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Publication numberUS3855710 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 24, 1974
Filing dateJun 15, 1973
Priority dateJun 15, 1973
Publication numberUS 3855710 A, US 3855710A, US-A-3855710, US3855710 A, US3855710A
InventorsLunden J
Original AssigneeLunden J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Signal control device
US 3855710 A
Abstract
A signal control device which includes a sectional pole having a signal flare and signal flare firing mechanism mounted axially at the upper end thereof. A sighting mirror and centering level is mounted on the pole so as to be able to align the pole vertically and to sight along the path of the flare to determine if the flare veers from the vertical. A tripod support attachment is provided for the pole and may be used when desired. The flare is used in conjunction with a surveyor's transit to give accurate sightings at distant points where such sightings would otherwise be impossible due to the terrain, ground cover or the like.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Elrted States Patent 11 1 1 Lunden Dec. 24, 1974 {5 SIGNAL CONTROL DEVICE 3,570,130 3/1971 Boehm 33/295 [76] Inventor: 'k gg gg: l A 5 1532 5.? Primary ExaminerRichard E. Aegerter g Assistant Examiner-John W. Shepperd [22] Filed: June 15, 1973 Attorney, Agent, or FirmBerman, Bishoff & Platt 21 A l. N 370 307 l 1 pp 0 57 ABSTRACT A signal control device which includes a sectional pole [5%] U.S.CCll. ..33/29(5;,0l1021/g7d having a Signal flare and Signal flaw firing mechanism 2 gl 2:4/3 16. mounted axially at the upper end thereof. A sighting 1 0 can 3 293 mirror and centering level is mounted on the pole so as to be able to align the pole vertically and to sight along the path of the flare to determine if the flare [56] References cued veers from the vertical. A tripod support attachment is UNITED STATES PATENTS provided for the pole and may be used when desired. 1,976,264 10/1934 Miner et al. 33/293 The flare is used in conjunction with a surveyors tran- 2,245,901 6/ 1941 Chaskin 33/295 sit to give accurate sightings at distant points where lvdvessen 3 such sightings would otherwise be impossible due to ange 3,350,783 11/1967 Whitehead... 33/293 the terram ground cover or the 3,521,364 Metcalfe 33/293 8 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures SIGNAL CONTROL DEVICE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the Invention The present invention relates to signal control devices for providing a flare sight for aligning a surveyors transit.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention is a signal control device including an elongate sectional pole having a signal flare and signal flare firing device axially mounted on the upper end thereof. A sighting mirror and centering level is secured to the pole intermediate the upper and lower ends thereof for vertically aligning the pole and for obtaining a line of sight along the path of the flare so as to determine if the flare has veered out of the vertical after firing. A tripod attachment is provided for the pole for supporting the pole in its vertical position if desired.

The primary object of the invention is to provide a signal control device to produce an accurate flare signal for aligning a surveyors transit.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent from the following specification when considered in the light of the attached drawings:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a side elevation of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a vertical sectional view of the upper end of the sectional pole shown partially broken away for convenience of illustration.

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary side elevation of the signal flare and signal flare firing device on the upper end of the pole.

FIG. 4 is a horizontal sectional view taken along line 44 of FIG. 2 looking in the direction of the arrow.

FIG. 5 is a side elevation of the invention with tripod attachment secured thereto.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged horizontal sectional view taken along the line 6-6 of FIG. 5 looking in the direction of the arrows.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawings in detail wherein like reference characters indicate like parts throughout the several figures, the reference numeral 10 indicates generally a signal control device constructed in accordance with the invention.

The signal control device 10 includes a sectional pole 11 secured together by axial threaded studs 12. The sectional pole 11 can be dismounted for moving from place to place. A flare firing mechanism generally indicated at 13 is mounted axially on the upper end of the pole 11 and is detachably secured thereto by a threaded stud 12 as can be seen in FIG. 2.

A flare cartridge 14 is mounted axially on the upper end of the flare firing mechanism 13 and has a reduced diameter threaded neck 15 which is threaded into the upper end of the flare firing mechanism 13.

A firing pin 16 is mounted in the neck 15 and extends therebelow in the path of a vertically movable hammer 17 mounted in an axial bore 18 in the flare firing mechanism 13. An L-shaped slot 19 opens through the side of the flare firing mechanism 13 communicating with the bore 18 and a trigger pin 20 is connected to the hammer 17 and extends through the slot 19.

A coil spring 21 is positioned in the bore 18 against the lower end of the hammer 17 in a position to project the hammer l7 upwardly into contact with the firing pin 16 when the trigger pin 20 is moved in the L-shaped slot 19 toward the left as viewed in FIG. 3 so as to align with the long portion of the L-shaped slot 19. The flare cartridge 14 is conventional in structure and is sold as a unit and the complete cartridge 14 is removed and replaced with an unfired cartridge after each firing thereof.

A generally L-shaped bracket 22 is provided with an arcuate recess 23 for engagement with the side of the pole 11 as can be seen in FIGS. 2 and 4. The bracket 22 is detachably secured to the pole 11 by means of a U-bolt 24 which encompasses the pole 11 and pierces the vertical leg of the L-shaped bracket 22. Nuts 25 secure the U-bolt in clamping relation to the L-shaped bracket 22 and the pole 11.

The bracket 22 is provided with a flat shelf 26 which extends approximately ten degrees to the horizontal and has a mirror 27 secured thereto for sighting as described below.

A threaded bore 28 in the L-shaped bracket 22 is adapted to receive a circular centering level 29 to vertically align the pole 11.

On occasions the pole 1 1 must have support of a relatively rigid nature and a tripod generally indicated at 30 is provided for this purpose. The tripod 30 includes a generally U-shaped head 31 having a pair of spring locks 32 positioned on opposite sides of the open side of the U, so that the pole 11 can be clamped within the head 31 when the head 31 is snapped thereon. Three equispaced cars 33 are integrally formed on the head 31 with each ear 33 having a leg 34 pivotally secured thereto by a bolt 35 and wing nut 36.

The signal device of the instant invention permits a person to fire a flare vertically, with accuracy, for observation from a distant point and additionally allow the person firing the device to observe its progress vertically to note any deviation from vertical due to wind or other causes.

In the past surveying with flares has been largely based on the use of a shotgun with shotgun flares aligned with a rod level. This has not been reliable as the person operating the shotgun has not been able to observe the flare accurately on the vertical ascent and hence the accuracy of the observation cannot be determined.

Most surveying projects of any magnitude require that the surveyor establish ties of distance and bearing to section corners, state grids and other governmental monuments, also highway, utility and subdivision work requires many ties of distance and bearing to determine the physical location as well as the basis for material for needed material to build the projects.

Unfortunately, most of the control points are not intervisible being over hills and through wooded country. The signal device is becoming increasingly desirable as a surveyors working tool to eliminate the need of a surveyor to slash lines and occupy lands other than those associated with his project. This will also reduce labor costs since the work performed is reduced considerably.

In the use and operation of the present invention, the operator centers the base of the pole 11 over the point to be projected vertically and depending on accuracy desired, plumbs the pole 11 with or without the tripod 30 until the bubble is centered in circular level 29. With the flare cartridge 14 previously inserted and firing mechanism 13 cocked, the operator fires the flare and observes the circular level 29 and sighting mirror 27 as the flare ascends. Using the sighting mirror 27 the operator can observe the flare position using the pole 11 as the vertical axis. Should the flare, due to wind or other causes drift from vertical on its ascent, the operator can note the direction and magnitude and drift and relay this information to a distant observer by a radio or other signalling means.

It would be possible to use this device in windy conditions with skilled operators to hand hold the pole ll, leaning it into the wind and immediately upon firing plumb the pole 1 1 while facing the distant observer and note via radio when the flare was blown back to vertical position.

Having thus described the preferred embodiment of the invention, it should be understood that numerous structural adaptations may be resorted to without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A highly portable signal control device for use in surveying sightings, comprising an elongate pole having a bottom end for resting on a survey point, visible projectile firing means on the upper end of said pole for projecting a visible signal device upwardly in axial alignment with said pole, a bracket secured to said pole intermediate of its upper and lower ends and below the eye level of a surveyor holding the pole on a survey point, a level secured on said bracket for vertically aligning said pole, and a sighting mirror secured on said bracket at such angle as to enable a surveyor holding the pole on a survey point to sight along the path of the visible signal device when fired and to compare said path with the upper portion of said pole also visible in said mirror so as to observe deflections of the path of the signal device from the vertical.

2. A signal control device according to claim 1, wherein said visible signal device is a flare.

3. A device as claimed in claim 2 wherein said mirror is positioned at an angle of approximately ten degrees to the horizontal to assist in aligning with said flare path.

4. A device as claimed in claim 2 wherein the means for firing a flare is hand-actuated.

5. A device as claimed in claim 1 including a tripod detachably secured thereto for supporting said pole in vertical alignment.

6. A device as claimed in claim 5 wherein said tripod has a generally U-shaped head for engaging over said pole and a plurality of tripod legs pivotally secured to said head.

7. A device as claimed in claim 1 wherein said pole includes a plurality of detachable sections.

8. A signal control device according to claim 1,

wherein said level is a circular level.

l l I

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1976264 *Nov 13, 1929Oct 9, 1934Charles D HyattSectional range pole
US2245901 *Sep 26, 1939Jun 17, 1941Harold ChaskinMounting for surveyor's targets
US2433313 *Aug 30, 1945Dec 23, 1947Anselm Wessen GeorgDrawing instrument
US3167864 *Sep 19, 1961Feb 2, 1965Lange Edward HSpirit level
US3350783 *Feb 4, 1965Nov 7, 1967Leigh Whitehead AlbertMethod of surveying and device for use in connection therewith
US3521364 *Jan 30, 1968Jul 21, 1970Herbert A MetcalfeSighting square
US3570130 *Dec 4, 1968Mar 16, 1971Boehm SheldonHolding device for surveying instruments
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4803745 *Jun 25, 1987Feb 14, 1989Agustin IzquierdoSurvival knife sheath
US4879816 *Oct 24, 1988Nov 14, 1989Sierk Anthony HCombination range pole and bubble-level therefor
US5567907 *Aug 22, 1994Oct 22, 1996Westfall; Thomas C.Fireworks support apparatus
US7048241Apr 18, 2003May 23, 2006Crain Enterprises, Inc.Geomatic support having hinged legs with hinge lock
US7124985Apr 18, 2003Oct 24, 2006Crain Enterprises, Inc.Geomatic pole support with telescoping legs and locks
US7207534Apr 18, 2003Apr 24, 2007Crain Enterprises, Inc.Geomatic pole support and foot therefor
US7222827Apr 18, 2003May 29, 2007Crain Enterprises, Inc.Telescoping leg lock with thumb actuator
US7240881Jan 17, 2006Jul 10, 2007Crain Enterprises, Inc.Geomatic support having hinged legs with hinge lock
US7374140Jun 1, 2006May 20, 2008Crain Enterprises, Inc.Geomatic pole support with telescoping legs and locks
US7465086 *Mar 6, 2006Dec 16, 2008Foreman Instrumentation & Controls, Inc.Adjustable length thermowell
US7631842Apr 18, 2003Dec 15, 2009Seco Manufacturing Company, Inc.Modular geomatic pole support system
US7669813 *Jan 10, 2005Mar 2, 2010Seco Manufacturing Company, Inc.Multiple function geomatics pole support device
Classifications
U.S. Classification33/295, 102/358, 102/343
International ClassificationG01C15/06, G01C15/02
Cooperative ClassificationG01C15/06
European ClassificationG01C15/06