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Publication numberUS3855366 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 17, 1974
Filing dateOct 16, 1972
Priority dateOct 16, 1972
Publication numberUS 3855366 A, US 3855366A, US-A-3855366, US3855366 A, US3855366A
InventorsChapman D
Original AssigneeChapman D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carburetor
US 3855366 A
Abstract
Carburetor for gasoline engine has connecting air-intake and gas mixture chambers separated by an adjustable, air-metering valve provided with throttle opening means of variable flow area and communicating with said connecting chambers for providing venturi effect. Gas metering member in gas mixture chamber adjustable with movement of valve to vary amount of gas globules metered out to mix with air throttled through the opening means in valve, according to demand of engine. Efficiency of carburetion improved by controlled suction of air at any given throttle opening, for combination with likewise controlled flow of gas globules, in a proportion with reference to said venturi effect which provides maximum power and performance efficiency at any given engine speed, while accomplishing substantially complete atomization of the gas globules at all engine speeds.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Elite Chapman 14 1 Dec. 17, 1974 CARBURETOR [76] Inventor: Donald L. Chapman, 191 Osceola Ave., Tallmadge, Ohio 44278 22 Filed: Oct. 16, 1972 21 Appl. No.2 298,187

[5 6] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Primary Examiner-Tim R. Miles 5 7 ABSTRACT Carburetor for gasoline engine has connecting airintake and gas mixture chambers separated by an adjustable, air-metering valve provided with throttle opening means of variable flow area and communicating with said connecting chambers for providing venturi effect. Gas metering member in gas mixture chamber adjustable with movement of valve to vary amount of gas globules metered out to mix with air throttled through the opening means in valve, accord- 2,681,216 6/1954 Knecht 261/78 R ng to em n of ngine. E ficiency of Carburetion im- 2,756,033 7/1956 Smithet a] 261/44 R proved by controlled suction of air at any given throt- 3,026095 3/ 6 amm llt a 261/50 R tle opening, for' combination with likewise controlled 3,086,758 4/1963 Greene 261/44 R fl f gas globules in a proportionwith reference to 33360l4 8/1967 h 261/44 R said venturi effect which provides maximum power 3350073 0/1967 261M412 and performance efficiency at any given engine speed, 3.406952 10/1968 White 26l/5OA h.] I. hi bt -t. H I t at 3,424441 1/1969 Caisley et a1 ...J261/50 A t accompls S Comp 3.472495 10/1969 Marsee et a]. 261/76 Ofthe gas globules at engme Speeds- 3 493,2l7 2/1970 Farley 261/44 R 1 3.709.469 1/1973 Edmonston ct 111. 261/44 R 3 6 Drawmg figures I /E 3 /5 f 7 9 W I 22b /29 i V I f 1 /O v 9 Z2 v v Q 7 M L 4- I i i /6 C) 0 Q 6- T1 1 p- -11rv K I KKK 4 I2 1 j I PATENTED DEC] 7 I974 SHEET 2 BF 3 PATENIED BEE 71974 sum 3 o 3 CARBURETOR BACKGROUND OF INVENTION Heretofore, carburetors, as for gasoline engines, have been of a general type including a device for sending air through or over a liquid fuel, so as to produce an explosive mixture. In other words, the process of carburetion includes charging air with hydrocarbon, such as gasoline in finely divided liquid form, whereby the resulting gas globules can be burned for production of energy. In spite of the vast number of improvements heretofore made in conventional carburetors, even the best of them have been inefficient in atomizing the gas globules, and in fact they only slobbered the gas out, especially at partial throttle. Such carburetors, have to a large extent, been unsatisfactory because when they were large enough for a given purpose they were too large for maximum efficiency at partial throttle, and when they were on the small side they were not sufficiently sensitive to accomplish good atomization of the gas but were too restrictive for accomplishing peak power performance.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION The present invention relates to an improved carburetor, as for a gasoline engine, by which maximum operating efficiency is accomplished by accurately controlling the effective atomization of the gas globules with reference to selectively variable sizes of aventuri opening in the carburetor. For the purpose of efficiently controlling the mixture of the air and gas globules, in proportion to the degreeof power required by an operator of the engine, a speed controlling accelerator is operable to shift a valving member across a passage between connecting air-intake and gas mixture chambers, selectively to vary the effective flow area of a throttle opening in the valving member, so that as the demand for power is increased, the flow area of the throttle opening is proportionately increased. With such opening movement of the valving member a gas supply tube, carried by the valving member and connected to a source of the gas, is likewise proportionately moved' with reference to a metering device located with the gas mixing chamber, to meter out the gas in requisite proportion to the changes in flow area of the throttle opening. Thus, by varying the'flow area of the venturi opening, the air pressure is varied proportionately and the speed of the air, and consequently that of the gas, is also varied. To this end, the gas metering device may include relatively movable parts which are operable by movement of the valving member to control the amount of atomized gas metered into the mixing chamber, in predetermined precise relationship to the controlled flow of 'air through the venturi opening to the mixing chamber. This gas metering device is particularly adaptable for mixing the. gas globules and air, self-adjustably' according to the requirements at various speeds of engine operation, to accomplish complete ignition and utilization of the gas globules at all such speeds.

Objects of the invention, other than as described above, will be manifest from the following brief description and the accompanying drawings.

Of the accompanying drawings:

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of a carburetor embodying the features of the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Referring to FIGS. 1 to of the drawings generally, and to FIGS. 3 to 5 in particular, the numeral desig nates a carburetor, embodying the features of the invention, mounted on an engine block B (see FIG. 2) and including a tubular housing 11 having integral flange means 12 for securing the vsame on block B, thereby to align a passage 13 through the housing with a passage 14 in the block B for connecting with a comof plate 18 to the bustion chamber (not shown) of the engine.

The carburetor 10 may comprise top and bottom sections 15 and 16, including complementally connected,

lateral extensions 15 and 16 thereof in a plane at right angles to the central axis of the tubular housing 11, and

defining laterally spaced guide slots l7, l7 forslidable reception of spaced side edges of a slide-valve plate 18, said plate serving to divide the passage 14 into an outer air-intake chamber 19 and an inner gas-mixing chamber 20. The plate 18 is provided with a throttle aperture means 22 therethrough, adapted to have a variable effective flow area, presented within the mixing chamber 20, the flow area being varied by sliding adjustment of the slide plate. As best shown in FIG. 4, the over-all size of the throttle aperture means 22 may be relatively large, with converging sides 22a thereof cooperating with the passage 14 of chamber 20 thereby defining a relatively small, generally triangular, air-throttling opening communicating with the axially aligned chambers l9 and 20, which triangular opening can beselectively enlarged in effective flow area by said movement right in the condition shown in FIGS. 1 to 5. I Affixed to the slide plate 18, exteriorly of the tubular housing 11, to be movable with said plate, may be a fluid-gas supply tube 23 which extends through the wall 16a of the bottom section- 16, below plate 18, and is slidably received through a-perforated, gas-metering tube 24, suitably affixed between diametrically opposite wall portions of the passage 13, to be in otherwise fluid sealed relation thereto. Fluid gas may be supplied to the tube 23 from a source thereof (not shown), through flexible tubing 23a and the gas flow from the supply tube 23 into mixing chamber 20 is adapted to be automatically adjusted or varied by any sliding movement of the slide plate 18.

' To this end, a free end of the gas-metering tube 24 within the tube 23, may be provided "with a suitable opening 24a for centered reception therethrough of a tapered metering needle 25, which is selectively adjustably afiixed to the passage wall 13. The arrangement is such that in all positions'of axial sliding movement of thegas supply tube 23 with reference to the tapered needle 25, gas supplied through said tube 23 exits into the adjusted, enclosed space 27 at the corresponding end of the metering tube, to be sucked through one or more uncovered apertures 28, 28 of one or more series thereof extending longitudinally along the wall of the metering tube 24 (see FIG. 5).

Accordingly, in all axially adjusted positions of the gas supply tube 23 and with all effective diameters of the tapered needle presented through the hole 24a in the exit end of the supply tube, the fixed metering tube 24 accurately controls the amount of gas'being metered out directly in proportion to the amount and speed of the air rushing through the effective venturi opening 22b, the variable flow area of which opening is controlled by the speed, or power required to be obtained from the engine. A V-shaped hood or shield 29 may be affixed in the throttle passage 14 to overlie the length of the gas-metering tube 24, for deflecting the air rushing through venturi opening 22b, uniformly to pass around said metering tube.

In use of the improved carburetor shown in FIGS. 1 to 5, in conjunction with a gasoline engine, having a known type of manually operable accelerator means for controlling the speed of the engine, the accelerator (not shown) is operable through the rod 30 to enlarge the effective flow area or size of the venturi opening 22b, by sliding movement of the plate 18 in the guide slots 17 to the right from the position of the plate as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. This movement, in addition to enlarging the effective flow-area of the venturi opening 22b, also enlarges the flow-area of the gas-metering opening 24a in the adjusted gas supply tube 23, as well as exposing one or more additional holes 28 in the gas metering tube 24 for passage of additional gas from the supply tube into the path of the larger amount of air being sucked through the enlarged venturi opening 2211 as described above.

In use or operation of the improved carburetor, described above in particular reference to FIGS. 1 to 5, with a gas-operated, internal-combustion engine, air is in known manner sucked into the air-intake chamber 19, through the adjustably effective venturi opening 22b of slide-valve plate 18, and into the mixing chamber 20, to be thoroughly mixed with combustible gas globules or particles exuded or sucked from the aperture 28 at the discharge end 24 of tube 23 carried by the slidable plate 18. In other words, liquid gasoline is drawn into the air-intake chamber to be intimately mixed with the air rushing through the selectively adjusted venturi opening 22b as a relatively fine spray, generally in a ratio of about one part of gasoline by weight to fifteen parts of air, for example. The amounts and proportions of gasoline and air mixture which passes through the carburetor is, for the most part, variably controlled by an accelerator (not shown) which in turn adjusts the sliding movement of valve plate 18 carrying the gas tube 23 with it.

As the mixture leaves the carburetor 10, it is drawn into engine cylinder or cylinders (not shown), where it will be exploded by ignition means in known manner. It is known, however, that even the best available carburetors have not been capable of accomplishing complete atomization of the gas globules. In other words, the gas globules were not completely consumed upon ignition of the same in the engine cylinders at some, if not all, acceleration speeds of operation of the engine. Complete atomization is accomplished by the improved carburetor, at all acceleration speeds, by selectively proportioning of the amount of gas metered into the gas and air mixing chamber 20. With a small, slowspeed setting of venturi or throttling opening 22b, generally as shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, a carefully measured,

relatively small amount of gas is sucked from the end of the gas supply tube 23 by the proportionately effective amount of air sucked through the venturi opening. Accordingly, the amount of liquid gas sucked into the air passing through the gas and air mixing chamber 20 is so efficiently atomized that it can be accurately controlled by a preadjusted size of the venturi opening 22 b. That is, the self-adjusting nature of the gas and air mixing structure shown and described is such that maximum speed or acceleration rate of the engine is possible with a minimum of gas consumption, as well as with accomplishment of complete atomization of the ignited gas globules.

In use of the improved carburetor for some purposes, reduction of the air speed into the air and gas mixing chamber 20 may be desirable to save gas while attaining maximum power. To this end, and in reference to the modification shown in FIG. 6, which corresponds substantially to FIG. 4, the speed of the air passing through the venturi opening 22b in the slide-plate 18 may be reduced by diverting a proportionate amount of the air from entry into the mixing chamber 20. This diversion of air passing through the effective opening 22b may be accomplished automatically as by means of the modified form of slide plate 18 shown in FIG. 6, wherein plate 18 is provided with a series of holes 31, 31, extending in longitudinally spaced relation from at least one inner edge 22a of the plate 18, defining the adjustable size of the venturi opening. 22b, to a passage 32 connecting with a tube33 from a vacuum operated,

' accelerator controlled valve or motor 34 which,

. chambers, a slide-valve member, adjustably mounted through a suitable linkage (not shown) to the slidecontrol rod 30 (see FIG. 3), adjusts the size of said venturi opening as well as the amount of gas being mixed with air passing through the same. As an example, in operation of an engine at high speeds the carburetor can be self-operating, by the higher speeds of the air being sucked through the venturi opening 22b, correspondingly to reduce the size of the venturi opening and at the same time control the amount of gas fed through the same. It would be possible, for example, I

through variations in the number of openings 31 exposed in the effective venturi opening 22b, to calculate and provide appropriate spacing and sizes of the gas metering openings 28 in the metering tube 24, thereby to attain maximum economy of gas use at the high speeds which heretofore would have resulted in unburned gas with the use of the prior art carburetors.

Other modifications of the invention may be resorted to without departing from the spirit thereof or the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A carburetor as for a gasoline engine, comprising: a housing having connecting air-intake and gas-mixing between said chambers, and having a venturi-aperture means of variable flow area therethrough, for passage of air from said air-intake chamber to said gas-mixing chamber with correspondingly varying venturi effect on said air; means for adjusting said slide-valve member to vary the flow area of said venturi aperture means. and a gas metering device presented within said gasmixing chamber, for supplying gas to said gas-mixing chamber for convergence with said air passed through said venturi aperture means; said gas metering device said relatively fixed tube, to open and close one or more said gas metering holes to said gas mixing chamher, said gas supply tube having a gas outlet orifice in a free end thereof presented within said gas mixing chamber; and a tapered stem being affixed to said housing to extend into said gas supply tube through said outlet orifice to vary the effective gas flow area thereof in proportion to relative movement of the supply tube.

2. A carburetor as in claim 1, an air deflecting hood being provided above in said relatively fixed tube for dispersing the air passing through said venturi-aperture means, and uniformly around the fixed tube.

3. A carburetor as for a gasoline engine, comprising: a housing having connecting air-intake and gas-mixing chambers; a slide-valve member, adjustably mounted between said chambers, and having a venturi-aperture means of variable flow area therethrough for passage of air from said air-intake chamber to said gas-mixing chamber with correspondingly varying venturi effect on said air; means for adjusting said slide-valve member to vary the effective flow area of said venturi aperture means; and a gas metering device presented within said gas-mixing chamber, for supplying gas to said gasmixing chamber for convergence with said air passed through said venturi aperture means, said relatively movable parts including a relatively fixed tube having therein a plurality of gas metering holes, and a gas supply tube relatively movable with reference to said relatively fixed tube, to open and close one or more said holes to said gas mixing chamber, said'gas supply tube having a gas mixing chamber; and a tapered stem. being affixed to said housing to extend into said gas supply tube through said outlet orifice to vary the effective gas flow area thereof in proportion to relative movement of the supply tube.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2681216 *Apr 10, 1951Jun 15, 1954Henry KnechtSlotted jet carburetor
US2756033 *Nov 8, 1954Jul 24, 1956Amal LtdCarburettors for internal combustion engines
US3026095 *Nov 27, 1959Mar 20, 1962SparksCarburetor construction
US3086758 *Jun 29, 1961Apr 23, 1963Greene Robert AApparatus for carburetion
US3336014 *Feb 28, 1966Aug 15, 1967Rubery Owen & Company LtdFluid flow jets, particularly for carburetters
US3350073 *Nov 15, 1965Oct 31, 1967Hill Raymond RCarburetor
US3406952 *Dec 30, 1965Oct 22, 1968Gen Motors CorpCarburetor
US3424441 *Jun 5, 1967Jan 28, 1969Zenith Carburetter Co LtdAir valve lift control in carburetters
US3472495 *May 19, 1966Oct 14, 1969Ethyl CorpCarburetor nozzle
US3493217 *May 16, 1968Feb 3, 1970Farley John DashwoodCarburettors
US3709469 *Feb 2, 1970Jan 9, 1973W EdmonstonCarburetor
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8108995 *Sep 22, 2006Feb 7, 2012Jp Scope LlcValve apparatus for an internal combustion engine
US8516988Feb 3, 2012Aug 27, 2013Jp Scope, Inc.Valve apparatus for an internal combustion engine
US8899205Aug 26, 2013Dec 2, 2014Jp Scope, Inc.Valve apparatus for an internal combustion engine
US20070067988 *Sep 22, 2006Mar 29, 2007Price Charles EValve apparatus for an internal combustion engine
DE2701906A1 *Jan 19, 1977Jul 20, 1978Blakeway Ind LtdCarburettor with sliding throttle - uses throttle slide displacement to alter fuel flow cross=section
DE2703103A1 *Jan 26, 1977Aug 4, 1977Anders O AndreassenVergaser fuer brennkraftmaschinen mit gemeinsamer dosierung fuer den kraftstoff und die verbrennungsluft
DE3028852A1 *Jul 30, 1980Feb 25, 1982Dietrich StenderCarburettor for IC engine - has fuel inlet tube and air restricting plunger moving axially to vary flow characteristic
Classifications
U.S. Classification261/41.4, 261/50.1
International ClassificationF02B1/00, F02M9/06, F02M9/00, F02B1/04
Cooperative ClassificationF02M9/06, F02B1/04
European ClassificationF02M9/06