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Publication numberUS3854164 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 17, 1974
Filing dateJan 15, 1973
Priority dateJan 15, 1973
Publication numberUS 3854164 A, US 3854164A, US-A-3854164, US3854164 A, US3854164A
InventorsSchmitz J
Original AssigneeWhirlpool Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Self-propelled upright vacuum cleaner
US 3854164 A
Abstract
A vacuum cleaner structure having self-propelling means. A handle is associated with the vacuum cleaner and the self-propelling means to drive the vacuum cleaner in accordance with force applied forwardly or rearwardly to the handle. The handle is biased to an Off position. The driving force developed by the propelling means varies as a function of the displacement of the handle from the Off position. The propelling means includes wheels carried on the oppositely projecting shaft ends of the drive motor for direct drive by the drive motor.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Schmitz Dec. 17, 1974 SELF-PROPELLED UPRIGHT VACUUM CLEANER Y [75] Inventor: Joseph F. Schmitz, St. Paul, Minn.

[73] Assignee: Whirlpool Corporation, Benton Harbor, Mich.

[22] Filed: Jan. 15, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 323,779

52 US. c1 15/340, 15/377, 15/413 1511' 1111. C1 A4719/00 158 Field 61 Search 15/319, 340, 413, 49 R, 15/49 c, 50 R, 50 c, 377; 180/60, 62, 65 R,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 6/1941 MacFarland 61 a1 15/413 x 10/1942 Smellie 15/413 x 4/1953 Turner et a1 15/413 X 3,618,687 11/1971 Ripple et al. 15/340 X Primary Examiner-Harvey C. Hornsby Assistant E.\'am1'ncrC. K. Moore Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Hofgren, Wegner, Allen, Stellman'& McCord 57 ABSTRACT A vacuum cleaner structure having self-propelling means. Ahandle is associated with the vacuum cleaner and the self-propelling means to drive the vacuum cleaner in accordance with force applied forwardly or rearwardly to the handle. The handle is biased to an Off position. The driving force developed by the propelling means varies as a function of the displacement of the handle from the Off position. The

propelling means includes wheels carried on the oppositely projecting shaft ends of the drive motor for direct drive by the drive motorf 16 Claims, 24 Drawing Figures PATENIEUBECI 11914 SHEEI MJF 5 PATENTEL E H914 5.854.164 SHEET 5 OF 5 0 NEUTRO! ma /Q55 1 SELF-PROPELLED UPRlGHT VACUUM CLEANER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates to vacuum cleaners and the like, and in particular to means for propelling vacuum cleaners and the like.

i 2. Description of the Prior Art United States Letters Patent which would appear to be pertinentto the present invention are as follows U.S. Pat. Nos: 1

716,065 Ledwinka Automobile 1,076,652 Hoffman Driving Mechanism for Vehicles 1,098,849 Smart et a1 Switch 1 1,242,115 Russell Switch for Dental Instruments 1,723,371 Pieper Combined Tool Handle and Switch 1,813,856 Klein DirectDrive for Antifriction Roller Bearing Free Wheels 1,953,340 Doemling Suction Cleaner 5 2,041,442 Stinsman Floor Polishing Machine 2,138,239 lrgens Self-Propelled Implement 2,348,053 Bowker Electrically Operated Motor Vehicles 2,706,008 Voigt Powered Golf Bag Carrier 2,823.41 1 Kirby Vacuum Cleaner 2,879.85 8 Thomas Battery Energized,

' Motor-Driven Vehicle 2,937,706 Chandler Self-l 'ropelled Carts 3.095.534 Cockrell Circuit for Controlling Energization of a Direct Current Load 3,195,029 Gilbreath Series Motor Control 3,222,582 Heyman et a1 Variable Speed Motor System Utilizing Controlled Rectifiers 3,225,853 Norton et al Control Handle for Golf Cart 3,354,496 .lonsson Suction Cleaner Nozzle of the Agitator Type 3,385,077 Marsteller Air Conditioner 3,457,676 Hutson v Photosensitive Power Control System- 3,489,874 Baumann Control Switch for an I Electric Dry Razor Ledwinka U.S. Pat. No. 716,065 shows an automobile construction utilizing an early propelling means.

Hoffman U.S. Pat. No, 1,076,652 shows 'another form of early drive mechanism for propelling a vehicle.

Smart et al. US. Pat. No. 1,098,849 shows a switch adapted to be operated by the longitudinal movement of an actuating member.

Russell U.S. Pat. No. 1,242,115 shows a longitudinal movable switch for use in a dental instrument. 'Pieper U.S. Pat No. 1,723,371 shows a similar switch.

Doemling U.S. Pat. No. 1,953,340 shows a vacuum cleaner wherein an agitator is driven from an actuating motor separate from the fan motor.

I Stinsman U.S. Pat. No. 2,041,442 shows a floor polishing machine having a fan for ventilating the motor elements.

lrgens U.S. Pat. No. 2,138,239 shows a self-propelled powered lawnmower having a handle grip for controllingforward and rearward movement of the lawnmower.

Bowker U.S. Pat, No. 2,348,053 shows a battery operated motor vehicle having a dynamotor within each wheel.

Voigt U.S. Pat. No. 2,706,008 shows a powered golf bag carrier having a worm gear arrangement providing increased power under heavy loading conditions and brakingmeans to secure the carrier in a stationary position.

Kirby U.S. Pat. No. 2,823,41 1 shows a vacuum cleaner with the fan motor also driving a brush in the nozzle.

Thomas U.S. Pat. No. 2,879,858 shows a battery driven vehicle wherein the current supplied to the drive motor is varied in accordance with the tension applied to the handle thereof.

Chandler U.S. Pat. No. 2,937,706 shows a selfpropelled cart having a handle controlling the electric drive motor thereof with the amount of pull on the handle varying the force developed by the motor.

Cockrell U.S. Pat, No. 3,095,534 shows a circuit for controlling energization of a direct current load utilizing a controlled rectifier in controlling the current to the motor armature. Gilbreath U.S. Pat. No. 3,195,029 shows a series motor control using a controlled rectifier in similarly controlling the current to the motor armature. Heyman et al. U.S. Pat. No. 3,222,582 shows a motor system utilizing controlled rectifiers.

Norton et al. U.S. Pat. No. 3,225,853 show a control handle for a golf cart providing adjustable power as a function of the magnitude of the applied force.

.lonsson U.S. Pat. No. 3,354,496 shows a vacuum cleaner nozzle having an agitator driven by an electric motor.

Marsteller U.S. Pat. No. 3,385,077 shows an air conditioner wherein modulation of the air flow is controlled by an optical system utilizing a photocell. Hutson U.S. Pat, No. 3,475,676 shows a photosensitive power control system utilizing similar optical means.

Baumann U.S. Pat. No. 3,489,874 shows a control switch for an electric razor having an operating knob which is selectively slidable, pivotable, or rockable in the casing.

Thus, the prior art shows the concept of propellin means such as automobiles, lawnmowers, golf bag carriers, and golf carts by self-contained motor driven power means. The art further shows the use of push- 3 to such a motor for varyingthe speed and torque thereof.

' SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention comprehends an improved vacuum cleaner construction having new and improved means for effecting controlled self-propelling thereof. Further, the present invention comprehends the use of the air moving means of the vacuum cleaner in conjunction with the propelling means for an improved efficiency thereof. The movement of the vacuum cleaner is effected by application of force to the handle thereof for controlling the drive motor through a new and improved control means.

More specifically, the control effects rectification of a li'ghtsource for providing a low cost. long life adjustable resistance means. The means for varying the trans mitted light may comprise a suitable mask positioned by the handle of the vacuum cleaner.

In another embodiment of control wherein the motor is operated only on similar polarity half cycles of the alternating current power supply, the variable-resistance is connected to the means for triggering the controlled rectifier through a parallel inverse diode circuit. Selection of the polarity of the motor operating current may be obtained by connecting a potentiometer resistor across, the parallel circuit with the slider of the potentiometer connected to the motor. Alternatively, se-

lection of the polarity may be effected by a selector the nozzle in different embodiments of the invention.

The cooling air may be drawn through the motor by the vacuum cleaner suction fan or may be delivered to 'the motor under pressure from the suction fan in different embodiments of the invention. The cooling air may comprise air from which dirt has been removed by the vacuum cleaner. Alternatively, the cooling air may comprise atmospheric air drawn by the suction fan concurrentlywith the drawing of the dirt laden air to the 'dirt separating means. The cooling air may be passed through the interior of the motor housing through suitable openings therein and may also be directed against the exterior of the housing by deflecting means such as the drive wheels as discussed above.

The drive wheels may comprise cup-shaped elements partially surrounding the motor housing while leaving a passage therebetween intermediate the ends. of the motor housing for passing cooling air therethrough.

The means for controlling the operation of the propelling motor may include an electronic switch phase controlled to'vary the current to the motor as a function of the position of the handle means. The control may function to provide power during each half cycle of the alternating current power supply. Alternatively, the control may function to provide current only during similar polarity half cycles of the alternating current power supply to slectively reversely operate the motor as a function of the selected polarity.

The phase controlled electronic switch may comprise a controlled rectifier. In one form, the rectifier comprises a bidirectional triode thyristor. In another embodiment, the rectifier comprises a silicon controlled rectifier. In one embodiment,-the means for controlling the control gate of the controlled rectifier comprises a bidirectional trigger diode. In another embodiment, the means for controlling the controlgate comprises a silicon unilateral switch.

Phase control of the controlled rectifier may be provided by varying a resistance in the control circuit thereof. In one embodiment, the variable resistance comprises a potentiometer. The potentiometer may have a gap in the mid-portion of the resistor thereof to provide an Off condition. In another embodiment, the variable resistor comprises a photocell and means forvarying the amount of light striking the photocell from switch having the moving contact selectively engageable with fixed contacts connected one each to the dif-,

dirt collecting chamber means, powered air moving means for moving air through said nozzle to said dirt collecting chamber means for removing the dirt therefrom, and an upstanding handle connected to the assembly for moving the assembly selectively forwardly and rearwardly over a surface to be vacuum cleaned of propelling means comprising drive wheel means mounted to the assembly for engaging the surface to be cleaned, motor means carried by the assembly forreversibly driving the wheel means, and control means for operating the motor means in a forward driving direction when the handle is'urged forwardly, and operating the motor means in a rearward driving direction when the handle is urgedrearwardly, the control means permitting operation of the motor means concurrently with the operation of the air moving means and prehandle is disposed in a preselected Off position.

Further more specifically, the vacuum cleaner structure of the present invention includes passage means for conducting cooling air into and fromthe housing,

and means for connecting the air moving means to the passage means for effecting forced ventilation cooling of the motor concurrently with the suction of dirt laden air through the nozzle. 1

Further more specifically, alternatively, the invention comprehends the provision in a vacuum cleaner structure including a carriage and suction nozzle carried by the carriage of propelling 'means comprising a pair of drive wheels, a drive motor having axial, oppositely outwardly extending shaft extensions, the wheels being fixed one each to the shaft extension to define with the motor a wheeled drive, and means for pivotally mounting the wheeled drive to the nozzle or fixedly to the carriage.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING Other features and advantages of the invention will I be apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing wherein:

. FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a vacuum cleaner embodying the invention;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary rear elevation thereof with the rear cover of the bag enclosure partially removed to illustrate details of the drive control;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary bottom plan view thereof;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary enlarged vertical section illustrating the handle switch control means;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary vertical section illustrating the propelling means mounted to the carriage of the vacuum cleaner.

FIG. 6 is a diametric section taken substantially along the line 6-6 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 1 is a schematic wiring diagram of the electric drive control;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary plan view with portions broken away illustrating one embodiment of the invention wherein cooling air is delivered from the suction fan to the drive motor;

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary side elevation thereof;

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary'side elevation thereof with the nozzle in a raised position;

FIG. 11 is a plan view illustrating another embodiment of the invention wherein cooling air is sucked through the drive motor to pass with dirt laden air to the dirt separating means; FIG. 12 is a fragmentary side elevation thereof; FIG. 13 is a fragmentary side elevation thereof with the nozzle in a raised position;

FIG. '14 is a plan view' illustrating another embodiment of the invention wherein cooling air is drawn through the drive motor to the suction inlet of the fan;

FIG. 15 is a fragmentary side elevation thereof;.'

FIG. 16 is a fragmentary side elevation thereof with the nozzle in a raised position;

FIG. 17 is a fragmentary side elevation of the vacuum cleaner construction of FIG. 5; I

FIG. 18 is a fragmentary side elevation thereof with the nozzle in a raised position; 1

FIG. 19 is a schematic wiring diagram of a modified form of electrical control of the drive means;

FIG. 20 is a schematic wiring diagram illustrating a still further modified control;

FIG. 21 is an elevation of a mask for use in the control of FIGS. 20 and 24;

FIG. 22 is a schematic wiring diagram of yet another modified form of control;

FIG. 23 is a fragmentary schematic wiring diagram illustrating a modification of the control of FIG. 22; and

FIG. 24 is a schematic wiring diagram of yet another drive control embodying the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS In the exemplary embodiments of the invention as disclosed in the drawing, a vacuum cleaner generally designated 10 is shown to comprise an upright vacuum cleaner having a nozzle 11 and an upstanding bag en-- closure 12. The nozzle is mounted to a carriage 13 herein provided with rear wheels 14. A brush and. beater bar 15 is mounted at the front of the nozzle to be driven from the suction fan motor 16 by suitable 23 of the drive motor may be secured to the carriage 13 by a suitable bracket 24 and screws 25.

Wheels 19 and 20 define cup-shaped elements facing toward each other coaxially of the motor as illustrated in FIG. 6. Thus, wheel 19 defines an end wall 26 and a cylindrical side wall 27, and wheel 20 defines an end wall 28 and a cylindrical side wall 29. The distal end'30 of wheel side wall 27 is spaced longitudinally from the distal end 31 of side wall 29 to define a space 32 therebetween for passing cooling air.

As illustrated in FIGS. 5, 6, 8, l7 and 18, cooling air may be delivered from the suction fan 45 through a duct 33 to the interior of motor housing 23 through an inlet opening 34 in the'housing. After passing through the housing, the cooling air may exhaust through the opposite ends 35 and 36 of the housing. As shown in FIGS. 6 and 8, the cupshaped wheels are spaced axially and circumferentially from the housing to define flow paths 37 whereby the air deflected by the wheels is delivered to the space 32 to exhaust to the atmosphere. As shown in FIG. 8, the dirt laden air is conducted to bag 39 by means of a duct 40 extending from the nozzle 11 into the enclosure 12 wherein the bag is received.

A duct 41 connects the enclosure 12 to the suction inlet 42 of the fan 45. The shroud 43 extending about the fan motor 16 is provided with a discharge opening 44 for discharging air from the fan 45 to atmosphere. As shown in FIG. 8, the duct 33 opens through the shroud 43 for receiving a portion of the air delivered from fan 45 for delivery to the drive motor.

As shown in FIG. 17 and 18, the nozzle 11 may be pivoted on the carriage 13 by means of a projection 46 on housing 12 engaging a lever 47 pivotally mounted on a bracket 48 carried by the carriage 13. Thus, the wheel drive 17 is.maintained in engagement with the subjacent floor F while the nozzle may be pivoted to space the brush and beater bar above the floor level by suitable pivoting of the enclosure 12 on the carriage. Duct 33 maintains the connection between the suction fan and motor 18 in the difierent relationships of the nozzle and carriage-as illustrated in FIGS. 17 and 18.

Vacuum cleaner 10 is propelled on the subjacent floor by suitable energization of drive motor l8 as a result of pressure applied to a handle 49 upstanding from the bag housing 12, as illustrated in FIG. 1. As shown in FIG. 2, bag enclosure 12 includes a rear portion 50. Removal of rear closure 52 of housing 12 provides access to the space 52a within the rear portion 50. Handle 49 extends through the top wall 53 of the housing portion 50 and is provided with a slide tube 54 internally carrying a housing 55 defining a cam 56 selectively engageable with the actuator 57 of a first switch 58 and the actuator 59 of a second switch 60. The switches are carried on the rear housing portion 50. A centering device generally designated 61 is mounted in housing 55 for centering the cam 56 between the actuators 57 and 59, as shown in FIG. 4. v

More specifically, the centering device includes a rod 62 fixedly secured to the housing portion 50 by a pin 63. Rod 62 is provided with a pin 64 intermediate the ends 65 and 66 of housing 55. A first coil spring 67 extends coaxially about rod 62 to a washer 68 slidably mounted on the rod adjacent pin 64. A second coil spring 69 extends from housing end 65 to a washer 70 slidably mounted on rod 62 oppositely adjacent pin 64. Slide tube 54 further is provided with a mechanical actuator 71, as shown in FIGS. 2 and 7, for controlling the Reversely, similarly, where the handle is moved rearwardly so as to move cam 56 upwardly to close switch 58, positive power supply terminal 77a is connected through moving contact 58a of switch 58 to motor armature 76 and through switch 60 and silicon controlled rectifier 82 to the negative power terminal 77b causing a reverse operation of the motor 18 under the speed control of potentiometer 72.

Electrical components of one control found to provide excellent functioning as described above, are as follows:

diagram of FIG. 7. As shown, drive motor 18 illustratively comprises a permanent magnet direct current motor having an armature 76 connected between the moving contacts 60a of switch 60 and contacts 58a of switch 58. Direct current power is delivered to the motor 18 from alternating current power supply leads L1 and L2 connected to a full wave bridge rectifier 77 through a single pole, single throw interlock switch 78. The positive output terminal 77a of the full wave bridge rectifier is connected to fixed contacts 60b and 58b of switches 60 and 58, respectively. A resistor 79 and a resistor 80 are connected in series between terminal 77a and the negative terminal 77b of rectifier 77. Diode ,81 is connected between terminal 77a and second fixed contact 600 of switch 60 and second fixed contact 580 of switch 58 and through a silicon controlled rectifier 82 to negative terminal 77b. Diode 81' is further connected through a second inversely related diode 83 to the potentiometer 72, having its slider 72a connected to a fixed resistor 84 and a drive motor speed selectorswitch 85. Switch 85, in turn, is connected through a fixed resistor 86 and a capacitor 87 to power terminal 77b. A silicon unilateral switch 88 has its gate 88a connected to terminal 89 between resistors 79 and 80. Switch 88 is connected from a terminal 90 between resistor 86 and capacitor 87 to the gate 82a of the silicon controlled rectifier 82. A resistor 91 is connected from rectifier gate 82a to power terminal 77b and a series of connection of a resistor 92 and capacitor 93 is connected across the rectifier 820. A jumper 72b is connected to the opposite endsof the resistor 72c of potentiometer 72. 4

' As discussed above, longitudinal movement of handle 49 by the application of force thereto by the users hand, as shown in FIG. 1, causes a corresponding movement of cam 56, as shown in FIG. 4, to actuate either forward switch 60 or reverse switch 58 as a function of the direction of force application of the handle. Further, the amount of longitudinal handle movement effected controls the positioning of the slider 72a of potentiometer 72 to control the silicon unilateral switch 88 and thereby control the amount of current passed by the controlledrectifier 82 thereby to control the speed and torque of the motor 18. As shown in FIG. 7, when forward switch 60 is closed, i.e., by a downward movement of cam 56 (FIG. 4), moving contact 60a closes with fixed contact 60b to provide power from positive power supply terminal 77a through motor armature 76, switch 58 and through the silicon controlled rectifier to negative terminal 77b. Phase control of silicon controlled rectifier 82 is effected by the setting of slider 720 relative to resistor 720 of potentiometer 72 so as to vary the amount of current passed by rectifier 82 depending on the amount of displacement of slider 72a from the center position 72d of resistor 72c.

Motor American Lincoln Permanent Magnet DC 0 to l Megohm 220 Kilohms 2.2 Kilohms GE C22B Potentiometer Resistor Resistor Diode Silicon Controlled Rectifier Diode Resistor Resistor Capacitor Silicon Unilateral Switch Resistor Resistor Capacitor INI694 330 Kilohms l Kilohm 0.8 mfd.

I00 Ohms 33 Ohms 0.0l mfd.

power supply leads L1 and L2. A selector switch 194 is connected to the output terminals 177a and 177b of the power supply for selectively connecting power supply terminal 177a to a motor terminal 195 or a terminal 196 and power supply terminal 177b concurrently to terminal 196 or terminal 195 as a function of the position of the vacuum cleaner handle. The means for controlling current through the motor 18 comprises a controlled rectifier illustratively comprising a bidirectional triode thyristor, or triac, 197 having its gate 1970 controlled by a bidirectional trigger diode, or diac, 198 connected in series with a fixed resistor 199 and a potentiometer 172 to a terminal 200 connected between motor 18 and triac 197. Triac 197 is connected between motor 18 and terminal 196 and a capacitor 201 is connected from a terminal 202 between diac 198 and resistor 199 and terminal 196. The slider 172a of potentiometer 172 is connected to terminal 200 and the resistor 1720 has its opposite ends connected by a jumper 172b.

' Thus, current flow to motor 18 is controlled by the triac 197 under the phase control of diac 198 which, in turn, is controlled by the setting of potentiometer slider 172a and switch 194 by the vacuum cleaner handle to provide selectively reversible operation of the vacuum cleaner wheeled drive motor at different speeds and torques as desired.

As shown in FIG. 20, the portion of the control 173 connected to terminals 195 and 196 may be modified to utilize a photocell 203 in lieu of potentiometer 172 as a variable resistance for controlling the dia'c 198. A neon lamp 204 may be connected between terminals 195 and 196 for directing light to the photocell 203. A mask 205 carried for movement with the vacuum cleaner handle 49 is interposed between lamp 204 and photocell 203 to control the resistance of the photocell.

As shown in FIG. 21, the mask 205 includes an opaque portion 205a defined by downwardly opening cusps 205b and upwardly opening cusps 2050 for varying the amount of light received by the photocell as a function of the movement of the mask from a centered position under the control of the vacuum cleaner handle. The control of FIG. 20 thus provides an improved. long life control as frictional wear of control elements is avoided.

Referring to FIGS. 22-24, further modified control means for controlling a wheeled drive motor 18 of the vacuum cleaner are shown to provide such control under half wave voltage conditions. More specifically, as shown in FIG. 22, motor 18 may be connected through a triac 1973 across the alternating current power supply leads L1 and L2. The triac is phase controlled by a diac 198 connected to its gate 197a. A capacitor 2013 is'connected from power supply lead L2 to terminal 202. A fixed resistor 1993 is connected from terminal 200 to the slider 172a of potentiometer 1723 having its resistor 1726 connected between parallel inverse diodes 206 and 207 which, in turn, are connected to terminal 202. Resistor l72c preferably has a relatively high value, such as 4 or 5 megohms, and thus prevents triggering of the triac 1973 when in the center position, as shown in FIG. 22. However, when the vacuum cleaner handle is moved in either direction to correspondingly move the slider 172a, the triac is triggered during similar half cycles of the alternating current power supply. Thus, illustratively, when the slider 172a is moved upwardly as seen in FIG. 22, the triac is triggered on positive half cycles and when the slider is moved downwardly, the triac is triggered on negative half cycles. Further, as the total resistance of the circuit through the diode varies as the amount of movement of the slider 172a, motor 183 is'controlled not only as to direction of movement, but also as to speed and torque by the phase control'of triac 1973 by diac 1983.

As shown in FIG. 23, the potentiometer may be provided with a modified resistor 172d having a gap 172e at the center portion so that when the slider 172a is in the center position, the control'will be in an Off condition as no current can flow to the diac 1983 from terminal 200.

Referring now to FIG. 24, a further modified control is shown to comprise a control similar to that illustrated in FIG. 22 but within the variable resistance is provided by photocell 2035 in lieu of the potentiometerv 172 and the switching function is provided by a selector switch 208 having its moving contact 208a connected in series with the photocell 2035, one fixed contact 208!) connected to diode 2075, and a second fixed contact 208c connected to diode 2065. The resistance of photocell 2035 is controlled by lamp 2045 and mask 2055 as described above relative to the control of FIG. 20. Switch 208 is operated by handle 49 Concurrently with the moving of mask 2055 to provide the desired reverse operation of vacuum cleaner drive motor 185 concurrently with the speed and torque control thereof by the control of the variable resistance of photocell 2035.

The control of F [G 24 is similar'to the control of FIG.

22 in that the operation of the motor .185 is by similar polarity half cycles of the altemating'current power supply by means of the inverse parallel diodes 2065 and I72 Potentiomctcr 0 to I Megohm I77 Full Wave 200 Volt PRV.

Rectifier 4 Amperes I81 Motor American Lincoln Permanent Magnet DC I94 Selector Switch 'DPDT I97 Triac GE SC-IOB I98 Diac GE ST-Z I99 Resistor Kilohms 2OI Capacitor O.I mfd.

I82 Motor American Lincoln Permanent Magnet DC I972 Triac GE SC4OB I982 Diac GE STZ I992 Resistor 30 Kilohms 2012 Capacitor 0.I mfd.

203 Photocell Vactec VT-IOIH 204 Lamp Signalite Neon I723 Potentiometer 0 to l Megohm I83 Motor American Linrzzoln Permanent Magnet DC I973 Triac GE SC4OB I983 Diac GE ST-2 I993 Resistor 30 Kilohms 20l3 Capacitor O.l mfd.

206 Diode INI694 207 Diode IN I694 I724 Potentiometer 0 to I Megohm 2064 Diode IN I694 2074 Diode INI694 I85 Motor American Lincoln Permanent Magnet DC I975 Triac GE $0108 2035 Photocell Vactec VT-IOIH 2065 Diode IN I694 2075 Diode lNl694 2045 Lamp Signalite Neon The modified controls of FIGS. 19-24 function in the vacuum cleaner structure similarly to the control 73 exconstruction may include modified means for effecting cept as otherwise noted above.

Referring now to FIGS. 11-16, the vacuum cleaner the delivery of cooling air to the drive motor 18 by means of the suction fan 45.- Thus, as shown in FIGS. 11-13, a duct 209 may be connected between the motor housing opening 34 and the suction duct leading from the nozzle 11 to the dirt collecting chamber 38.Thus the suction pressure efiected by fan serving to draw dirt laden air into the vacuum cleaner motor housing opening 340 directly'to the suction inlet 420 of the fan 450 defined by the shroud 430. Thus, the I cooling air sucked through the drive motor is delivered directly to fan 450 rather than through the dirt separating chamber as in the embodiment of FIGS. ll-l3. In all other respects, the vacuum cleaner constructions of FIGS. ll-l6 are similar to the vacuum cleaner construction illustrated in FIG. 8-10 and similar elements thereof are identified by, related referencenumerals. I

Thus, the vacuum cleaner constructions of the present invention provide animproved facilitated propelling of the vacuum cleaner over the surface to be cleaned. The drive motor of the propelling means and the suction fan of the vacuum cleaner are cooperatively associated for improved efficiency and low cost of the unit. Improved trouble-free, long life control means are provided for effecting desired reversible driving of the propelling means. The-vacuum cleaner constructions of thepresent invention are extremely simple and economical of manufacture while yet providing the highly desirable features discussed above.

The foregoing disclosure of specific embodiments is illustrative of the broad inventive concepts comprehended by the invention.

I claim: v

1. In a vacuum cleaner having means forming a dirt collecting chamber, a selectively positionable handle attached to said means forming a dirt collecting chamber for controlling movement of the vacuum cleaner selectively forwardly and rearwardly over a surface to be vacuum cleaned, an air-conducting nozzle in communication with said dirt collecting chamber, and air moving means including first .motor means for moving air through said nozzle to become dirt laden and mov' ing said dirt laden air to said dirt collecting chamber means for removing the dirt therefrom, propelling means comprising: drive wheel means mounted on said vacuum cleaner nozzle for engaging the surface to be cleaned; second motor means carried by said vacuum cleaner nozzle and drivingly connected to said drive wheel means; and means for selectively controlling said second motor means for reversibly driving said drive wheel means forwardly and rearwardly in response to selective positioning of said handle, said air moving means including means for conducting cooling air other than the dirtladen air in heat transfer association with said second motor means for cooling said second motor means.

2. In a vacuum cleaner having means forming a dirt collecting chamber, a selectively positionable handle attached to said means forming a dirt collecting chamber for controlling movement of the vacuum cleaner selectively forwardly and rearwardly over a surface to be vacuum cleaned, an air conducting nozzle in communication with said dirt collecting chamber, and air moving means including first motor means for moving airthrough said nozzle to said dirt collecting chamber means for removing the dirt therefrom, propelling means comprising: drive wheel means mounted on said vacuum cleaner nozzle for engaging the surface to be cleaned; second motor means carried by said vacuum cleaner nozzle and drivingly connecting to said drive wheel means; and means for selectively controlling said second motor means for reversibly driving said drive wheel means forwardly and rearwardly in response to second motor means for reversibly driving said drive wheel means forwardly and rearwardly in response to selective positioning of said handle, said air moving means including means for conducting cooling air other than the dirt laden air in heat transfer association with said second motor means for cooling said second motor means and conducting said cooling air from said second motor means to said means forming a dirt collecting chamber.

4. In a vacuum cleaner having means forming a dirt collecting chamber, a selectively positionable handle attached to said means forming a dirt collecting chamber for controlling movement of the vacuum cleanerselectively forwardly and rearwardly over a surface to be vacuum cleaned, an air conducting nozzle in communication with said dirt collecting chamber, and air moving means including first motor means for moving air through said nozzle to become dirt laden and moving said dirt laden air to said dirt collecting chamber 'means for removing the dirt therefrom, propelling means comprising: drive wheel means mounted on said vacuum cleaner nozzle for engaging the surface to be cleaned; second motor means carried by said vacuum cleaner nozzle and drivingly connected to said drive wheel means; and means for selectively controlling said second motor means for reversibly driving said drive wheel means forwardly and rearwardly in response to selective positioning of said'handle, said air moving means including duct means for conducting air from said nozzle to said means forming a dirt collecting chamber and means for conducting cooling air other than the dirt laden air in heat transfer association with said second motor means for cooling said second motor means and conducting the cooling air from said second motor means to said duct means.

5. In a vacuum cleaner havingmeans forming a dirt collecting chamber, a selectively positionable handle selective positioning of said handle, said air moving I means including means for conducting clean air discharged from said dirt collecting chamber means in heat transfer association with said second motor means for cooling said second motor means.

3. In a vacuum cleaner having means forming a dirt collecting chamber, a selectively positionable handle attached to said means forming a dirt collecting chamber for controlling movement of the vacuum cleaner selectively forwardly and rearwardly over a surface to be vacuum cleaned, an air conducting nozzle in communication with said dirt collecting chamber, and air moving means including first motor means for moving air through said nozzle to become dirt laden and moving said dirt laden air to said dirt collecting chamber means for removing the dirt therefrom, propelling means comprising: drive wheel means mounted on said vacuum cleaner nozzle for engaging the surface to be cleaned; second motor means carried by said vacuum cleaner nozzle and drivinglyconnected to said drive wheel means; and means for selectively controlling said attached to said means forming a dirt collecting chamber for controlling movement of the vacuum cleaner chamber forwardly andrearwardly over a surface to be vacuum cleaned, an air conducting nozzle in communication with said dirt collecting chamber, and air moving means including first motor means for moving air through said nozzle to become dirt laden and moving said dirt laden air to said dirt collecting chambr means for removing the dirt therefrom, propelling means comprising: drive wheel meansmounted'on said vacuum cleaner nozzle for engaging the surface to be cleaned; second motor means carried by said vacuum cleaner nozzle and drivingly connected to said drive wheel means; and means for selectively controlling said second motor means for reversibly driving said drive wheel means forwardly and rearwardly in response to selective positioning of said handle, said drive wheel means being mounted on oppositely projecting shaft ends of said second motor means to provide a direct drive relationship between said drive wheel means and said second motor means, said air moving means including means for conducting cooling air other than the dirt laden air in heat transfer association-with said second motor means for cooling said second motor means, and said drive wheel means define cup-shaped wheels having tubular side walls extending coaxially about said second motor means and having confrontingdistal ends spaced apart to define a flow passage for said cooling air. I

6. In a vacuum cleaner structure including a suction nozzle, and air treating means including passage means extending from said nozzle, and air moving means vfor sucking dirt laden air through said nozzle and passage means, a first motor for operating said air moving means, dirt collecting means for removing dirt from the sucked air, and discharge means for discharging cleaned air to atmosphere, means for propelling said vacuum cleaner structure comprising: a wheeled drive mounted to .said structure and including -a second motor having a housing; conducting means for conducting cooling air other than said dirt laden air into and from said housing; and means for causing said air moving means to effect movement of said cooling air to-provide forced internal ventilation cooling of said second motor concurrently with the suction of such dirt laden air through the nozzle.

7. The vacuum cleaner structure of claim 6 wherein said conducting means comprises second passage means and said last named means comprises means connecting said air moving means to said second passage means for directing a portion of the cleaned air to said second passage means for flow thereof through said housing and outwardly therefrom to atmosphere.

means and said last' named means comprises means connecting said air moving means to said second passage meansfo'r directing air under suction pressure from said second passage means directly to said air moving means of said air treating means.

10. The vacuum cleaner structure of claim 6 wherein said conducting means comprises second passage means and said last named means comprises means connecting said air moving means to said second passage means for directing air under suction pressure from said second passage means to said air treating means for delivery with the sucked dirt laden air to the means for removing dirt from the air.

11. The vacuum cleaner means of claim 6 wherein said air conducting means includes outlet means axially of said second motor for discharging the motor cooling air outwardly from the housing therethrough.

12. The vacuum cleaner means of claim 6 wherein said air conducting means includes outlet means axially of said second motor for discharging the motor cooling air outwardly from the housing therethrough. and means are provided adjacent said outlet means for deflecting the discharged cooling air along the exterior of the housing for further heat transfer association with said second motor.

13. The vacuum cleaner means of claim 6 wherein said conducting means includes outlet means axially of said second motor for discharging the motor cooling air outwardly from the housing therethrough, said wheeled drive including wheels adjacent said outlet means and arranged to deflect the discharged cooling air along the exterior of the housing for further heat transfer association with said second motor.

14. The vacuum cleaner means of claim 6 wherein said wheeled drive is mounted to a carriage.

15. The vacuum cleaner means 'of claim 6 wherein said motor housing is fixedly mounted to a carriage.

16. The vacuum cleaner means of claim 6 wherein said air treating means includes a first duct connecting the passage means to the means for removing dirt from the air, and said connecting means comprises a second duct connecting said conducting means to said first duct. g 1

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE F CORRECTION Patent No. 3!854rl64 Dated December 17, 1974 Inventor(s) JOSEPH F. SCHMITZ It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Colunm l2, Claim 5, line 41, cancel the first word "chamber" and insert in lieu thereof --selectively-;

and in line 46, after "collecting", correct the word "chambr" to --chamber--.

Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks

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Classifications
U.S. Classification15/340.2, 15/340.3, 180/19.3, 15/413, 15/377
International ClassificationA47L9/32, A47L5/30, A47L5/22
Cooperative ClassificationA47L9/325, A47L5/30
European ClassificationA47L5/30, A47L9/32C
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 19, 1994ASAssignment
Owner name: MATSUSHITA APPLIANCE CORPORATION, KENTUCKY
Free format text: CONFIRMATORY CONVEYANCE AND NAME CHANGE.;ASSIGNOR:MATSUSHITA FLOOR CARE COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:007247/0404
Effective date: 19941205
Dec 12, 1990ASAssignment
Owner name: MATSUSHITA FLOOR CARE COMPANY, LEBANON ROAD, DANVI
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:WHIRLPOOL FLOOR CARE CORP., ADMINISTRATIVE CENTER, 2000 M-63 NORTH, BENTON HARBOR, MICHIGAN 49022 A CORP. OF DELAWARE;REEL/FRAME:005539/0445
Owner name: WHIRLPOOL FLOOR CARE CORP., ("WHIRLPOOL SUB") A CO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:WHIRLPOOL CORPORATION, A CORP. OF DELAWARE;REEL/FRAME:005539/0501
Effective date: 19900731