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Publication numberUS3854789 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 17, 1974
Filing dateOct 2, 1972
Priority dateOct 2, 1972
Publication numberUS 3854789 A, US 3854789A, US-A-3854789, US3854789 A, US3854789A
InventorsKaplan E
Original AssigneeKaplan E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Connector for coaxial cable
US 3854789 A
Abstract
A coaxial connector which includes a body, a nut threadably engaging the body and means operably upon engagement and tightening of the nut on the body which firmly engages the cable and makes a positive electrical contact. Moisture sealing means are included between the body and nut and between the nut and the cable to form a moisture-proof structure.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[ Dec. 17, 1974 CONNECTOR FOR COAXIAL CABLE [76] Inventor: Eric S. Kaplan, 20 Beach Tree Rd.,

West Caldwell, NJ. 07006 [22] Filed: Oct. 2, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 294,237

[52] US. Cl 339/177R [51] Int. Cl H0lr 17/04 [58] Field of Search 339/177 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,292,136 12/1966 Somerset 339/177 E 3,501,737 3/1970 Harriset a1. 339/103 R 3,526,871 9/1970 Hobart ..'339/l77 E 3,587,033 6/1971 Brorein 339/177 R X 3,668,612 6/1972 Nepovim 339/177 R X 3,671.926 6/1972 Nepovim 339/177 E FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1,242,731 6/1967 Germany 339/177 R 828,886 12/1969 Canada 339/177 E Primary Examiner-Paul R. Gilliam Assistant ExaminerLawrence .1. Staab Attorney, Agent, or FirmThomas B. Graham [57] ABSTRACT A coaxial connector which includes a body, a nut threadably engaging the body and means operably upon engagement and tightening of the nut on the body which firmly engages the cable and makes a positive electrical contact. Moisture sealing means are included between the body and nut and between the nut.

and the cable to form a moisture-proof structure.

2 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures 1 CONNECTOR FOR COAXIAL CABLE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to coaxial connectors and more specifically to novel and improved weatherproof connectors for quickly and easily interconnecting coaxial cables and for feeding such cables through walls of metal and other materials without materially affecting the transmission characteristics of the cable.

Numerous coaxial connectors have been proposed but known connectors have embodied relatively complicated and expensive structures and many do not afford protection against moisture and at the same time enable cables to be quickly and easily attached to the connector. This invention overcomes the foregoing disadvantages of known coaxial connectors and provides a novel and improved connector characterized by its simplicity, adaptability to a wide variety of applications, ease of operation, and relatively low cost.

Another object of the invention resides in the provision of a novel and improved simplified coaxial connector wherein transmission losses are greatly minimized and a waterproof coupling between the cable and connector is provided.

Still, another object of the invention resides in the provision of a novel and improved coaxial connector which can be readily mounted in a wall of metal or other material such as a chassis or housing for electronic circuits and at the same time minimize line loss between the cable and the connector.

The coaxial connector in accordance with the invention utilizes a connector body having split female connector means surrounded by a split collet of insulating material and a cooperating nut arranged with an improved split collet and means coacting with the collets of the nut and body so that upon insertion of a coaxial cable and tightening the nut, the split collet in the nut will be compressed to grip the shield of the coaxial cable and at the same time the collet in the body will function to contract the female connector to firmly grip and extending portion of the conductor in the cable. Suitable waterproofing means between the body and the nut and between the nut and coaxial cable shield are compressed to form watertight seals.

The above and other objects and advantages of the invention will become more apparent from the follow ing description and accompanying drawings forming part of this application.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a longitudinal elevational view in partial section of a coaxial connector in accordance with the invention including a body portion and a nut with the coaxial cable positioned therein just prior to attachment of the nut to the body.

FIG. 2 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view of the connector body and nut of FIG. 1 after attachment of the nut to the body.

FIG. 3 is a longitudinal elevational view in partial section of a modified form of coaxial connector in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 4 is an elevational view in partial section of the split collet utilized in the form of the invention shown in FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a longitudinal elevational view in partial section of a coaxial double or splicing coupler in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 6 is a view of the double coupler of FIG. 5 with a nut and coaxial cable attached thereto.

FIG. 7 is an exploded longitudinal elevational view in partial section of coaxial connector elements in accordance with the invention for coupling coaxial cables of different diameters.

FIG. 8 is a longitudinal elevational view in partial section showing the elements of FIG. 7 assembled within a body.

Referring now to the drawings and more specifically to FIGS. 1 and 2 which illustrate on embodiment of a coaxial connector in accordance with the invention and which is particularly useful for attachment to the metal wall of a chassis or other housing. The specific structure and arrangement of elements of the connector maintains losses at a very low level and thus provides for highly efficient transfer of energy from a coaxial cable to asssociated electronic components. The con nector of FIGS. 1 and 2 is generally denoted by the numeral 10 and includes a hollow body portion 11 and a nut 12. The outer surface of the body includes a hexagonal portion 13 centrally thereof, a short threaded end portion 14 including an 0 ring 15 for attaching the body to the wall of a chassis or other housing, and a threaded end portion 16 for attachment of the nut 12.

The body 11 further includes cylindrical insulating means 17 within the left hand porition thereof as viewed in the figures and abutts an annular flange 18 forming part of the body. The righhand portion 19 of the insulating means 17 is of reduced diameter and has a tapered end portion 19. An opening 20 extends therethrough with the left-hand portion thereof being of reduced diameter as denoted by the numeral 21. The end portion 19 of the insulating means 17 also includes a plurality of slots 22 as will be observed in FIG. 1. A conductive female receptacle 23 is disposed within the opening portion 20 of the insulating means 17 and it includes an opening 24 having a serrated inner surface and a plurality of longitudinal slots. The left portion of the receptacle includes an elongated pin 25 formed integrally therewith and extending from the left end of the body 11.

The right-hand portion of the body 1 1 includes an annular groove 26 in the wall thereof for retaining a collet 27 of insulating material having an annular bead 28 on the outer surface thereof. The inner end of the opening 29 of the collet is tapered at 30 to receive the tapered end portion 19 of the insulating means 19. The outer end of the opening 29 may also be tapered to facilitate insertion of the central conductor 31 of the coaxial cable generally denoted by the numeral 32. Both the collet 27 as well as the insulating means 19 are preferably formed of a material having high insulating properties such as polystyrene and the like. Inasmuch as polystyrene and other similar plastics can be slightly deformed under pressure, the collet 27 can be forced in the body until the annular bead 28 engages the groove 26 whereupon it will return to its original form and the collet will be retained within the body 11. Moreover, since the bead 28 is narrower than the width of the groove 26, the collet can be displaced inwardly upon attachment of the cable 32 to effect contraction of-the tapered end 19' of the insulating means and inturn the slotted end of the receptacle 23 to firmly grip the cable conductor 31.

The nut 12 is in the form of a cap nut having an opening 33 in the outer or right-hand end thereof to receive the cable 32. Within the nut is an ring 34, a collar 35, a split collet 36, a threaded collar 37 and a spring retaining ring 38. The 0 ring 34 abutts the annular inwardly extending flange 39 on the end of the nut and the collar 35 has an outwardly extending flange 40 slidably engaging the opening portion 41 of the nut while the remainder of the collar engages the opening portion 42 of the nut. Since the longitudinal width of the opening portion 42 is less than the length of the collar to the right of the flange 40, pressure will be applied to the 0" ring 34 when the nut is engaged with the body as will be described.

The split collet 36 has tapers 43 and 44 on the ends thereof with the taper 43 cooperating with the taper 45 on the collar 35. The second threaded collar 37 is disposed to the left of the collet 36'and is retained within an annular groove 46 in the nut 12 by the split spring ring 38. The groove 46 has sufficient width to permit longitudinal displacement of the collar 37. The threads on collar 37 are arranged to mesh with the threads 47 in the nut to facilitate assembly and the spring ring 38 maintains the element in position. An 0 ring 48 is carried within a groove at the inner end of the threads 47 of the body 1 1 and provides a moisture seal between the body and the nut.

It is evident from the foregoing description that the structure by reason of the positive electrical connections made with both the shield and the central conductor of the coaxial cable, the sealing of the cable to the nut and the nut to the body and the use of insulating means within the housing having good insulating properties that a highly efficient low loss connector is provided.

The form of the invention shown in FIG. 3 is a simplified version of the connector shown in FIGS. 1 .and 2.

In this embodiment the body generally denoted by the numeral 50 has an opening 51 extending therethrough with the right hand portion 51 thereof being enlarged to slidably receive the split collet 52. The left hand end of the body 50 as shown in FIG. 3 includes a threaded portion 53 and an 0 ring 54 for fastening the body to the wall of a chassis or housing. The end 55 of the body includes an inwardly formed flange corresponding to the flange 18 as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 to provide an abutment to determine the innermost position of the coaxial cable 32. In this position the central conductor 31 extends from the left hand edge of the body 50 as illustrated in the drawing.

The collet 52 as shown clearly in FIG. 4 is of cylindrical configuration and has a longitudinal slit 56. The ends of the collet inlcudes tapers 57 and 58 and the center of the collet has a peripheral groove 59. When the collet 52 is inserted in the body 50 as illustrated, the tapered end 57 engages the taper 60 within the body and the right hand end of the body includes a downwardly extending flange 61 which engages the groove 59 to hold the collet in place. The right hand end of the body 50 includes threads 62 and a groove is disposed at the inner end of the thread 62 to receive an 0" ring 63.

The nut 64 includes internal threads 65 for cooperation with the threads 62, an inclined portion 66 for cooperation with the tapered end 58 of the collet, and a cylindrical opening 67 for slidably receiving the coaxial cable 32. The opening portion 67 has an annular groove to receive an 0 ring 68. With this arrangement, as the nut is threadably engaged with the body and with the coaxial cable extending through the nut and collet and urged against the left hand end of the body as shown in FIG. 3, the collet will be reduced in diameter by reason of the action of the tapers 60 and 66 and cause the collet to firmly engage and grip the outer surface of the cable 32. At the same time the 0" rings 63 and 68 will seal the connector. The collet 52 preferably includes a serrated inner surface as shown at 52' in FIG. 4 to provide a positive electrical connection with the cable.

FIGS. 5 and 6 illustrate a form'of the invention for coupling the ends of two coaxial cables to form a splice. Inasmuch as both the left and right hand halves of the connector shown in these figures are each similar in structure to the right half of the connector as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, corresponding numerals have been utilized to identify like elements in the right hand portions of FIGS. 1 and 2 and FIGS. 5 and 6. Further, since the left and right halves of the connector shown in FIGS. 5 and 6 are identical, like numerals have been used to denote corresponding elements in each half except that the numerals on the left half of the connector are followed by the letter a. In the structure shown in FIGS. 5 and 6, the receptacles 23 and 23a are electrically coupled to an enlarged cylindrical portion 70 and, preferably, the portion 70 is formed integrally with the receptacles 23 and 23a. The insulating means 17 and 17a abut the cylindrical portion 70 coupling the receptacles and are held in position within the center of the body 11 by depending flanges 71 and 72. To facilitate assembly, the flange 71 is preferably formed in the body during the machining process while the flange 72 is swaged after insertion of the elements to retain the receptacles 23 and 23a and the insulating means 17 and 17a centrally located within the body. Inasmuch as the mode of attachment of cables 32 to each end of the connector as shown in FIGS. 5 and 6 correspond precisely to the mode of connection as described in con nection with FIGS. 1 and 2, further description is not deemed necessary.

The embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8 illustrates the versatility of applicants invention for use in coupling a coaxial cable of one diameter to a cable of another diameter. In this embodiment of the invention the right hand portion of the connector body 75 corresponds precisely to the right hand portion of the body 11 shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 and corresponding body and internal connector portions of FIGS. 1 and 2 and FIGS. 7 and 8 are denoted by like numerals. In the form of the invention shown in FIGS. 7 and 8, the left hand portion of the body 75 is of reduced diameter and is threaded as denoted by the numeral 76 to receive a nut of smaller diameter than the nut 12. The connector assembly in the left hand portion of the body which is generally denoted by the numeral 77 includes a cylindrical insulator 78 having openings 79 and 80 or relatively large diameter formed in the ends thereof and a central opening 81 of relatively small diameter coupling the openings 79 and 80. The left hand end of the insulator 78 has an external section 82 of reduced diameter to slidably receive a cap 82 of insulating material. An electrical connector generally denoted by the numeral 84 has an elongated stem 85 extending through the insulator 78 and has a tab 86 to limit movement to the right as shown in FIG. 7. The left hand end of the stem 85 includes a U-shaped spring contract structure 86 having legs 87 and 88. The leg 88 includes two spaced parallel tabs 89 carried by the end thereof so that the outer end of the leg 87 will be guided therebetween and thus alignment of the legs 87 and 88 will be maintained at all times. The cap 83 has an opening 90 therein so that when the cap is in position on the insulator 78 as shown in FIG. 8, a conductor can be inserted through the opening 90 to electrically engage the terminal structure 84. The right hand end of the stem 85 of the terminal structure 84 is welded or soldered as denoted by the numeral 91 in FIG. 8 to the conductor 25 extending from the insulating means 17.

In this way the terminal structure 84 is electircally coupled to the receptacle 23.

The assembly as described in connection with FIGS. 7 and 8 above is inserted into the body 75 from the right hand end thereof until the assembly 77 abuts the inwardly extending flange 92 on the left hand end of the body 75. An inwardly formed flange 93 is then formed by swaging or other suitable means and engages the right hand end of the enlarged portion of the insulating means 17 to retain the elements in position. Thereafter the collet 27 is inserted as described in connection with FIGS. 1 and 2.

From the foregoing description it is evident that with the novel and improved connected structure for coaxial cables, substantially identical elements may be utilized to form a variety of different types of connectors such as the so-called feed-through or chassis mount connector of FIGS. 1 and 2, the splicing connector of FIGS. 5 and 6 and the adapter of FIGS. 7 and 8. In each case a relatively low loss moisture-proof connection is provided and by reason of the utilization of a split receptacle in the body and a split collet in the nut, positive electrical connection with the outer shield and the inner conductor of a coaxial cable is provided.

While only certain embodiments of the inventionhave been illustrated and described, it is apparent that alterations, modifications and changes may be made without departing from the true scope and spirit thereof as defined by the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A connector for coaxial cable having an outer shield and a central insulated conductor with a portion extending from the shield comprising a hollow body having an externally threaded portion on one end thereof,

slotted tubular insulating means within the said housing having a tapered end portion,

a slotted female receptacle within the slotted tubular insulating means for receiving said extending central conductor portion,

the other end of said body including an externally threaded portion and said receptacle including a conductive pin extending from said other end of said body,

a collet within said body with at least one end of the opening in said collet being tapered and in engagement with the tapered portion of said insulating means,

a nut threadably engaging said body and including cable gripping means through which said coaxial cable extends and means carried by said nut for sealing said cable in said nut and sealing means carried by said body for forming a seal between said body and said nut,

said gripping means gripping said outer cable shield when said cable is inserted through the nut and the conductor portion is in engagement with said receptacle.

whereby the inward displacement of the nut upon being tightened urges the end of said cable against said collet and displaces said collet inwardly,

the inward movement of the collet forcing its tapered portion into tight engagement with the tapered portion of said insulating means thus reducing the diameter thereof and urging the walls of said receptacle into tight engagement with said conductor portion, and said gripping means in said nut further including a split metal collet having externally tapered end portion of the opening therein tapered toreceive an end of said metal collet, said collars and metal collet being slidably retained with said nut, one of said collars engaging the end of said body when said nut is placed in threaded engagement therewith whereby. tightening said nut decreases the distance between said collars and thereby effects a reduction in diameter of said split collet causing it to firmly grip the coaxial cable and make electrical contact therewith.

2. A connector according to claim 1 including an 0 ring disposed between said other collar and the end of said nut and a second 0 ring carried by said body at the inner end of said threaded portion.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification439/584
International ClassificationH01R9/05
Cooperative ClassificationH01R9/0521
European ClassificationH01R9/05P