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Publication numberUS3854942 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 17, 1974
Filing dateJan 8, 1973
Priority dateMar 21, 1972
Publication numberUS 3854942 A, US 3854942A, US-A-3854942, US3854942 A, US3854942A
InventorsAkman A
Original AssigneeXerox Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Transparency for multi-color electrostatic copying
US 3854942 A
Abstract
A transparency is disclosed, which is suitable for use in a multi-colored xerographic reproduction process comprising a transparent, thermoplastic film sheet having at least one surface coated with a mixture consisting of a vinyl chloride-acetate copolymer resin and an acrylic resin in a weight ratio of between about 6:4 and 7:3, with a wetting agent in said mixture in an amount between about 2.5 to 25% by weight of said mixture. In a preferred embodiment, a percentage of a particulate material is also incorporated in the coating to reduce static charge on the transparency and permit easier handling thereof. The coated transparency, when used in a multi-colored electrostatic copying process improves adhesion of the multi-colored image thereon and permits reproduction of colors and color densities in said image which correspond well to the multi-colored original copied.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 Akman 14 1 Dec. 17, 1974 TRANSPARENCY FOR MULTI-COLOR ELECTROSTATIC COPYING [75] Inventor: Alptekin Akman, Ontario, NY.

[73] Assignee: Xerox Corporation, Stamford,

Conn.

[22] Filed: Jan. 8, 1973 21 Appl. No.: 321,511

Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation-impart of Ser, Nos. 236,585 March 21, V

1972, which isa continuation-in-part of Ser. No. l... fh 4 all9y.- lll.. .7 2f

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,148,985 9/1964 Ossenbrunner et a1. 117/76 F 3,355,308 11/1967 Walkup 117/37 LE 3,447,947 6/1969 Abbott et al. 117/76 F 3,472,687 10/1969 Masuda 96/l.4 3,479,198 11/1969 Barth 117176 F 2/1970 'Johnson et a1 1l7/17.5

3,522,072 7/1970; Florence et a1. 117/76 F 3,535,112 10/1970 Dolce et a1. 96/l.4

3,539,340 11/1970 Dolce 96/l.4 3,539,341 ll/l970 Dolce et a1. 96/1.4 3,549,360 12/1970 O'Neill et a1. 1l7/l7.5 3,597,373 8/1971 Bregoff et a1. 117/l38.8 A 3,600,210 8/1971 Haycock. 117/l7.5

Primary Examiner-Michael Sofocleous [5 7] 3 ABSTRACT A transparency is disclosed, which is suitable for use in a multi-colored xerographic reproduction process comprising a transparent, thermoplastic film sheet having at least one surface coated with a mixture consisting of a vinyl chloride-acetate copolymer resin and an acrylic resin in a weight ratio of between about 6:4 and 7:3, with a wetting agent in said mixture in an amount between about 2.5 to 25% by weight of said 17 Claims, No Drawings 1 TRANSPARENCY FOR MULT I-COLOR ELECTROSTATIC COPYING BACKGROUNDOF THElNVENTlON This application isa continuation in part application of my previous application under Ser. No. 236,585, filed Mar 21, 1972, which application is a continuation in part of application Ser. No. 194,547 filed Nov. 1, 1972.

.This invention relates ,to xerographic reproduction dividual who is familiar with complex photographic reproduction processes. Photographic reproduction of transparencies also requiresthe expenditure of a large amount of time and money and is thus undesirable for this reason. Therefore, an easy and inexpensive means for the production of transparencies has been sought whereby transparencies could be conveniently and economically imaged and then used an unlimited number of times in visual education programs.

The advent of xerography and electrostatic copying as generally disclosed by Carlson in U.S. Pat. No. 2,297,691 has proven to be a highly successfulprocess for reproduction with the inherent advantages of speed and reliability. In a usual xerographic process, an electrostatic image on an object as formed on a recording member such as a xerographic plate or drum. The xerographic plate may comprise a layer of photoconductive material, such asselenium on a conductive metal backing. The latent electrostatic image which is formed ,on the photoconductive material is developed into a powder image which is then subsequently transferred to a sheet of paper and affixed thereon to form a permanenet'print.

The xerographic processhas therefore proventobe an easy'and reliable meansfor the production of transparencies. Transparencies made by a xerographic process are produced by forming an electrostatic image of the desired object, developing it, and then transferring it to a transparent sheet material with the image being permanently affixed or fused thereto by either the application of heat or by the action of a solvent vapor. ln

either case the toner which is used to develop'the powdered'imageis coalesced on the sheet material by the fusing technique to form a permanent image thereon. Solvent fusion techniques, for transparent materials made'by a xerographic process, for example, are illustrated in U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,049,810 and 3,148,078.

While the xerographic reproduction process is an apparent solution to the problem of economical and efficient production of transparencies, other problems have also been encountered with its use in the production of transparencies. One: of the most pronounced problems with producing transparencies by an electrostatic copying process is to get the powdered or developed image to adhere well to a transparent film material before the'image is permanently affixed thereto by fusing. Failure to achieve this, results in partial or cracked" images. A further problem encountered in obtaining proper and uniform density of the image after fixing or fusionand without resultant damage to the transparentfilmmaterial either'in the fusion process or in the transfer system employed within the machine. For this reason, various coating and combinations thereof with various types of transparent sheet materials have been previously proposed to obviate some of these difficulties. Included are various single component polymeric coatings such as are exemplified in U.S.

Pat. Nos. 3,539,340; 3,539,341 and 3,535,112.

The above coatings, while of some assistance in improving adhesion of the developed electrostatic image to a transparent film material, nevertheless, are not entirely suitable when transparencies are produced by a multi-colored xerographic imaging process. The difficulties encountered with a multi-colored imaging process andtransparencies produced thereby are due in part to the multi-component pigment developers required in the multi-colored imaging process and their varying degree of attraction for the transparent sheet material. Furthermore, the problem of getting the correct degree of coalescence of the toner particles in the permanent image is an even more critical matter with multi-colored imaging than with single color image development. This increased criticality is due to the fact that single color transparent images only require complete opaqueness or non-opaqueness of varying degrees to produce a transparency which has images suitable for "projection. Multi-colored transparency images, on the other hand, must allow for a certain degree of color density for each color or color combination in the image which is sufficient and uniform enough to allow projection of a uniform and true color. This therefore, requires a different and unique combination of materials being employed and more critical controls being immposed upon the transparent materials which are used in a multicolor xerographic imaging process to obtain the correct degree of attraction of toner to the transparent sheetas well as proper coalescence of toner particles for'good color density.

It is'an object of the present invention therefore, to provide for a transparency upon which a multi-colored .xerographic image may be permanently affixed with uniform and consistent color reproduction and density.

These and other objects, as well as the scope, natureand utilization of invention will be apparent by the following detailed description and appended claims.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It has now been determined that the general objective of producing a transparency which will permanently hold a true and consistent multi-color xerographic image may be best achieved by utilizing a transparent, thermoplastic, film sheet such as a polysulfone or polycarbonate sheet material, followed by the coating of this sheet prior to xerographic imaging with a mixture of a vinyl chloride-acetate copolymer resin, an

acrylic resin, such as poly n-alkyl methacrylate, and a wetting agent such as a quaternary ammonium salt or fatty acid amide. It is this coating composition which has been found to insure that all colored pigments required in the multi-colored reproduction process are properly attracted to and held by the transparent sheets during imaging and sheet transfer so that a permanent image having uniform and accurate color densities may be then fused on the transparent sheet. This coating overcomes the previously noted difficulties with producing a transparency by a multi-colored electrostatic copying process, among which are poor adherence of the developed xerographic image on the transparent film, as well as difficulty in insuring that a consistent and true color density is developed from the colored original which will also be suitable for projection or magnification on a screen. As indicated, these problems while existing with single color xerographic imaging, are even more pronounced when a multi-colored xerographic process is employed.

It has been further determined that if the coating mixture also includes a particulate material which is relatively inert, such as for example, asbestos, silica, colloidal silica and the like, the coated transparency is characterized by an exceptional reduction in its static properties to allow easy handling of the transparency through the frictional paper handling system of the machine, as well as permit multiple sheet feeding through the machine without jamming or sticking therein.

Sheets which are coated with a mixture containing an effective amount of a particulate material to reduce the static properties of the sheet, also assist in toner transfer to the sheet during development, since if a high degree of static charge builds up on the sheet because of friction through the handling system, it can reduce the degree of attraction for the electroscopic toner particles used todevelop the image and in fact may repel the toner particles thus preventing development of the image. The coating which also includes a particulate material therein, because of a reduction in static charge buildup, assists in toner transfer to transparent films.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In the process of multi-colored xerographic reproduction, a subtractive color to color reproduction technique is used to develop images formed on the photoconductive layer. Furthermore, a multi-color xerographic imaging process may also employ multiple scanning of the colored original at different wavelengths of light to produce multiple images corresponding to each primary color involved in the original. These primary color images may be then recombined to form a single multi-colored image corresponding to the original by using a multi-component or multicolored toner in a subtractive color to color reproduction process. A subtractive color to color reproduction process is illustrated in U.S. Pat. No.'3,057,720.

Toners which are, employed in multi-color xerography use subtractive primary colors, yellow, cyan (blue green) and magenta. These in turn are used to reproduce a wide gamut of colors normally found in, the colored original. For the purposes of illustration, when subtractive mixing of the yellow and cyan colorants take place, greens are obtained. Likewise, the mixing of magenta and yellow colorant in varying amounts reproduces reds, while combining the cyan with magenta results in the reproduction of blues. Mixtures of equal amounts of each'toner, of course, will produce a black image.

Production of themulti-colored copy from the colored original may be appropriately achieved by any multi-colored xerographic imaging process. It is not intended that this invention be limited by particular variations in the multi-colored xerographic imaging processes that might be employed or with the equipment used in said process. Nevertheless, for the purposes of illustration, a suitable process for color imaging begins with proper discernment of the color composition of the original subject matter and recording thereof. This ,may be conveniently accomplished by sequential optical scanning of the color original a number of times to formulate a sequence of the latent electrostatic images which correspond to the primary colors in the original. This is accomplished by the light image passing through an appropriate color filter so that the latent image is then in effect, color separated according to the various primary colors. Theoretically, the latent image which is formed by passing the light image through a green filter should require the magentas (the complementary color) as areas of relatively high charge density on the drum surface, while the green (the separated color) should cause a low-charged density level. The magentas are then made visible by applying a green absorbing magenta toner to the image bearing member. By the same token, a blue separation is developed with a cyan toner. The three developed color separations are then brought together in registration upon the final sheet of support material to produce a multi-colored facsimile of the original colored document copy.

It is this multi-component developer system used in a substrative color to color reproduction process which presents numerous problems when, for example, a color transparency is produced thereby which will reproduce, with uniform and accurate consistency the color densities which correspond to the colored original.

In the production of transparencies by a multicolored xerographic imaging process according to the present invention, a transparent, thermoplastic film sheet material is selected as the support material upon which the multi-colored xerographic image to be developed. Although the sheet material may be any suitable thermoplastic film material which has the clearness, strength and heat resistance to allow repeated projection thereof, materials which are particularly preferred for the present invention include thermoplastic films made from theromplastic resins such as the polysulfones or polycarbonates.

Thermoplastic sheet material which may be conveniently utilized in the present invention includes polysulfone sheet materials which are commercially available from Rowland Products Inc., Kensington, Connecticut and Instar Supply Co., Inc., New York, NY. under the name Folacron'PSN, as well as polycarbonate sheet materials commercially available from General Electric Corp., Waterford, N.Y. under the name Lexan SL 1007. These materials may be selected from any thickness range desired, although in selecting film thickness, the films should be thick enough to have the necessary strength but still be thin enough to remain flexible throughout continuous use thereof. A suitable thicknessof the film suitable for use in xerographic imaging, will generally be 3 to 8 mils.

The thermoplastic film material is'then coated with a mixed, polymeric coating composition which has been found to significantly improve adhesion of a multi-colored xerographic image to a transparency during the xerographic development process while at the same time during image fusion, permitting accurate reproduction of color density of the transparency. The coating in this regard has been found to assist in permanent fixing or fusing of the developed image to the transparency by either solvent vapor or heat fusion techniques, although solvent vapor fusion is preferred as the method of fusion for'transparencies produced according to the present invention.

In a preferred embodiment of, the present invention, it has also been determined that if the coating contains a relatively inert particulate material, a transparency is provided which is characterized by an exceptional reduction in its static properties, permitting easier handling thereof as well as permitting multiple sheet feeding of the sheets through the paper handling system without feeding problems from the paper feeding tray. The coating developed herein comprises a mixture of a vinyl chloride-acetate copolymer resin, an acrylic resin such as a poly n-alkyl methacrylate, and a wetting agent such as a quaternary ammonium salt or fatty acid amide and as a preferred embodiment, incorporation of a relatively inert particulate material. This coating mixturewill be normally applied to the transparent film material in the form of a solution and because of this, the choice of solvents to provide the solution is important, relative to the coating composition, since it must not cloud or change the film material and it must at the same time provide enough solubility for the coating composition to provide a clear uniform coating on the transparency with no evidence of component insolubility. it will, of course, be understood that when a coating mixture is employed which contains arelatively inert particulate material, the latter will ordinarily be insolu ble, being in suspension in the solution of the other components of the coating mixture.

The solvent composition found to be suitable for use with the present composition and for its application to transparencies produced therewith is a mixture of 2- ethoxy ethanol and a ketone, preferably methyl isobutyl ketone. The mixture of these solvents which is used to dissolve the coating composition of the present inthen added to the aforementioned solvent mixture and dissolved. The preferred amounts of materials utilized in the coating composition of the present invention include a ratio of the acrylic resin'to the vinyl chlorideacetate copolymer resin of between about 6:4 and 7:3 by weight of the mixture..lf the-ratio of these two ingredients falls above this range, an undesirable tackiness would result with the coating, while if the ratio falls below this range, poor image adhesion results. The wetting agent is also in an amount of between 2.5 to 25% a by weight of the coating composition mixture, and this percentage range increases toner transfer to the film substrate as well as produce a more uniform consistent and brilliantly colored image. i

In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, a particulate material is included in the coating composition in an amount of between about 1 and 20% by weight of the polymeric components of the mixture, i.e., the acrylic and vinyl chloride-acetate copolymer resin. This particular percentage range has been found to be the most effective means for reducing static charge buildup on the transparent sheet through the paper handling system of the machine under varying conditions of relative humidity. Obviously, since the degree of static charge buildup will be somewhat dependent on the relative humidity of the environment, the percentage of particulate material may be varied over a wider range depending on the amount that is needed to reduce the static charge to an acceptable level without a deleterious effect on the transparency of the sheet.

The particulate material which is added to the coating for reduction of the static charge on the transparent sheet under handling conditions; adds a degree of bulk to the coating and due to its protrusion through the coating imparts a certain degree of roughness or texturing on the transparency surface, even though this texturing may not be be readily discernible to the unaided eye. This texturing or roughness succeeds in rethe multi-colored xerographic image to the transparency. It is also this combination of ingredients which allows correct reproduction of color density in the fused image, as well as giving strength to the film which is needed for sheet transfer during copying and continuous use of the transparency after formation. The ingredients used must also be compatible with the multicomponent toners used for the subtractive color reproduction processes and accordingly prevent precipitation or deposition of the toner as discrete, recognizable, particles in the final developed image as opposed to coalescence and formation of a uniform and consistent toner film. If the toner is deposited as recognizable and discrete particles, then an image is produced which has a dirty or spotty look and the color density thus becomes eratic. The coating materials must therefore be comparible with the toner materials used to develop the multi-color images, while at the same time being transparent and'yet strong enough to permit normal handling of transparencies.

The vinyl chloride-acetate copolymer material which may be used in the coating composition of the present besides also preventing excessive curling of the transparency after subsequent fusion techniques.

The acrylic resin is added to and improves adhesion and fixing of the toner and may be conveniently selected from among the various poly n-alkyl acrylic resins such as the polymerized n-alkyl methacrylates which are commercially available from E. I. duPont deNemours and Co. and available under the trade name of Lucite. Although various-alkylated methacrylates will be suitable for use in the present invention, nevertheless, the butyl methacrylates such as Lucite 44, 45,and 46 are preferred for use in the present coating composition.

A wetting agent is added to the coating composition of the present invention to improve colored toner flow and coalescence over the coating during the subsequent vapor fusing operation. The material also aids in wetting the toner particles so as to give more uniform, brilliant, and consistent colors besides improving color density in the transparency. The addition of the wetting agent further improves the surficial characteristics of the transparency itself and assists in reduction of the static properties thereof, at least under conditions of i high humidity, in order to prevent sticking together of g the transparencies either before or after imaging. Materials which are specifically preferred as the wetting agents in the present inventionare quaternary ammonium salts and fatty acid amides such as are available from Armour Industrial Chemical C0., Chicago, Ill. and sold under the trade name of Arquad 2 I-IT-75 Armid O, Armid C or Armostat 310.

In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the particulate material which is added to the coating to texturize the surface of the transparency may be selected from a group of relatively inert, particulate materials including asbestos, silica, or colloidal silica and can be conveniently added to the coating during dissolution of the polymeric materials. As previously noted, a preferred range for addition is between about.l to 20% by weight of the mixture of polymeric components which comprise the vinyl chloride-acetate copolymer resin and acrylic resins. This range of addition allows for a sufficient degree of reduction of static charge on the sheet under varying conditions of relative humidity to permit easy handling and multiple sheet feeding without having a deleterious effect on the clearness or transparency of the thermoplastic film. It should be recognized however, that the particulate material could be employed outside of this range dependent on the ambient conditions the sheet might be used under as long as an acceptable decrease in static properties of the sheet occurs without affecting the transparency of thefilm sheet. Transmission measurements made over the wavelength region of active light on transparencies containing the particulate material indicate substantially the same transmission is obtained with the uncoated sheet as with the coated sheet containing the particulate material. V

The coating composition after dissolution in the appropriate solvent mixture is appliedto the transparent thermoplastic film by techniques which are well known tor blade on the coating may be applied by use of a more precise coating apparatus such as a gravure press. Preferably a coating of between about 0.1 and 0.7 mils thickness is produced upon the transparent thermoplastic film sheet after evaporation of a solvent or solidification of the dissolved polymeric materials. Since the polymeric coating on the sheet is in the nature of an extremely thin film, no significant impairment of the transparency of the sheet itself results from its presence and the transparency formed therfrom by electrostatic image, processes the requisite degree of clearness to be satisfactory for most visual education purposes.

The following is giving a specific illustration of the present invention although it should be understood that the invention is not intended to be limited to specific details 'to be set forth thereon.

1 EXAMPLE I A transparent, thermoplastic film material with dimensions of 8% X l 1 inches consisting of a polysulfone transparent sheet having a thickness of 5 mils was used as the substrate for a coating'composition which was prepared by forming a solution of 45 parts of 2- ethoxyethanol, and 15 parts'of methyl isobutyl ketone, followed by the addition thereto of:

7 g. n-butyl methacrylate 3 g. vinyl chloride acetate copolymer resin (86% vinyl chloride, 13% acetate) 0.5 g. dialkyl quaternary ammonium chloride (Arquad 2 HT-75, Armour Industrial Chemical Co.)

This was mixed until a clear solution was obtained followed by the application of the coating composition to the polysulfone sheet with a No. 20 Mayer Rod, followed by drying of the coated sheet with warm air. After evaporation of the solvents used in applying the coating, a coating thickness of about 03 mils was obtained.

The coated transparent sheet material was subjected to a multi-colored xerographic imaging process with resultant vapor fusion of the adherent multicolored image. It was observed that superior image adhesion occurred both before and after vapor fusion and more toner transfer was obtained with a highly uniform and accurate colored image being formed. The colors reproduced were uniformed, with consistent color den sity and no evidence of toner spotting. Additionally, the multi-colored transparencies exhibited low frictional and static properties when compared with uncoated transparencies.

EXAMPLE 2 This coated transparent sheet material was subjected to a multi-colored xerographic imaging process, and superior image adhesion to the transparent sheet occurred both before and after vapor fusion to fix the image. Furthermore, excellent toner transfer to the sheet occurred with a resultant improvement in uniformity of the colored image and the density thereof. The imaged transparency also exhibited less friction and a decrease in static properties, and the image thereon corresponded well in color to the original.

7 EXAMPLE 3 The procedure of Example 1 was followed and with the exception that to the solution of 45 parts of 2- ethoxyethanol and parts of methyl isobutyl ketone, the following mixture was added.

7 g. n-butyl methacrylate 3 g. vinyl chloride acetate copolymer resin (86% vinyl chloride, 13% vinyl acetate) 2.0 g. dialkyl quaternary ammonium chloride (Arquad 2 HT-75, Armour Chemical Co.)

This was mixedwell with the solvent mixture until a clear solution was obtained followed by application to the polysulfone sheet material as set forth in Example 1. The resultant coating thickness after drying was about 0.3 mils.

When this coated transparent sheet material was subjected to a multi-colored xerographic imaging process, superior image adhesion resulted both before and after vapor fusion which was used to fix the image. Furthermore, good toner transfer occurred with uniform and consistent colors being produced which correspond well to those of the colored original.

EXAMPLE 4 Three transparent polysulfone sheet materials as in Example 1 were coated according to the procedure of Example l and were designated as sheets A, B, and C. The sample designationscorresponded to the following formulations used to prepare the coating used for each Sample C:

2 g. n-butyl methacrylate 8 g. vinyl chloride acetate copolymer resin (86% vinyl chloride, 13% vinyl acetate) dissolved in a mixture of 45 parts of 2-ethoxyethanol and 15 parts of methyl isobutyl ketone.

Each coated sheet was subjected to a multi-colored xerographic imaging process, with resultant examination of the quality of the image on the transparent sheet material.

Sample A was observed to have good image quality with good color density and uniformity although the coating had an undesirable tackiness.

Samples B and C were observed to have good image quality with good color density and uniformity although adhesion of the image before and after vapor fusion was poor.

EXAMPLE 5 A series of six transparent, thermoplastic film sheets having approximate dimensions of 8 /2 X l 1 inches consisting of polysulfone material and with a thickness of 5 mils were used as the substrates for the following six coating compositions, all of which were prepared by forming a solution of 45 parts of 2-ethoxyethanol and 15 parts of methyl isobutyl ketone. Each of the following mixtures were dissolved or dispersed in the solvent mixture followed by their application to each of the respective polysulfone sheets with a No. 20 Mayer Rod. The coated sheets were dried with a current of warm air, and after evaporation of the solvents used in applyingthe coating, a coating thickness of about 0.3 mils was obtained. The coated sheets were designated according to the compositionsused for the respective coating thereof according to the following formulations. Sheet 1:

7 g. n-butyl methacrylate 3 g. vinyl chloride acetate copolymer resin (86% vinyl chloride, 13% vinyl acetate) l g. wetting agent (Armostat 310, Armour Industrial Chemical Co.)

Sheet 2:

7 g. n-butyl methacrylate 3 g. vinyl chloride acetate copolymer resin (86% vinyl chloride, 13% vinyl acetate) 1 g. wetting agent (Armostat 310, Armour Industrial Chemical Co.) 0.1 g. asbestos Sheet 3:

7g. n-butyl methacrylate 3 g'.vinyl chloride acetate copolymer resin (86%vinyl chloride, 13% vinyl acetate) 1 g. wetting agent (Armostat 310, Armour Industrial Chemical Co.) 0.5 g; asbestos Sheet 4:

7 g. n-butyl methacrylate 3 g. vinyl chloride acetate copolymer resin (86% vinyl chloride, 13% vinyl acetate) 1 g. wetting agent (Armostat 310, Armour industrial Chemical Co.) 1 g. asbestos Sheet 5:

7 g. n-butyl methacrylate 3 g. vinyl chloride acetate copolymer resin (86% vinyl chloride 13% vinyl acetate) 0.5 g. wetting agent (Armostat 310, Armour Industrial Chemical Co.)

l g. asbestos Sheet 6:

7 g. n-butyl methacrylate I 3 g. vinyl chloride acetate copolymer resin 0.5 g. wetting agent (Armostat 310, Armour Industrial Chemical Co.)

1 g. colloidal silica (Cab-o-Sil, Cabot Corporation) After coating and drying, the six coated sheets were subjected to feeding tests in a multi-colored electrostatic copier, and their ability to machine feed evaluated. Further, the static and kinetic coefficient of friction was measured for each coated sheet against itself according to ASTM procedure D 1894-64, entitled Standard Method of Test for Coefficients of Friction of Polgsulfone Polycarbonate heet Sheet 6. A transparency for the formation of an adherent. multi-colored electrostatic image-thereon comprising a thermoplastic film sheet, said sheet having at least one surface coated with a mixture which comprises an acrylic resin and a vinyl chloride-acetate copolymer resin in a weight ratio of between about 6:4 and 7:3, :1

wetting agent in an amount of between about 2.5 to 25% by weight of said mixture and a particulate material in an amount of between 1 to 20% by weight of said resins to reduce the static properties of said sheet.

7. A transparency as set forth in claim 6 wherein said particulate material is asbestos, silica or colloidal silica. 8. A transparency as set forthinclaim 6 wherein said thermoplastic film sheet is polysulfone or polycarbon- 5 ate.

( uncoated (uncoated Coated Coated Coated Coated Coated Coated Control Control Sheet 1 Sheet 2 Sheet 3 Sheet 4 Sheet 5 Sheet 6 1. Machine Feeding Wont feed Won't feed Poor Fair Fair Good Good Good Characteristics 2. 71 Transmission 7 ma. 87% 88% 88% 560 my.. 90% 89% 89% 700 my. 92% 89% 89% .3. Coefficients of 1.0 .50/.44 .43/.44 .48/.48 .64/.59 .72/.66 .3l/.27 .40/.45 Friction (static coefficient of friction/kinetic coefficient of friction) it may be ,seen from the data set forth that the transparencies which were coated with coating compositions which additionally contained a particulate material such as asbestos or silica, exhibited improved machine feeding properties and better coefficients of friction than the coated sheets which did not contain a particulate material.

Although the invention has been described both various embodiments, it is understood that variations and modifications may be made as will be apparent to those skilled in the art. Such reasonable variations and modifications are furthermore considered to be within the spirit and scope of the claims appended hereto.

What is claimed is:

1. A transparency for the formation of an adherent electrostatic image thereon comprising a thermoplastic film sheet, said sheet having at least one surface coated with a mixture which comprises an acrylic resin, and a vinyl chlorideacetate copolymer resin in a weight ratio of between about 6:4 and 7:3, a wetting agent in an amount of between about 2.5 to by weight of said mixture with an effective amount of a particulate material in said mixture to reduce the static properties of 55 polycarbon- 9. A transparency as set forth in claim 6 wherein said coating on said sheet has a thickness of between abou 35 0.1 and 0.7 mils.

10. A method of xerographically preparing a color transparency copy comprising:

a. forming a single color powder image of a multicolored original to be reproduced; b. transferring the powder image to a transparency comprising a thermoplastic film sheet, said sheet having at least one surface coated with a mixture which comprises an acrylic resin, and a vinyl chloride-acetate copolymer resin in a weight ratio of between about 6:4 and 7:3, a wetting agent in an amount between about 2.5 to 25% by weight of said mixture with an effective amount of a particulate material in said mixture to reduce the static properties of said sheet; and 4 c. fixing the powder image on the transparency.

11. The method of claim 10 wherein the steps of powder image formation and transfer are repeated before the fixing step, each sequence corresponding to the formation of a differentcolor to effect multi-color reproduction, said transfer of each developed electrostatic imagetaking place in registration on the transparency. 1 2. The method of claim 10 wherein the ried out by vapor fusion.

13. The method of claim 10 wherein the transparency used in transfer step contains particulate material in an amountof about 1 to 20% by weight of the resin material.

14. The method of claim 10 wherein the coating on the transparency used in the transfer step has a thickness of about 0.1 to 0.7 mils.

fixing is car- 15. The method of claim 10 wherein the transpara. exposing a charged photoconductive member to a ency used in the transfer step contains asbestos, silica filtered light image of the multi-colored original to or colloidal silica as a bulking agent. record a single color electrostatic latent image 16. The method of claim 10 wherein the transparthereon; and

ency used in the transfer step is a thermoplastic film b. developing the single color electrostatic latent sheet of polysulfone or polycarbonate. image with toner particles complementary in color 17. The method of claim wherein the step of formthereto. ing a single color powder image comprises:

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION 1 PATENINO. 3,854,942 DATED December 17, 1974 INVENTOR(S) Alptekin Akman It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 12, Claim 6, line 9, after the word "between" the word about should appear.

Signed and sealed this 29th day of April 1975.

(SEAL) Attest C MARSHALL DANN RUTH C. MASON Commissioner of Patents Attesting Officer and Trademarks UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION PATENT NO. 3,854,942 DATED December 17, 1974 |NvENTOR(S) Alptekin Akman it is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 12, Claim 6, line 9, after the word "between" the word about should appear.

Signed and sealed this 29th day of April 1975.

(SEAL) Attest:

C. MARSHALL DANN RUTH C. MASON Commissioner of Patents Attesting Officer and Trademarks

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Classifications
U.S. Classification430/47.5, 428/443, 428/412, 427/393.5, 428/336, 428/451, 428/419, 430/124.52, 428/500
International ClassificationC08J7/00, G03G7/00, C08J7/04
Cooperative ClassificationG03G7/0013, C08J7/047, G03G7/002, G03G7/004
European ClassificationC08J7/04L, G03G7/00B4, G03G7/00B4B4, G03G7/00B2