with the previously bored hole 11 by comparing the null angle (b of the second loop antenna with the null angle 11 of the first antenna. Both antennae can be fixed in position so that (1) and (1) provide a parallel hole with a predetermined distance (1,. The drill operator will then maintain the drill so that the null conditions are maintained.

lt is obvious, of course, that other systems can be used to couple the roller 52 to roller 50 so that the same amount of cable is played out into both holes. For example, an electrical servo controlled system can measure the cable being played out in 16A and transfer electrically the information to roll 50. Roll 50 can then be operated to a simple circle system so that it will play out the same mount of cable 16. It is further obvious, of course, that the signal generating means 14 can be either advanced in the hole further than antenna 20 or behind antenna 20, and the system will function equally well.

It is obvious that changes can be made in the apparatus herein disclosed and still be within the spirit of the invention as described in the specification in the appended claims.

What we claim is:

1. A method for drilling a second elongated horizontal borehole substantially parallel to a first drilled horizontal borehole comprising:

a. inserting a horizontal drill into the ground along an axis parallel to a drilled hole and spaced from said first hole;

b. positioning a signal generating means in said first hole a known distance with respect to said horizontal drill;

c. maintaining said known distance along the axis of said first hole as said second hole is drilled;

d. receiving said generated signal on said drill;

e. calculating the distance of said signal generated from said receiver; and

f. controlling said horizontal drill in accordance with said calculation to maintain a predetermined distance between said drill and said signal generating means.

2. A method as described in claim 1 wherein said signal generating means is positioned in said first hole equal to the distance said receiving means is positioned in said hole being drilled.

3. A method as described in claim 1 wherein said signal generating means is maintained a known distance with respect to said receiving means in said borehole being drilled.

4. Apparatus for drilling a second elongated horizontal borehole substantially parallel to a first drilled horizontal borehole comprising:

a. means for inserting a signal means in said first borehole;

b. horizontal drilling means;

c. means for propelling said horizontal drill means into the ground along an axis parallel to said first drilled borehole to form a second elongated horizontal borehole;

d. signal means in said horizontal drill means;

e. means for generating a signal in one signal means and receiving said generated signal in said remaining signal means; and

f. means for maintaining said first signal means a predetermined distance in said drilled borehole with respect to the position of said second signal means in said second borehole.

5. An apparatus as described in claim 4 wherein said signal is generated by said first-mentioned signal means and wherein said signal is received by said secondmentioned signal means.

6. An apparatus as described in claim 4 wherein said second-mentioned signal means comprises:

a. a directional antenna;

b. means coupled to said directional antenna for de termining the direction of said horizontal drill axis from said first-mentioned signal means; and

c. means for maintaining said first signal means a predetermined distance from said second signal means, whereby the angle between said first and second signal means can be determined and whereby the linear distance between said first and second receiving means can be determined so that the distance between said borehole containing said first signal means and the borehole being drilled containing said second signal means can be calculated.

7. An apparatus as described in claim 4 wherein said second-mentioned signal means comprises:

a. first and second directional antenna means mounted on said drilling apparatus and spaced apart a predetermined distance; and,

b. means coupled to each of said first and second directional antenna to determine its orientation with respect to said signal means in said first hole.

8. An apparatus as described in claim 4 wherein said means for maintaining said first signal means a predetermined distance in said drilled borehole with respect to the position of said second signal means in said second borehole comprises:

a. a first reel having a first line stored thereon;

b. a second reel having a second line stored thereon;

c. means for connecting said first line to said firstmentioned signal means and means for connecting said second line to said second-mentioned signal means; and,

(1. means for metering the lengths of said first and second lines played out by said respective first and second reels.

9. An apparatus as described in claim 8 wherein said first-mentioned signal means comprises a housing; means for propelling said housing along said borehole; and, means for attaching said first line to said housing.

10. An apparatus as described in claim 7 wherein said means for attaching said first line to said housing comsion means.

232 33 i v UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE -CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3 55,355 Dated December 10, 1971+ InventoflsH. Douglas Dahl and Tibor O. Edmond,

It is certified thaterror appeare in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

; Column 5, line 6 "7" shouldbe Signed and sealed this 4th day 'of March 1975.-

(SEAL) ACCESC:

C. MARSHALL DANN RUTH C. MASON Commissioner of Patents Attesting; Officer and Trademarks 23 UNITED STATES PATENT omen CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION ww 5,855,185 Dated December 10, 197A InventoflsH. Douglas Dahl and Tibor O. Edmond It is certified that error appears in the above-identified intent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

- Column 5, line "7" should be --9--.

Signed and sealed this 4th day of March 1975.

(SEAL) Attest:

C. MARSHALL DANN RUZH C. MASON Commissioner of Patents Attesting Officer and Trademarks

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3285350 *Apr 23, 1964Nov 15, 1966Keller Henderson JohnMethod and apparatus for controllably drilling off-vertical holes
US3406766 *Jul 7, 1966Oct 22, 1968Keller Henderson JohnMethod and devices for interconnecting subterranean boreholes
US3529682 *Oct 3, 1968Sep 22, 1970Bell Telephone Labor IncLocation detection and guidance systems for burrowing device
US3578807 *Nov 5, 1968May 18, 1971Barrett Arthur LMethod of steering
US3589454 *Dec 27, 1968Jun 29, 1971Bell Telephone Labor IncMole guidance system
US3746106 *Dec 27, 1971Jul 17, 1973Goldak Co IncBoring bit locator
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4072200 *May 12, 1976Feb 7, 1978Morris Fred JSurveying of subterranean magnetic bodies from an adjacent off-vertical borehole
US4167290 *Oct 4, 1977Sep 11, 1979Tekken Construction Co. Ltd.Shield type hydraulic tunnel boring machine
US4261617 *Jan 23, 1979Apr 14, 1981Vereinigte Osterreichische Eisen-Und Stahlwerke - Alpine Montan AktiengesellschaftMethod of controlling the working motion of a cutting tool of a tunnel-driving machine over the breast, and apparatus for carrying out the method
US4391336 *Nov 24, 1980Jul 5, 1983Conoco Inc.Acoustic system to guide a coal seam auger
US4523651 *Dec 17, 1979Jun 18, 1985Conoco Inc.Coal auger guidance system
US4646277 *Apr 12, 1985Feb 24, 1987Gas Research InstituteControl for guiding a boring tool
US4674579 *Mar 7, 1985Jun 23, 1987Flowmole CorporationMethod and apparatus for installment of underground utilities
US4714118 *May 22, 1986Dec 22, 1987Flowmole CorporationTechnique for steering and monitoring the orientation of a powered underground boring device
US4787463 *Apr 18, 1988Nov 29, 1988Flowmole CorporationMethod and apparatus for installment of underground utilities
US4806869 *May 22, 1986Feb 21, 1989Flow Industries, Inc.An above-ground arrangement for and method of locating a discrete in ground boring device
US4856600 *Oct 21, 1988Aug 15, 1989Flowmole CorporationTechnique for providing an underground tunnel utilizing a powered boring device
US4867255 *May 20, 1988Sep 19, 1989Flowmole CorporationTechnique for steering a downhole hammer
US4875014 *Jul 20, 1988Oct 17, 1989Tensor, Inc.System and method for locating an underground probe having orthogonally oriented magnetometers
US4896733 *Oct 21, 1988Jan 30, 1990Flowmole CorporationTechnique for providing an underground tunnel utilizing a powered boring device
US4921055 *Dec 19, 1986May 1, 1990Kayes Allan GSoil displacement hammer
US5020860 *Feb 26, 1990Jun 4, 1991Consolidation Coal CompanyMethods and apparatus for maintaining longwall face alignment
US5131477 *Jan 16, 1991Jul 21, 1992Bp Exploration (Alaska) Inc.Method and apparatus for preventing drilling of a new well into an existing well
US5264795 *Jun 18, 1990Nov 23, 1993The Charles Machine Works, Inc.System transmitting and receiving digital and analog information for use in locating concealed conductors
US5413184 *Oct 1, 1993May 9, 1995Landers; CarlMethod of and apparatus for horizontal well drilling
US5485089 *Oct 8, 1993Jan 16, 1996Vector Magnetics, Inc.Method and apparatus for measuring distance and direction by movable magnetic field source
US5495237 *Dec 6, 1993Feb 27, 1996Akishima Laboratories (Mitsui Zosen) Inc.Measuring tool for collecting down hole information and metering valve for producing mud-pulse used in the same
US5512830 *Nov 9, 1993Apr 30, 1996Vector Magnetics, Inc.Measurement of vector components of static field perturbations for borehole location
US5513710 *Nov 7, 1994May 7, 1996Vector Magnetics, Inc.Solenoid guide system for horizontal boreholes
US5585726 *May 26, 1995Dec 17, 1996Utilx CorporationElectronic guidance system and method for locating a discrete in-ground boring device
US5657826 *Nov 17, 1995Aug 19, 1997Vector Magnetics, Inc.Guidance system for drilling boreholes
US5725059 *Dec 29, 1995Mar 10, 1998Vector Magnetics, Inc.Method and apparatus for producing parallel boreholes
US5853056 *Sep 26, 1994Dec 29, 1998Landers; Carl W.Method of and apparatus for horizontal well drilling
US5960370 *Aug 8, 1997Sep 28, 1999Scientific Drilling InternationalMethod to determine local variations of the earth's magnetic field and location of the source thereof
US6189629Sep 14, 1998Feb 20, 2001Mcleod Roderick D.Lateral jet drilling system
US6257353Feb 23, 1999Jul 10, 2001Lti Joint VentureHorizontal drilling method and apparatus
US6263984Jan 10, 2000Jul 24, 2001William G. Buckman, Sr.Method and apparatus for jet drilling drainholes from wells
US6283230Mar 1, 1999Sep 4, 2001Jasper N. PetersMethod and apparatus for lateral well drilling utilizing a rotating nozzle
US6378629Aug 21, 2000Apr 30, 2002Saturn Machine & Welding Co., Inc.Boring apparatus
US6412578Jan 17, 2001Jul 2, 2002Dhdt, Inc.Boring apparatus
US6466020Mar 19, 2001Oct 15, 2002Vector Magnetics, LlcElectromagnetic borehole surveying method
US6550553Apr 5, 2002Apr 22, 2003Dhdt, Inc.Boring apparatus
US6578636Feb 16, 2001Jun 17, 2003Performance Research & Drilling, LlcHorizontal directional drilling in wells
US6588517May 16, 2002Jul 8, 2003Dhdt, Inc.Boring apparatus
US6889781Jul 3, 2002May 10, 2005Performance Research & Drilling, LlcHorizontal directional drilling in wells
US6964303Jul 3, 2002Nov 15, 2005Performance Research & Drilling, LlcHorizontal directional drilling in wells
US6971457Jun 13, 2003Dec 6, 2005Batesville Services, Inc.Moldable fabric
US7243719 *Jun 7, 2004Jul 17, 2007Pathfinder Energy Services, Inc.Control method for downhole steering tool
US7584788May 22, 2007Sep 8, 2009Smith International Inc.Control method for downhole steering tool
US7644765Oct 19, 2007Jan 12, 2010Shell Oil CompanyHeating tar sands formations while controlling pressure
US7656309 *Jul 6, 2006Feb 2, 2010Hall David RSystem and method for sharing information between downhole drill strings
US7673681Oct 19, 2007Mar 9, 2010Shell Oil CompanyTreating tar sands formations with karsted zones
US7673786Apr 20, 2007Mar 9, 2010Shell Oil CompanyWelding shield for coupling heaters
US7677310Oct 19, 2007Mar 16, 2010Shell Oil CompanyCreating and maintaining a gas cap in tar sands formations
US7677314Oct 19, 2007Mar 16, 2010Shell Oil CompanyMethod of condensing vaporized water in situ to treat tar sands formations
US7681647Mar 23, 2010Shell Oil CompanyMethod of producing drive fluid in situ in tar sands formations
US7683296Mar 23, 2010Shell Oil CompanyAdjusting alloy compositions for selected properties in temperature limited heaters
US7703513Oct 19, 2007Apr 27, 2010Shell Oil CompanyWax barrier for use with in situ processes for treating formations
US7703548Aug 2, 2007Apr 27, 2010Schlumberger Technology CorporationMagnetic ranging while drilling parallel wells
US7717171Oct 19, 2007May 18, 2010Shell Oil CompanyMoving hydrocarbons through portions of tar sands formations with a fluid
US7730945Oct 19, 2007Jun 8, 2010Shell Oil CompanyUsing geothermal energy to heat a portion of a formation for an in situ heat treatment process
US7730946Oct 19, 2007Jun 8, 2010Shell Oil CompanyTreating tar sands formations with dolomite
US7730947Oct 19, 2007Jun 8, 2010Shell Oil CompanyCreating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations
US7785427Apr 20, 2007Aug 31, 2010Shell Oil CompanyHigh strength alloys
US7793722Apr 20, 2007Sep 14, 2010Shell Oil CompanyNon-ferromagnetic overburden casing
US7798220Apr 18, 2008Sep 21, 2010Shell Oil CompanyIn situ heat treatment of a tar sands formation after drive process treatment
US7798221Sep 21, 2010Shell Oil CompanyIn situ recovery from a hydrocarbon containing formation
US7831134Apr 21, 2006Nov 9, 2010Shell Oil CompanyGrouped exposed metal heaters
US7832484Apr 18, 2008Nov 16, 2010Shell Oil CompanyMolten salt as a heat transfer fluid for heating a subsurface formation
US7841401Oct 19, 2007Nov 30, 2010Shell Oil CompanyGas injection to inhibit migration during an in situ heat treatment process
US7841408Apr 18, 2008Nov 30, 2010Shell Oil CompanyIn situ heat treatment from multiple layers of a tar sands formation
US7841425Nov 30, 2010Shell Oil CompanyDrilling subsurface wellbores with cutting structures
US7845411Dec 7, 2010Shell Oil CompanyIn situ heat treatment process utilizing a closed loop heating system
US7849922Dec 14, 2010Shell Oil CompanyIn situ recovery from residually heated sections in a hydrocarbon containing formation
US7860377Apr 21, 2006Dec 28, 2010Shell Oil CompanySubsurface connection methods for subsurface heaters
US7866385Apr 20, 2007Jan 11, 2011Shell Oil CompanyPower systems utilizing the heat of produced formation fluid
US7866386Oct 13, 2008Jan 11, 2011Shell Oil CompanyIn situ oxidation of subsurface formations
US7866388Jan 11, 2011Shell Oil CompanyHigh temperature methods for forming oxidizer fuel
US7912358Apr 20, 2007Mar 22, 2011Shell Oil CompanyAlternate energy source usage for in situ heat treatment processes
US7931086Apr 18, 2008Apr 26, 2011Shell Oil CompanyHeating systems for heating subsurface formations
US7942197Apr 21, 2006May 17, 2011Shell Oil CompanyMethods and systems for producing fluid from an in situ conversion process
US7942203May 17, 2011Shell Oil CompanyThermal processes for subsurface formations
US7950453Apr 18, 2008May 31, 2011Shell Oil CompanyDownhole burner systems and methods for heating subsurface formations
US7986869Apr 21, 2006Jul 26, 2011Shell Oil CompanyVarying properties along lengths of temperature limited heaters
US8011451 *Sep 6, 2011Shell Oil CompanyRanging methods for developing wellbores in subsurface formations
US8027571Sep 27, 2011Shell Oil CompanyIn situ conversion process systems utilizing wellbores in at least two regions of a formation
US8042610Oct 25, 2011Shell Oil CompanyParallel heater system for subsurface formations
US8070840Apr 21, 2006Dec 6, 2011Shell Oil CompanyTreatment of gas from an in situ conversion process
US8083813Dec 27, 2011Shell Oil CompanyMethods of producing transportation fuel
US8113272Oct 13, 2008Feb 14, 2012Shell Oil CompanyThree-phase heaters with common overburden sections for heating subsurface formations
US8146661Oct 13, 2008Apr 3, 2012Shell Oil CompanyCryogenic treatment of gas
US8146669Oct 13, 2008Apr 3, 2012Shell Oil CompanyMulti-step heater deployment in a subsurface formation
US8151880Dec 9, 2010Apr 10, 2012Shell Oil CompanyMethods of making transportation fuel
US8151907Apr 10, 2009Apr 10, 2012Shell Oil CompanyDual motor systems and non-rotating sensors for use in developing wellbores in subsurface formations
US8162059Apr 24, 2012Shell Oil CompanyInduction heaters used to heat subsurface formations
US8162405Apr 24, 2012Shell Oil CompanyUsing tunnels for treating subsurface hydrocarbon containing formations
US8172335May 8, 2012Shell Oil CompanyElectrical current flow between tunnels for use in heating subsurface hydrocarbon containing formations
US8177305Apr 10, 2009May 15, 2012Shell Oil CompanyHeater connections in mines and tunnels for use in treating subsurface hydrocarbon containing formations
US8191630Apr 28, 2010Jun 5, 2012Shell Oil CompanyCreating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations
US8192682Apr 26, 2010Jun 5, 2012Shell Oil CompanyHigh strength alloys
US8196658Jun 12, 2012Shell Oil CompanyIrregular spacing of heat sources for treating hydrocarbon containing formations
US8220539Jul 17, 2012Shell Oil CompanyControlling hydrogen pressure in self-regulating nuclear reactors used to treat a subsurface formation
US8224163Oct 24, 2003Jul 17, 2012Shell Oil CompanyVariable frequency temperature limited heaters
US8224164Oct 24, 2003Jul 17, 2012Shell Oil CompanyInsulated conductor temperature limited heaters
US8224165Jul 17, 2012Shell Oil CompanyTemperature limited heater utilizing non-ferromagnetic conductor
US8225866Jul 21, 2010Jul 24, 2012Shell Oil CompanyIn situ recovery from a hydrocarbon containing formation
US8230927May 16, 2011Jul 31, 2012Shell Oil CompanyMethods and systems for producing fluid from an in situ conversion process
US8233782Jul 31, 2012Shell Oil CompanyGrouped exposed metal heaters
US8238730Aug 7, 2012Shell Oil CompanyHigh voltage temperature limited heaters
US8240774Aug 14, 2012Shell Oil CompanySolution mining and in situ treatment of nahcolite beds
US8256512Oct 9, 2009Sep 4, 2012Shell Oil CompanyMovable heaters for treating subsurface hydrocarbon containing formations
US8261832Sep 11, 2012Shell Oil CompanyHeating subsurface formations with fluids
US8267170Sep 18, 2012Shell Oil CompanyOffset barrier wells in subsurface formations
US8267185Sep 18, 2012Shell Oil CompanyCirculated heated transfer fluid systems used to treat a subsurface formation
US8272455Sep 25, 2012Shell Oil CompanyMethods for forming wellbores in heated formations
US8276661Oct 2, 2012Shell Oil CompanyHeating subsurface formations by oxidizing fuel on a fuel carrier
US8281861Oct 9, 2012Shell Oil CompanyCirculated heated transfer fluid heating of subsurface hydrocarbon formations
US8327681Dec 11, 2012Shell Oil CompanyWellbore manufacturing processes for in situ heat treatment processes
US8327932Apr 9, 2010Dec 11, 2012Shell Oil CompanyRecovering energy from a subsurface formation
US8353347Oct 9, 2009Jan 15, 2013Shell Oil CompanyDeployment of insulated conductors for treating subsurface formations
US8355623Jan 15, 2013Shell Oil CompanyTemperature limited heaters with high power factors
US8381815Apr 18, 2008Feb 26, 2013Shell Oil CompanyProduction from multiple zones of a tar sands formation
US8434555Apr 9, 2010May 7, 2013Shell Oil CompanyIrregular pattern treatment of a subsurface formation
US8448707May 28, 2013Shell Oil CompanyNon-conducting heater casings
US8459359Apr 18, 2008Jun 11, 2013Shell Oil CompanyTreating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones
US8479841 *Feb 7, 2008Jul 9, 2013Statoilhydro AsaAssembly for drilling and logging, method for drilling and logging and device for electro pulse drilling
US8485252Jul 11, 2012Jul 16, 2013Shell Oil CompanyIn situ recovery from a hydrocarbon containing formation
US8536497Oct 13, 2008Sep 17, 2013Shell Oil CompanyMethods for forming long subsurface heaters
US8555971May 31, 2012Oct 15, 2013Shell Oil CompanyTreating tar sands formations with dolomite
US8562078Nov 25, 2009Oct 22, 2013Shell Oil CompanyHydrocarbon production from mines and tunnels used in treating subsurface hydrocarbon containing formations
US8579031May 17, 2011Nov 12, 2013Shell Oil CompanyThermal processes for subsurface formations
US8606091Oct 20, 2006Dec 10, 2013Shell Oil CompanySubsurface heaters with low sulfidation rates
US8608249Apr 26, 2010Dec 17, 2013Shell Oil CompanyIn situ thermal processing of an oil shale formation
US8627887Dec 8, 2008Jan 14, 2014Shell Oil CompanyIn situ recovery from a hydrocarbon containing formation
US8631866Apr 8, 2011Jan 21, 2014Shell Oil CompanyLeak detection in circulated fluid systems for heating subsurface formations
US8636323Nov 25, 2009Jan 28, 2014Shell Oil CompanyMines and tunnels for use in treating subsurface hydrocarbon containing formations
US8662175Apr 18, 2008Mar 4, 2014Shell Oil CompanyVarying properties of in situ heat treatment of a tar sands formation based on assessed viscosities
US8701768Apr 8, 2011Apr 22, 2014Shell Oil CompanyMethods for treating hydrocarbon formations
US8701769Apr 8, 2011Apr 22, 2014Shell Oil CompanyMethods for treating hydrocarbon formations based on geology
US8739874Apr 8, 2011Jun 3, 2014Shell Oil CompanyMethods for heating with slots in hydrocarbon formations
US8752904Apr 10, 2009Jun 17, 2014Shell Oil CompanyHeated fluid flow in mines and tunnels used in heating subsurface hydrocarbon containing formations
US8789586Jul 12, 2013Jul 29, 2014Shell Oil CompanyIn situ recovery from a hydrocarbon containing formation
US8791396Apr 18, 2008Jul 29, 2014Shell Oil CompanyFloating insulated conductors for heating subsurface formations
US8820406Apr 8, 2011Sep 2, 2014Shell Oil CompanyElectrodes for electrical current flow heating of subsurface formations with conductive material in wellbore
US8833453Apr 8, 2011Sep 16, 2014Shell Oil CompanyElectrodes for electrical current flow heating of subsurface formations with tapered copper thickness
US8851170Apr 9, 2010Oct 7, 2014Shell Oil CompanyHeater assisted fluid treatment of a subsurface formation
US8857506May 24, 2013Oct 14, 2014Shell Oil CompanyAlternate energy source usage methods for in situ heat treatment processes
US8881806Oct 9, 2009Nov 11, 2014Shell Oil CompanySystems and methods for treating a subsurface formation with electrical conductors
US9016370Apr 6, 2012Apr 28, 2015Shell Oil CompanyPartial solution mining of hydrocarbon containing layers prior to in situ heat treatment
US9022109Jan 21, 2014May 5, 2015Shell Oil CompanyLeak detection in circulated fluid systems for heating subsurface formations
US9022118Oct 9, 2009May 5, 2015Shell Oil CompanyDouble insulated heaters for treating subsurface formations
US9030911 *Dec 3, 2008May 12, 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethod and system for delineating a second wellbore from a first wellbore
US9033042Apr 8, 2011May 19, 2015Shell Oil CompanyForming bitumen barriers in subsurface hydrocarbon formations
US9051829Oct 9, 2009Jun 9, 2015Shell Oil CompanyPerforated electrical conductors for treating subsurface formations
US9127523Apr 8, 2011Sep 8, 2015Shell Oil CompanyBarrier methods for use in subsurface hydrocarbon formations
US9127538Apr 8, 2011Sep 8, 2015Shell Oil CompanyMethodologies for treatment of hydrocarbon formations using staged pyrolyzation
US9129728Oct 9, 2009Sep 8, 2015Shell Oil CompanySystems and methods of forming subsurface wellbores
US9181780Apr 18, 2008Nov 10, 2015Shell Oil CompanyControlling and assessing pressure conditions during treatment of tar sands formations
US9309755Oct 4, 2012Apr 12, 2016Shell Oil CompanyThermal expansion accommodation for circulated fluid systems used to heat subsurface formations
US20040007391 *Jun 13, 2003Jan 15, 2004Dhdt., Inc.Boring apparatus
US20050269082 *Jun 7, 2004Dec 8, 2005Pathfinder Energy Services, Inc.Control method for downhole steering tool
US20070137857 *Apr 21, 2006Jun 21, 2007Vinegar Harold JLow temperature monitoring system for subsurface barriers
US20070221375 *May 22, 2007Sep 27, 2007Pathfinder Energy Services, Inc.Control method for downhole steering tool
US20080024318 *Jul 6, 2006Jan 31, 2008Hall David RSystem and Method for Sharing Information between Downhole Drill Strings
US20090194333 *Oct 13, 2008Aug 6, 2009Macdonald DuncanRanging methods for developing wellbores in subsurface formations
US20090296522 *Dec 3, 2009Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethod and system for delineating a second wellbore from a first wellbore
US20100071904 *Mar 25, 2010Shell Oil CompanyHydrocarbon production from mines and tunnels used in treating subsurface hydrocarbon containing formations
US20100147521 *Oct 9, 2009Jun 17, 2010Xueying XiePerforated electrical conductors for treating subsurface formations
US20100212962 *Feb 7, 2008Aug 26, 2010Tage RostenAssembly for drilling and logging, method for drilling and logging and device for electro pulse drilling
USRE36569 *Nov 12, 1996Feb 15, 2000Vector Magnetics, Inc.Method and apparatus for measuring distance and direction by movable magnetic field source
EP0044706A2 *Jul 15, 1981Jan 27, 1982Dickinson III, Ben Wade OakesMethod and apparatus for forming and using a bore hole
EP0246886A1 *May 20, 1987Nov 25, 1987Flowmole CorporationMethod of and apparatus for locating a discrete inground boring device
EP0913552A2 *Oct 23, 1998May 6, 1999AT&T Corp.Method and apparatus for establishing a borehole parallel to an existing underground cable
EP1666698A1 *Sep 24, 1998Jun 7, 2006Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Downhole signal source location
WO1981001168A1 *Oct 17, 1980Apr 30, 1981Structural Dynamics LtdMonitoring equipment for drilling operations
WO1982001908A1 *Nov 24, 1980Jun 10, 1982Fowler James CAn acoustic system to guide a coal seam auger
WO1990001104A1 *Jul 19, 1989Feb 8, 1990Tensor, Inc.A system and method for locating an underground probe
WO2003036043A2 *Oct 24, 2002May 1, 2003Shell Internationale Research Maatschappij B.V.Forming openings in a hydrocarbon containing formation using magnetic tracking
WO2003036043A3 *Oct 24, 2002Aug 21, 2003Shell Oil CoForming openings in a hydrocarbon containing formation using magnetic tracking
Classifications
U.S. Classification340/853.4, 175/61, 340/853.6, 175/73, 175/94
International ClassificationE21B47/02, E21B7/04
Cooperative ClassificationE21B47/02216, E21B7/046, E21B47/02, E21B7/04
European ClassificationE21B47/022M, E21B7/04, E21B7/04B, E21B47/02
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
May 16, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: CONSOLIDATION COAL COMPANY, A CORP OF DE.
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST. SUBJECT TO LICENSE RECITED;ASSIGNOR:CONOCO, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004923/0180
Effective date: 19870227