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Publication numberUS3853957 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 10, 1974
Filing dateMay 7, 1968
Priority dateMay 7, 1968
Also published asDE1923085A1
Publication numberUS 3853957 A, US 3853957A, US-A-3853957, US3853957 A, US3853957A
InventorsAngelo A D, W Mckellin
Original AssigneePennwalt Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Oxy substituted peroxyketals
US 3853957 A
Abstract
Peroxyketals having two peroxy groups attached to the same carbon atom of an aliphatic group having at least three carbon atoms, and at least one hydroxyl, acyloxy, substituted acyloxy, alkoxycarbonyloxy, carbamoyloxy, or substituted carbamoyloxy group. These peroxyketals are useful chemical intermediates, free radical polymerization initiators and crosslinking agent.
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United States Patent [19 DAngelo et al.

[ OXY SUBSTITUTED PEROXYKETALS [75] Inventors: Antonio Joseph DAngelo; Wilbur H.

McKellin, both of Buffalo, NY.

[73] Assignee: Pennwalt Corporation, Philadelphia,

[22] Filed: May 7, 1968 [21] App]. No.: 727,336

R, 488 CD, 514

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,455,569 12/1948 Dickey 260/610 R Dec. 10, 1974 3,296,184 1/1967 Portolanie et a1 260/610 R Primary Examiner-Bernard Helfin Assistant ExaminerW. B. Lone Attorney, Agent, or FirmPlumley & Tyner 57] ABSTRACT Peroxyketals having two peroxy groups attached to the same carbon atom of an aliphatic group having at least three carbon atoms, and at least one hydroxyl, acyloxy, substituted acyloxy, alkoxycarbonyloxy, carbamoyloxy, or substituted carbamoyloxy group. These peroxyketals are useful chemical intermediates, free radical polymerization initiators and crosslinking agent.

Examples 2,2-Bis(t-butylperoxy)propyl caproate. 3 ,3-Bis( t-butylperoxy 1 -butanol.

7 Claims, N0 Drawings OXY SUBSTITUTED PEROXYKETALS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. The Field of the Invention This invention relates to substituted peroxyketals. Particularly the invention relates to peroxyketals substituted by hydroxy and/or acyloxy groups. Also the invention relates to the preparation of these peroxyketals.

2. Description of the Prior Art Dickey US. Pat. No. 2,455,569, discloses certain peroxyketals.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION These new compounds have two peroxy groups joined to a common carbon of an aliphatic group hav-; ing at least three carbon atoms and at least one group from the class consisting of hydroxy and acyloxy. The hydroxy group or acyloxy group is joined to a carbon atom which is free of substituent peroxy groups.

The substituted'peroxyketals of the invention have the formula:

(I) IIILY R4O 0-0-0 o-w where:

a. R and R are aliphatic or cycloaliphatic biradicals;

b. R CR together may form a ring;

ganic bromine compounds in flame retardant compositions; as crosslinking or curing agents in unsaturated polyester resin compositions; as crosslinking agents; and as chemical intermediates in the general manner of known peroxyketals.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION AND EXAMPLES In Formula 1, R and R are the same or different aliphatic or cycloaliphatic biradicals. R C,R together may form a ring which is substituted by Y, Z, and two peroxy (-00-) groups. R 'is an aliphatic, cycloaliphatic or aryl radical. R and R are the same or different H, aliphatic or cycloaliphatic radicals.

The aliphatic radical includes substitution by aryl radicals araliphatic radicals and cycloaliphatic radicals. The cycloaliphatic radical includes substitution by aliphatic and by aryl radicals. The aryl radicals may be substituted by aliphatic and by cycloaliphatic radicals. Both cycloaliphatic and aryl radicals may be single ring, such as, phenyland cyclohexyl, or connected rings, such as biphenyl, binaphthyl, bicyclopropyl, bicyclopentyl, or fused rings such as naphthyl, decahydronaphthyl. It is to be understood that the sustituents should not interfere with the desired reaction. In general halogen, oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen substituents or groups containing these do not interfere.

.Commonly R and R each have 1-10 carbon atoms in the aliphatic biradical and 3-12 carbon atoms in the cycloaliphatic biradical. Usually R and R are alkylene, phenalkylene, and cycloalkylene and the corresponding halo substituted radicals.

Commonly R has 1-18 carbon atoms in the aliphatic radical, 3-12 carbon atoms in the cycloaliphatic radical, or 6-12 carbon atoms in the aryl radical. Preferably R is alkyl having 1-12 carbon atoms, phenalkyl having 7-12 carbon atoms, cycloalkyl having 4-8 carbon atoms, or phenyl having 6-12 carbon atoms and c. Y is H, OH or fl h VO Rii;

d. Z is OH or O 40 j f ff e. R is an aliphatic, cycloaliphaticor aryl radical; f. R, and R are H, aliphatic or cycloaliphatic radicals; g. W is (i) R or (ii) when R, is H, W can be RIY R1Y dI-OH, or -OOH; v IIIQZ BQZ and h. when Y and Z are each OH, W cannot be C(- 1 )(R2 )a 0r. 1Y)( 2Z)( I-l)- Illustrative compounds of the invention are:

3 ,3Dihydroperoxy-Zmethylbutyl pivalate. 4,4-Bis( t-butylperoxy l pentanol. l ,3Diacetyloxy-Z,2-bis(t-butylperoxy)propane.

4,4-Bis(pinanylperoxy)pentyl benzoate. 5,8Dihydroperoxy-S,8-dimethyl-3.,6,7,l0tetraoxa- 2,1 l-dodecadione.

UTILITY The compounds of this invention are useful as sources of free radicals which can be used to initiate the polymerization of monomers; as synergists with orthe corresponding halo substituted radicals.

Commonly R and R are the same or different radicals H, aliphatic having 4-12 carbon atoms, or cycloaliphatic radicals having 4-12 carbon atoms. Preferably R and R are the same or different radicals H, aliphatic hydrocarbon having 4-10 carbon atoms, or cycloaliphatic hydrocarbon having 4-10 carbon atoms and each radical affords a tertiary carbon atom which t-carbon atom is joined to a peroxy oxygen atom, for example The hydroxyproducts of this invention can be prepared by the reduction of peroxyketalcarboxylic acids and esters and by the saponification of aceyloxyperoxyketals. The acyloxyperoxyketals are also a new class of peroxy compounds which can be prepared by the reaction of acyloxyketones with hydrogen peroxide or hytone,

droperoxides in thepresence of strong acidic catalysts.

To illustrate thetype of products available from the ketones of the representative list above, the reaction of acetonyl acetate with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of acidic catalysts gives a mixture of compounds commonly known as ketone peroxides. Amongthe components of this mixture, structures-such as 0 OHPg CHQ-Q-ii-Gm are to be expected. lf, on the other hand, the reaction is carried out with t-butyl hydroperoxide, the simple structure iK ah 0 can be obtained. a

Representative perketalesters (and perketalacids) which can be reduced to the hydroxyperketals of this invention include methyl 3,3-bis(t-butylperoxy)butyrate, ethyl .3,3-bis(t-butylperoxy)butyrate, n-butyl 4,4- bis-(t-butylperoxy)valerate, n-butyl 5,5-bis.(tbutylper0Xy)-hexoate, n-butyl 6,6-bis(t-butylperoxy)- hevtanqater t y 4k -b ttl s smhqg wie ate, n-butyl 4,4-bis(t-amylperoxy)valerate, n-butyl 4,4- bis(pinanyiperoxy)valerate, "ethyl 3-{ 2- [l,l-bis(tbutylperoxy)cyclohexyl]} propionate, n-butyl 4,4-bis(cumylperoxy)valerate, 2,2-bis(t-butylperoxy)- propyl acetate, 2,2-bis(t-butylperoxy)propyl caproate, l ,3-bisacetoxy-2,2-bis( t-butylperoxy )propane, 2,2-

bis(chloro-t-butylperoxy)propyl acetate,

- 2,2-bis(t-butylperoxy)propyl 9-acetoxymethyl- 3,3,6,6,9-pentamethyll ,2,7,8-tetraoxayclononane.

By the reduction of diethyl 4,4-bis(t-butylperoxy)- heptanedioate, 4,4-bis( t-butylperoxy)- l ,7-heptanediol is obtained. By the reduction of butyl 4,4-bis(tamylperoxy )-valerate, 4,4-bis( t-amylperoxy l ;pentanol is obtained. By the reduction of butyl 4,4- bis(pinanylperoxy)valerate, 4,4-bis-pinanylperoxyl pentanol is obtained. By the reduction of 2,2-bis-(t-butylperoxy)propyl acetate, 2-,2-bis(tbutylperoxy)-l-propanol is obtained. By the saponification of 2,2-bis(chloro-t-butylperoxy)propyl acetate, 2,2- bis(chloro-t-butylperoxy)-l-propanol is obtained. By the reduction of ethyl 3-[2-[l,l-bis(tbutylperoxy )cyclohexyl] lpropionate, 3-[2-[ l l -bis(tbutylperdxykyclohexyl]]-l-propanol is obtained. By

the reduction of 2,2-bis( t-butylperoxy)propyl 4,4-bis( tbutylperoxy)- valerate, a mixture of 2,2-bis(t-butylperoxy l -propanol and 4,4-bis(t-butylperoxy l pentanol is obtained. By the saponification of 4- pivaloxy-3-methyl-2,2-bis(t-butylperoxy)butane, 3- methyl-2,2-bis(t-butylperoxy)-4-butanol is obtained. By the reduction of butyl 4,4-bis(cumylperoxy)valerate, 4,4-bis(cumylperoxy )-l-pentanol is obtained.

Acidic catalysts typical of those useful in preparing the peroxyketalesters include: sulfuric acid, phosphoric acid, p-toluenesulfonic acid, methanesulfonic acid, perchloric acid and strong acid ion exchange resins such as Amberlite 200 and Amberlyst 15. When the peroxyketals are prepared using hydroperoxides they can be reacted further to produce the alcoholic products of this invention where Yd-l or OH, Z OH. If the .ESEWWE! group is formed in the part of the peroxyketalester directly attached to the carbon atome bearing the carbonyl oxygen, the hydroxyperoxyketal can be obtained by treating the peroxyketalester with a reducing agent of the complex metal hydride type such as lighium aluminum hydride and its chemical equivalents (Reduction With Complex Metal Hydrides, Norman G. Gaylord, Interscience Publishers Inc., N.Y., 1956) which are known to reduce esters to alcohols under mild conditions. If, however, the peroxyketal group is in the part of the ester linked to the carbonyl carbon atome thru an oxygen atom, then the hydroxyperketal can be obtained either by simple hydrolysis or saponification or if desired, by reductive cleavage of the ester with the reducing agents indicated above.

Typical hydroperoxides which can be used to prepare the products of this invention include t-butyl hydroperoxide, t-arnyl hydroperoxide, chloro-t-butyl hydroperoxide, l,'l,3,3-tetramethylbutyl hydroperoxide, cumyl hydropemxid, P-mntl. '!x .hy!qwr 2 de P n 5 hydroperoxide, diisopropylbenzene hydroperoxide, 2- methyl-2-hydroperoxy-4-hydroxypentane.

To illustrate some of the general methods of preparing and using the new products of this invention, the following examples are included.

EXAMPLE I A. PREPARATION OF ACETONYL CAPROATE A mixture of 30.2g. (0.22 mole) of sodium caproate, 25 ml. of caproic acid and 18.5g. (0.20 mole) of chloroacetone was stirred and heated at 110-120 C for 5 hours. After cooling to 30C, 25 ml. of pentane was added, the pentane layer decanted and washed with water and 5% sodium hydroxide solution. After drying over anhydrous magnesium sulfate, the pentane was removed under reduced pressure. The product weighing 16.7g. was obtained in 48.5% yield.

B. Preparation of 2,2-Bist(t-butylperoxy)propyl Caproate A mixture of 12.9g. (0.075 mole) of acetonyl caproate, and 19.7g. (0.20 mole) of 90% t-butyl hydroperoxide was stirred at C, while 9.8g. of 77% sulfuric acid was added slowly. The reaction mixture was then stirred at 0C for 4 hours, and the organic layer separated. The produce was washed with water, sodium hydroxide solution and finally with water and then dried over anhydrous magnesium sulfate. The separated product weighed 22.2g. (89% recovery). lodometric assay indicated that the product contained 98% of the desired compound.

EXAMPLE 11 A. Preparation of 4-Pivalyloxy-3methyl-2-butanone hydrous magnesium sulfate. The ether was removed under reduced pressure and 109g. (98% yield) of product recovered.

B. Preparation of 3,3-Dihydroperoxy-2-methylbutyl A mixture of 7.35g. (0.04 mole) of 3-oxo-2- methylbutyl pivalate, (4-pivalyloxy-3-methyl-2- butanone) 5.64g. (0.08 mole) of 50% hydrogen peroxide solution and ml. of ether was stirred at 0C while 0.98g. (0.01 mole) of 95% sulfuric acid was added. After stirring at 0C for 4 hours, the organic layer was separated, washed with saturated ammonium sulfate solution, and water to neutrality. The ether solution.

was dried over anhydrous magnesium sulfate, and the ether removed under reduced pressure.

The product weighed 6.46g. contained 21.6% of the calculated amount of active oxygen by iodometric assay, and was obtained in 15.1% yield.

By further reaction of the 3,3-dihydroperoxy-2- methylbutyl pivalate with 3-oxo-2-methylbutyl pivalate 0 and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of the acidic catalyst, more complex ketone peroxide structures such as 2,2,6,7,l0,l 1,15,15-octamethyl-7, l0- dihydroperoxy-4,8,9, 1 3-tetraoxa-3,14- hexadecanedione O ll H are possible components of the product mixture.

EXAMPLE lll Preparation of 3,3-Bis(t-butylperoxy)-l-butanol O C (CH3); 1 CH CI?CHgCH2OH A solution of 308g. (0.082 mole) of lithium aluminum-hydride dissolved in 250 ml. of ether was stirred at 5-10C, while 28.3g'. (0.1 mole) of methyl 3,3-bis(tbutylperoxy)-butyrate dissolved in 50 m1. of ether was slowly added. After stirring for 2 hours at 10C, 75 ml. of wet ether was added slowly followed by 40ml. of water and then 20g. of sodium tartarate. Themixture was allowed to stir overnight. The ether layer was separated after 300 ml. of water was added to complete the solution of the inorganic salts. The ether layer was washed, dried over anhydrous magnesium sulfate and the ether removed under reduced pressure. The product weighing 24.2g (97% recovery) was found to contain l2.5% active [0] [Calculated active [0], 12.8%] e pend 9 27-wee EXAMPLE 1v Preparation of fl,4-l3is( t butylperoxy 1 pentanol ter, and 25g. of sodium tartrate. The mixture was al-- lowed to stirovernight'.

The ether layer was separated, washed with water,

dried over anhydrous magnesium sulfate, and the etherremoved under reduced pressure (258C, 15 Torr). The residue, 30.2g., was-taken up in 200 ml. of pentane and redried. The pentane was removed under reduced pressure, leaving 29.7g. of product in more than 100% yield (n-butyl alcohol is present as is evidenced by its odor).

.Calculated: active [0], 11.25%. Found: active [0],

9.69% corresponding to an assayof 86%.

-EXAMPLE V Preparation of 6,6-Bis( t-butylperoxy )-1 -heptanol A solution of 1.0g. (0.026 mole) of lithium aluminum-hydride dissolved in 35 ml. of ether was stirred and maintained at 25C, while 4.2g. of n-butyl 6,6- bis(t-butylperoxy)-heptanoate (recovered from an incomplete reaction of the ester with an insufficient amount of LiAlI-h) dissolved in ml. of ether was added slowly. After stirring for 2 hours, 50ml. of wet ether was added to hydrolyze unreacted LiAlH, followed by the slow addition of 50 ml. of water to ensure complete hydrolysis. Approximately 15 g. of sodium tartrate was then added and the mixture stirred to dissolve the inorganic salts. The ether solution of the product was separated, washed, dried over anhydrous magnesium sulfate and the ether removed under reduced pressure, leaving 2.7g. of product (93% recovery). Calculated: Active [0], 10.95%. Found: Active [0], 9.35%: 86% assay. Some of the n-butyl alcohol formed during the reduction of the ester is left in the product and is easily detected by its odor.

A mixture of 69.6g. (0.6 mole) of acetonyl acetate and 118.2g. (1.2 mole) of 90% t-butyl hydroperoxide was stirred at 0C, while 59. lg. of 77% sulfuric acid was slowly added over a period of 50 minutes. The mixture was then stirred at 0C for 4.hou rs, the organic layer separated and washed cold with water, 50% sodium hydroxide solution and finally with water and then dried over anhydrous magnesium. sulfate. The separated product weighed 128.6g. (77% recovery). lodometric assay indicated the product contained 95.7% of the desired compound.

EXAMPLE vn Preparation of l ,3 -Diacetoxy-2,2-bis( t-butylperoxy )propane C(CHs):

A reaction mixture containing 17.4g. (0.1 mole) of 1,3-diacetoxyacetone, 21.7g. (0.22 mole) of 90% tbu'tyl hydroperoxide and ml. of benzene was stirred at 0C, while 108g. 77% sulfuric acid was added slowly. The reaction mixture was then stirred at 0C for 4 hours, and the organic layer separated. The organic layer was washed with water, 2% sodium hydroxide solution and finally with 'water, and then dried over anhydrous magnesium sulfate. The product weighed 7.8g. lodometric assay indicated the product contained 96.5% of the desired compound.

EXAMPLE VIII Preparation of I 4,4-Bis( 1,-1,3,3-tetramethylbutylperoxy)-pentyl Benzoate A mixture of 824g. (0.04 mole) of 4-oxopentyl benzoate, 18.80g. (0.104 mole) of 1', 1,3,3-tetramethy1butyl hydroperoxide and 25 m1. of ether was stirred at 10C while 9.0g. of 77% sulfuric acid solution was slowly added. The reaction mixture was then stirred at 0C for 4 hours, diluted with cold water and the organic layer separated, washed with 5% sodium hydroxide solution and then with water to neutrality. The ether solution was dried over anhydrous magnesium sulfate and the ether removed under reduced pressure. v

The product weighed 20.0g. assayed 101.3% of the calculated amount of active oxygen by iodometric assay.

9 EXAMPLE IX Preparation of 4,4-Bis(pinanylperoxy)pentyl Benzoate A mixture of 18.0g. (0.08 mole) of pinanyl hydroperoxide 8.24g. (0.04 mole) of 4-oxopentyl benzoate and g 50 ml. of ether was stirred at C while 9.0g. of 77% sulfuric acid solution was added slowly. After stirring for 4 hours at 0C, the organic layer was separated, washed with 5% sodium hydroxide solution and finally with water to neutrality. The solution was dried over anhydrous magnesium sulfate and the ether removed under reduced pressure.

The 18.34g. of product assayed for 98.4% of the calculated amount of active oxygen by iodometric assay for a yield of 85.8% of theory.

EXAMPLE X Preparation of 5 ,8-Dihydroperoxy-5 ,8-dimethyl-3 ,6,7 ,10-tetraoxa- 2,1 l-dodecadione A mixture of 10.9g. (0.16 mole) of 50% hydrogen peroxide, 0.98g. (0.01 mole) of 95% sulfuric acid and 30 ml. of ether was stirred at 5C while 18.58g. (0.16 mole) of acetoxyacetone was added over a period of minutes. The reaction mixture was stirred for an additional hour at 0C, the ether layer separated, washed with cold 40% ammonium sulfate solution and then treated with solid sodium bicarbonate to adjust the pH of the aqueous layer to pH 5. The ether layer was separated, dried over anhydrous magnesium sulfate and the ether removed under reduced pressure, leaving 15.57g. of product assaying 7.01% active oxygen by iodometric titration (43.5% of the calculated active oxygen for the desired product).

EXAMPLE XI SP1 EXOTHERM TESTS Curing of Basic Polyester Resin Samples of 1-acetoxy-2,2-bis(t-butylperoxy)- propane (from Example VI) assaying 99.2% (Compound A) and 1-caproxy-2,2-bis(t-butylperoxy)- propane (from Example I) assaying 98% (Compound B) were tested in the SP1 Exotherm test in basic polyester resin and compared at equal active oxygen levels with t-butyl peroxybenzoate (tBPD). The bath temperature was 1 15C, and the weight percentages used were 1% tBPD, 0.71% Compound A, and 0.85% Compound B.

tBPD Compound A Compound B Gel (min.) 5.5 5.9 7.0 Cure (min.) 6.7 7.2 8.3 5 Peak F 435 438 436 Barcol 4045 45-50 40-45 'Barcol Impressor reading (Model GYZj- 934-1) tBPD Compound D Compound E Gel (min.) 5.5 4.2 3.0 Cure (min.) 6.7 5.3 4.2 Peak "F I 435 440 438 Barcol 40-45 40-45 4045 'Barcol Impressor reading (Model GYZ]- 934-1) Polymerization tests were carried out, using the SP1 Procedure for Running Exotherm Curves Polyester Resins published in the Preprint of the 16th Annual Conference Reinforced Plastics Division, Society of Plastics Industry Inc., February 1961.

The testswere run in general purpose Basic unsatlurated polyester resin, having the following formula- 'tion:

Maleic anhydride 1.0 mole Phthalic anhydride 1.0 mole Propylene glycol 2.2 mole Acid Number of alkyl resin 35 45 Inhibitor (Hydroquinone) of final solution) 0.013 Styrene monomer of final solution) 32 34 EXAMPLE XII CURING OF A COBALTED POLYESTER RESIN A sample of 5.S-dihydroperoxy-S,8-dimethyl- 3,6,7, 10-tetraoxa-2,l l-dodecadione (from Example X) (CompoundC) assaying 43.4% was used in the SP1 exotherm test to cure a cobalt accelerated polyester resin formulation [basic polyester resin to which 0.2% of 6% cobalt ten-Cem (cobalt salt of a long chain organic acid) solution had been added], and compared in activity to- LUPERSOL DDM, a commercial ketone peroxide catalyst. The samples were compared at an equal active oxygen level (1% by weight of LUPER- SOL DDM, 1.55% Compound C). The room temperature (approximately 23C) data and the 30C gel times (minutes) were recorded. Mooney Chemicals Inc.,

Cleveland, Ohio) Compound C LUPERSOL DDM 30C gel 9.8 25.5 R.T. Gel 15.5 36.2 RtT. cure 20.4 43.5 Peak F 308 255 Barcol 40 40 MEK PEROXIDES in Dimethyl phthalate solution [11% Active Oxygen] temperatures. The extent of crosslinking was determined by immersing the cured samples in tetrahydrofuran at C for 16-18 hours and determing the amount of undissolved material. lnthe table the weight of peroxidic compound is given in phr (parts per 100 parts of resin).

*dibasic lead phosphite EXAMPLE Xlll A sample of 1-acetoxy-2,2-bis(t-butylperoxy)propane (from Example V1) assaying 99.2% was tested as 'synergist in a flame retardant formulation for styrene at a concentration of 0. I98% (equivalent to O.4% of dicumyl peroxide) and 0.4% tetrabromoethane.

The formulated styrene was self-extinguishing in 2.4 seconds, showing that the peroxidic product was a good flame retardant synergist.

Flame Retardant Test In this test ASTM D- 635-56T and more completely discussed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,388,864, a sample containing only the 0.4% tetrabromoethane (no peroxide) was v not self-extinguishing.

EXAMPLE XIV Crosslinking 'of Polyethylene The peroxide crosslinking of polyethylene (Union Carbide DYNH-1)* was carried out by mixing 0.01 equivalent of peroxide with 100g. of polyethylene, on a roll mill and curing the samples in a heated press for 30 minutes to .crosslink the polyethylene. The extent of crosslinking was determined by extracting the crosslinked sampleswith hot xylene, the undissolved. fraction being the crosslinked material.

*Density 0.919; melt index 2.0 Bakelite Polyethylene Injection Molding Material Cure Crossphr F link l-acetoxy-2,2-bis(t-butylperoxy) 1.4 320 67.4 propane (from Example VI) 340 67.5

|-caproxy-2 2-his[ t-hutylpcroxy) 1.7 320 73.5 propane (from Example I) 340 73.1 v

"parts peroxide per lO (l parts of resin 5 EXAMPLE xv Crosslinking of Polyvinyl Chloride The crosslinking of polyvinyl chloride was carried out by incorporating 0.015 moles of the peroxidic compound in 100 parts of Exon 905 polyvinyl chloride resin Thus, having described the invention, what is claimed is:

l. A peroxyketal having the formula RiY or HO O (I) 0 OW RzO-CRa A, l 1.

in which R and R are C -C3 alkylene, C -C -phenaIkyIene or C -C -cycloalkylene; or -R,-CR is a cyclohexylene ring; Yis H or Y is attached to a carbon atom of R which carbon atom also contains an attached hydrogen atom;

(Firestone general purpose resin) and 5 parts of Dy-" phos PG* lead stabilizer (National bead Co.) and then curing the formulations in a heated press at various is attached to a carbon atom of R which carbon atom also contains an attached hydrogen atom; R is C C -alkyl, C C, -cycloalkyl; C C, phenylalkyl; phenyl, naphthyl, chlorophenyl or nitrophenyl; R and R are H, C -C -alkyl or C -C -cycloalkyl;

and W is 2. A peroxyketal of claim 1 having the formula 3. 3,3-Dihydroperoxy-2-methylbutyl pivalate. 4. 1 ,3-Diacetoxy-2,2-bis( t-butylperoxy )pro'pane.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2455569 *Jul 20, 1948Dec 7, 1948Shell DevReaction products of tertiary organic hydroperoxides with aldehydes or ketones
US3296184 *Feb 11, 1964Jan 3, 1967Montedison SpaVulcanizable compositions of olefin polymers or copolymers and vulcanized articles obtained therefrom
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4267109 *Jul 31, 1978May 12, 1981Argus Chemical CorporationCyclic perketals and their use for cross-linking high density polyethylene
US4271279 *May 21, 1976Jun 2, 1981Argus Chemical CorporationCyclic perketals and their use for cross-linking high density polyethylene
US5312997 *May 4, 1993May 17, 1994Bayer AktiengesellschaftSurface-active pereoxides and their use
US5866712 *Oct 10, 1997Feb 2, 1999Elf Atochem North America, Inc.Polymerization and curing catalysts
US5981787 *Oct 10, 1997Nov 9, 1999Elf Atochem North America, Inc.Peroxyoxalates derived from hydroxy-hydroperoxides
Classifications
U.S. Classification560/107, 528/303, 560/123, 568/563, 560/1, 560/124, 560/121, 560/122, 560/264
International ClassificationC08F4/32, C08F283/01, C07C409/22, C08F4/36
Cooperative ClassificationC08F283/01, C07C409/22, C08F4/32
European ClassificationC08F4/32, C08F283/01, C07C409/22
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 17, 1990ASAssignment
Owner name: ATOCHEM NORTH AMERICA, INC., A PA CORP.
Free format text: MERGER AND CHANGE OF NAME EFFECTIVE ON DECEMBER 31, 1989, IN PENNSYLVANIA;ASSIGNORS:ATOCHEM INC., ADE CORP. (MERGED INTO);M&T CHEMICALS INC., A DE CORP. (MERGED INTO);PENNWALT CORPORATION, A PA CORP. (CHANGED TO);REEL/FRAME:005496/0003
Effective date: 19891231