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Publication numberUS3855740 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 24, 1974
Filing dateFeb 14, 1973
Priority dateFeb 19, 1972
Also published asDE2307950A1, DE2307950B2
Publication numberUS 3855740 A, US 3855740A, US-A-3855740, US3855740 A, US3855740A
InventorsKobayashi H
Original AssigneeTipton Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Centrifugal barrel finishing apparatus having tiltable tubs
US 3855740 A
Abstract
This invention relates to a centrifugal barrel finishing apparatus having tiltable tubs, the apparatus including a means for moving the covers for tubs up and down, a means for tilting all tubs to an angle to allow an automatic discharge of the finished workpieces and abrasive media, a means for charging a given quantity of mass including workpieces and abrasive media and a means for separating the mass into workpieces and media, so that all these operations are automatically performed in an improved manner.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Kohayashi Dec. 24, 1974 [54] CENTRIFUGAL BARREL FINISHING 2,822,127 2/1958 Sinn 233/25 X APPARATUS HAVING THLTABLE TUBS 2,923,104 2/1960 Olson 51/164 [75] Inventor: Hisamine Kobayashi, Nagoya, Japan FOREIGN P TE S OR APPLICATIONS l i 1 5 Nagoya City, Aichi Pref., Japan I Primary Examiner-l-larold D. Wh1tehead [22] Flled: 1973 Attorney, Agent, or FirmWenderoth, Lind & Ponack [21] Appl. No.: 332,378

[57] ABSTRACT [30] Foreign Application Priority Data This invention relates to a centrifugal barrel finishing Feb. 19, 1972 Japan 47-17340 apparatus having 1111111316 tubs the apparatus including a means for moving the covers for tubs up and down, [52 us. c1. 51/164, 233/25 a means for tilting all tubs to an angle to allow an 51] 1111. C1. 1324b 31/04 tomatic discharge of the finished workpieces and abra- [58] Field of Search 134/79, s0, 81, 121; sive media, a means for charging a given q y of 51/164; 259/48; 241/171, 176; 233/25 mass including workpieces and abrasive media and a means for separating the mass into workpieces and 5 References Cited media, so that all these operations are automatically UNITED STATES PATENTS performed in an improved manner. 895,173 8/1908 Ecaulbert 51/164 UX 12 Claims, 16 Drawing Figures PATENTED 95324!!! SHEET 010F12 ww m POE PATENTEDUEBZMW 3,855,740

SHEET 03 0F 12 34a 20a 35a 37a PATENTED 3,855,7O

' sum user 12 FATENTEBUECZdIHT i 3,855,740

sum mar 12 FIGS SHEET DSUF 12 FIGH 'PATENTEUDEBZMBH 7,855,740

SHEET IOUF 12 l s I y g l-{ll H9 alga Mlllllli! HM BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a centrifugal barrel finishing apparatus with tiltable tubs having covers automatically moved up and down, said tubs being automatically tilted simultaneously or separately to discharge the mass with an improved efficiency, and having a means for separating the mass into workpieces and media and a means for charging a given quantity of mass into the tubs.

All types of conventional apparatus have a number of tubs rotatably mounted on a pair of turrets rotating at high speeds to cause the tubs to revolve. The masses in the rotating tubs are processed with a good efficiency, receiving several or some times as great centrifugal force as the gravity which would normally act thereon. However, this presents a problem as to the manual labor and time consumption in the operations for charging and discharging the mass.

In order to solve this problem, some automated operations have been performed In an apparatus disclosed in prior US. application Ser. No. 231,874, filed Mar. 6, 1972, the operations such as movement of tub covers, tilting and returning of tubs and charging of mass are automated but performed on a one-tub at a time basis, and when these operations have been completed for one tub, the turret is caused to rotate by a given angle to place a second tub in the position for discharging and charging the mass. This has really reduced the manual labor, but there is still a problem in saving time.

In this invention, a splined shaft is used as a means of connecting the tub to the driving system. In this way, when the tub is caused to turn toward the mass discharging side, then it is brought out of engagement with the driving system by means of the splined shaft, and is brought into engagement with the same on turning to its upright position. This simplifies the structure of the apparatus, thus increasing the working capacity of all tubs.

Furthermore, it provides advantages over all prior apparatus in that tub covers are moved up and down simultaneously and tubs can be caused to tilt simultaneously or separately in charging and discharging the mass.

Conventional vibratory separating means are usually installed in a straight line so as to transport the mass to a separating apparatus, and the mass discharging operations are performed when tubs are stopped in a given position.

However, this invention provides an annular transport and separating means enabling the mass discharging operations to be performed with all tubs simultaneously.

There are two methods of weighing the mass to be finished, one being that workpieces and abrasive media are automatically weighed, and the other being that a weighing instrument is used to charge a given quantity of mass. These methods present disadvantages in that sophisticated instruments must be used and workpieces must previously be weighed in a block, thus causing workpieces to get damaged when during or after weighmg.

In this invention, workpieces and media are alternately charged bit by bit into the tubs so that there occur no such damages.

Feeding of the mass is by the use of an annular feeding means, by which it is possible to feed mass into the tubs simultaneously.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION According to the invention, the lower turret is provided with a pulley connected by way of a chain or belt to the main drive motor, and the upper turret is placed at a given interval above the lower turret, said lower and upper turrets being fixed on the main shaft. Both ends of the main shaft are rotatably supported on lower and upper bearings fixed on the upper and lower frames, the lower end of said main shaft having a sprocket wheel or pulley freely supported and fixed on the lower bearings.

The main shaft and the turrets are fixed by the use of a key or the like. The same number of bearings as tubs are mounted across the upper and lower turrets. The lower shaft is rotatably supported on the bearing of the lower turret, the lower end of said shaft having a sprocket wheel or pulley across that of the main shaft and driven by chains or belts. In this way, the axial rotation of the lower shaft is caused by the orbital revolution of the lower turret. The upper end of the lower shaft is axially splined to provide a curved profile. Supporting arms are fixed on the lower turret, said supporting arms being rotatably supported on bearings, and the shafts for tubs are rotatably supported on said bearings.

The lower end of the tub shaft is also splined to provide a concave profile which is capable of joining or separating from the corresponding upper end of the lower shaft and is provided with a driving system to tilt the tubs in the supporting arms. The bottom of the upper turret has covers for the tubs rotatably mounted across the tubs, and is provided with a means for moving the upper turret up and down in relation to the lower turret.

With the apparatus of the invention, the upper turret is moved upwardly and the rotation of the supporting arms is caused by the driving system, and a tub is caused to tilt on its shaft to discharge mass automatically. When the tub turns in the opposite direction toward its upright position, a charge of mass with unfinished workpieces is automatically fed into it.

In this invention, one annular transport and separating means is used to separate the mass discharged from all tubs simultaneously. By this means, it is possible, on the one hand, to recharge the separated media into tubs while selecting the finished workpieces, on the other. An annular mass feeding means is also used to feed mass into all tubs simultaneously or separately. Weighing of workpieces and media is made by the use of a water gauge which measures water levels produced by workpieces and media thrown into water. A given quantity of mass is thus measured and fed into the tubs BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE ACCOMPANYING DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a front view, partly in section, of one portion of the finishing apparatus of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a partial plan view of the apparatus of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a plan view of a driving system for tilting every tub two at a time.

FIG. 4 is a plan view of a driving system for tilting tubs one by one.

FIG. 5 is a front view of a mass weighing instrument.

FIG. 6 is a plan view of the instrument of FIG. 5, taken along the line BB of FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a water gauge and a circuit diagram thereof.

FIG. 8 is another water gauge and the circuit diagram thereof.

FIG. 9 is a plan view of the gauge of FIG. 8.

FIG. 10 is a plan view of a mass feeding equipment.

FIG. 11 is an enlarged sectional view of the equipment of FIG. 10 taken along the line CC of FIG. 10.

FIG. 12 is an enlarged sectional view of the equipment of FIG. 10 taken along the line DC of FIG. 10.

FIG. 13 is a plan view of a mass transport and separating apparatus.

FIG. 14 is a side view of the apparatus of FIG. 13.

FIG. 15 is an enlarged sectional view of a portion of the apparatus of FIG. 13.

FIG. 16 is an enlarged side view of the apparatus of FIG. 13.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION The finishing apparatus of the invention is provided with tiltable tubs axially rotating during the orbital revolution of the turrets, incorporating a means for moving the covers for tubs up and down and a means for tilting tubs to such an angle as to allow an automatic discharge of mass. With this apparatus having this simple construction, it is possible to carry out automatic mass charging and discharging operations without any decrease of the working capacity of the tubs. Labor saving and higher finishing efficiency have thus been realized.

Now, the finishing apparatus of the invention will be further described, by way of examples only, by reference to the accompanying drawings.

In FIGS. 1 and 2, a lower turret 1 is provided having integral therewith a pulley 1a which connects by way of a belt or chain to a high speed main motor (not shown in the figure). The the motor must be capable of being operated at two velocities, i.e., finishing and inching. An upper turret 2 is positioned above the lower turret 1. A main shaft 6 is passed through the lower and upper turrets 1 and 2. The lower part of the main shaft 6 is rotatably supported on a lower bearing 11 which is mounted on the lower part of a housing 12. The same number of sprocket wheels or pulleys 7, 7a, 7b, 7c as there are tubs, or one half the number thereof, are fixed on the bearing 11, rotating with the main shaft 6. An example of one half number is shown in the figure.

The upper end of the main shaft 6 is rotatably supported on an upper bearing 13 which is fixed on the upper part of the housing 12. The main shaft 6 and the turret 1 are fixed to each other by means of a key or the like. The same number of bearings as tubs are mounted around the upper and lower turrets, respectively. The number of tubs is arbitrary, and a finishing apparatus having four tubs, for example, will be described hereinafter.

Four bearings 8, 8a, 8b, 8c are mounted on the lower turret 1 to pennit rotation of the lower shafts 3, 3a, 3b, 30 therein respectively. Sprocket wheels or pulleys 5, 5a, 5b, 5c are mounted on the lower ends of the respective lower shafts 3, 3a, 3b, 30, being connected by way of the chains or belts to the corresponding sprocket wheels or pulleys 7, 7a. The upper ends of the lower shafts 3, 3a, 3b, 3c are axially splined and are in the shape of a truncated cone. The tub shafts 17, 17a, 17b, 17c are mounted on the lower ends of the respective tubs 18, 18a, 18b, 180, the lower ends of said shafts each having a splined truncated conical recess therein which engages with the splined upper end of the corresponding lower shafts 3, 3a, 3b, 36. Supporting arms 23, 23a, 23b, 23c are fixed on the lower turret l by, the respective arms of a bolt or by welding means, having shafts 16, 16a, 16b, 16c rotatably mounted on the upper end thereof to allow bearing mounts 10, 10a, 10b, 10c to rotate with the shafts. The bearing mounts 10, 10a, 10b, have ball bearings 24, 24a, 24b, 240 at the center thereof, said ball bearings supporting the tub shafts 17, 17a, 17b, 17c on the inner race thereof.

The shafts 16, 16a, 16b, 16c have worm wheels 19, 19a, 19b, 19c fixed at one end thereof, said worm wheels engaging with worm screws 20, 20a, 20b, 200. The shafts 25, 25a, 25b, 25c, of the worm screws extend through the lower turret 1. Sprocket wheels 35, 35a, 35b, 350 are mounted on the lower part of the lower turret 1.

The truncated conical ends of the splined shafts 3, 3a, 3b, 3c are so fonned as to bring tubs into engagement or out of engagement with the driving system when tubs are tilting or returning around the shafts 24.

The tubs 18, 18a, 18b, have an opening at the top, having a cylindrical, polygonal or any other shape. For polishing purposes in particular, a pentagonal or octagonal tub is more convenient since it, when it orbital motion, causes a flow layer on the surface of the mass.

The tubs have flanges 14, 14a, 14b, 14c around the opening, said flanges having packings 15, 15a, 15b, 15c thereon. Tub covers 21, 21a, 21b, 210 are so mounted as to be placed on the flanges when the tubs are upright. The covers are also provided with packings 22, 22a, 22b, 220 on the lower surfaces thereof, which keep the tubs sealed in cooperation with the flange packings. The upper shafts 4, 4a, 4b, 4c are mounted on the top of the covers, and are rotatably supported on the upper bearings 9, 9a, 9b, 90 which are fixed on the upper turret 2.

An outer race 28 for the upper turret is fixed by welding means or the like on a portion through which the main shaft for the turret 2 is passed. The mounting of the outer race 28 is means of of a spherical thrust roller bearing as shown in the figure so that the outer race 28 can be rotated relative to a slider 26 for moving tub covers and can be slid along the main shaft 6 with the slider 26. The slider 26 is so mounted as to rotate and slide relative to the main shaft 6.

The slider 26 has two or four arms 27, 27a, 27b, 27c at the top (four arms being shown), the free ends of said arms being connected by means of pins 29, 29a, 29b, 29c to the heads of the piston rods 31, 31a, 31b,

31c of cylinders 30, 30a, 30b, 300 for moving the tub covers. The cylinders which are mounted on the housing 12 are operated by a hydraulic or pneumatic means.

The lower turret 1 is provided with another bearing 32 on which a shaft is rotatably supported which has a pinion 33 at the lower end. The shaft has a sprocket wheel 34 fixed centrally thereof. The sprocket wheel 34 is placed on a level with the worm wheels 25, 25a, 25b, 25c and is connected by way of a chain 37 to the intermediate sprocket wheels 36, 36a, 36b, 360 as shown in FIG. 2.

In FIG. 2, one pinion 33 drives the worm shafts 25, 25a, 25b, 25c to rotate them simultaneously. In FIG. 3, two pinions are provided so that one pinion 33 may impart its rotation to the worm shafts 20, 20c whereas the other pinion 33 rotates the worm shafts 20a, 20b. In FIG. 4, four pinions 33 are provided near the worm shafts 20, 20a, 20b, 20c so as to impart their respective rotation thereto.

A supporting arm 38 for a driving system is mounted on the bottom of the housing 12 as shown in FIG. 2, said arm 38 having a supporting arm 40 rotatably mounted on a shaft 39 thereon. The supporting arm 40 has a rotatable pinion 42 at the free end, oscillating as indicated by an arrow 41 under hydraulic or pneumatic pressure. In the position as shown in FIG. 2 the pinions 33 and 42 are brought into engagement. When the pinions 33 and 42 are moved out of engagement, the lower turret 1 can rotate independently of the pinion 42.

The pinion 42 has a driving system, in which a drive motor, such as an electric motor 43 drives a pulley 45 to rotate it through of reduction gears 44, said pulley 45 and a pulley connected to the shaft 39 than imparting rotation to the pinion 42 by way of a belt or chain.

In order to detect positions where tubs are placed, holes 47 and 48 for detecting by photocell are provided at a right angle to the drawing. A projector and a photoelectric switch are mounted on the housing 12. In this way, it is possible to detect the position where tubs are to be stopped.

By this structure of the apparatus as described above, when the lower turret 1 begins to rotate, it causes the main shaft 6 to rotate, and then the tubs are also caused to revolve in an orbital motion around the main shaft 6. At this moment, the main shaft 6 is rotating inside the slider 26 while the cylinder 30 for moving tub covers, the slider 26 and supporting arm 27 remain station ary. The outer race 28 is rotating about the bearing with the orbital motion of the tub 18 and the axial rotation of the turret 2 while the slider 26 remains stationary.

A chute 49 and an annular separating means 50 are provided for the tubs, said separating means 50 surrounding the lower turret 1.

The axial rotation of the tubs 18, 18a, 18b, 180 is caused by the sprocket wheels or pulleys 7, 7a and lower shafts 3, 3a, 3b, 30 which are interconnected by the chain or belt. The lower shafts 3, 3a, 3b, 3c are rotating inside the lower bearings 8, 8a, 8b, 8c and the shafts 17, 17a, 17b, 17c are rotating inside the bearings 10, a, 10b, 10c by means of the splined shafts provided on the upper end of the lower shaft. The upper shafts 4, 4a, 4b, 4c are rotating inside the upper bearings 9, 9a, 9b, 90 while the tub covers 21, 21a, 21b, 21c remain stationary on the tubs 17, 17a, 17b, 17c.

Now, the operations of the finishing apparatus will be explained by referring to the structure described heretofore.

After a predetermined finishing period of time, a timer works to switch the motor to turn slowly, then moving the turret to the tub tilting position. There are two methods of stopping the turret in position; one is that a cutout is provided around the lower turret 1 so that a roller is thereby locked; and the other is that as shown in FIG. 1, a through hole 48 is provided on the upper turret 2 through which a beam of light is passed at a right angle to the drawing when a tub cover is placed in an open or closed position, and a photoelectric switch acts to stop the motor when the turret is placed correctly in a predetermined position. When the turret has stopped, a valve is operated automatically by signal or manually to introduce pneumatic air or hydraulic oil into the piston rod sides of the cylinders 30, a, 30b, 300, so that tub covers move upwardly as the piston rods moving up to the position as shown in FIG. 1.

Movement of the lever at this moment brings the pinions 33 and 42 into engagement. When the motor 43 is then started, it causes the chain to move, followed by rotation of the sprocket wheels 35, 35a, 35b, 350 which cause the worm wheels 19, 19a, 19b, 190 to rotate by way of the worm screws 25, 25a, 25b, 250. With worm wheel shafts 16, 16a, 16b, 16c and the bearings 10, 10a, 10b, 10c firmly connected, the bearings are rotated clockwise in the case of the righthand tub in FIG. 1, so that the splined shafts are disconnected and the tub is caused to tilt toward a position 18-2. When the tub turns downwards. the mass is discharged out of the tub. This position can be detected by a light switch LS provided on the chute 49, and the motor 43 is then stopped by a relay and caused to turn reversely. All tubs can be caused to tilt simultaneously or separately. The mass is dis charged through the chute 49 into the annular separating means where the mass separation is performed.

When it is necessary to feed a given quantity of workpieces to be finished during reversal of the motor, the motor may be stopped when the tub reaches the position 18-1.

When feeding of the charge is completed, the motor is started again to bring the tub to its upright position and join the upper and lower splined shafts. This upright position can be detected by the use of the photocell. If a beam of light extending at a right angle to the drawing passes through both holes 46, 48 in FIG. 1, it means that the tub has been placed correctly in its upright position.

There has been described the situation in which all four tubs are tilting simultaneously. FIG. 3 shows a -drive system for tilting two tubs at a time. For tilting two tubs at a time, two pinions 33 and associated parts such as worm shafts 20 and 200, 20a and 20b, and chains 37 and 37a etc. are provided so that tubs 18, are first caused to tilt and tubs 18a, 18b are then caused to tilt.

For tilting each tub separately, four pinions 33, are provided near the corresponding worm shafts 20, 20a, 20b, 2110 as indicated in FIG. 4, so that tubs may be caused to tilt one by one to exchange the mass.

The embodiments of FIGS. 3 and 4 have advantages when one tub is so large that the separating apparatus is not sufficient to receive at one time the mass from all tubs. In either case, on completion of the discharging and charging operations and with the tubs in upright positions, a signal is sent out to remove air pressure from the piston rod side of the cylinders 30 and boost air pressure in the piston side (upper side) so that the covers 21-210 are moved downwardly to seal the tubs. Whether or not the tubs have been securely sealed can be detected by the limit switch LS which is installed on the end of one piston rod 31, said limit switch LS if the tub has been sealed correctly, sending out a signal to act on a relay which drives the main motor to rotate the tubs. Other subsequent operations are performed in the same manner as described earlier.

Weighing and preparing of mass is automatically carried out by the measuring instrument of FIG. 5. A chute 51 is provided inside a housing (not shown) above the tubs. An opening 52 of the chute 51 comes opposite the opening of a tub 18 when the tub is ready to receive a mass. There is a mass measuring box 53 inside the chute 51, in which a given amount of mass is stored. This box 53 has shafts 54 and 54a rotatably supported on bearings 55 and 55a on the chute 51. The shaft 54 has a pinion 56 at the end, said pinion 56 engaging with a rack 57 both ends of which are rotatably supported on bearings 58 and 58a on the chute 51. The rack 57 has a crank 59 on the lower side, said crank 57 being connected to one end of the piston rod 61 of the cylinder 60. The cylinder 60 is fixed on the chute 51. A mass measuring pipe 62 which is placed near the box 52 is 65 to the housing. A connector 65 at the lower end of the pipe 62 and a connector 66 at the lower end of the box 52 are inter-connected by means of a rubber or vinyl hose 64. The upper end of the connector 66 is covered with a metallic net 67 which prevents abrasive media or other solid substances from entering the hose 64. The connector 66 may be placed in any position of the lower end of the pipe 62, but should preferably be placed in such a position as to minimize the strains on the hose 64, when the box 53 is turning toward a position 53a in which case the hose is shown in position 64a.

A water gauge is provided inside the pipe 62. This gauge may be a float type having contacts or an electric-contact type as indicated in FIG. 7.

When an electric-contact type is used, an electrically insulated cover 63 is provided on the pipe 62, having contacts A A A Intervals of the level of the bottom ends these contacts make possible the mass measuring, which will be described hereinafter.

Instead of the measuring pipe 62, a measuring instrument may be provided at one comer of the measuring box which is separated by a metallic net 68 as shown in FIG. 8. In this instance, an electrically insulated cover 63a is provided with a sleeve 69 sliding on the shaft 71 supported on the bearings 70 and 70a in the housing.

The outer race 69 is provided with a wire 72 which, with the aid of the cylinder 73, pulls the water gauge back to a position in which turning of the measuring box is not obstructed by the gauge.

Now, the functions of the contacts A A A will be explained, as follows.

A given voltage is applied between A and A A and A respectively, where A is a base contact, as indicated in FIG. 7.

No electric current flows between these contacts when water is not present in the measuring box. When water is present, for example, to a level A, electric current flows between A and A, to operate a relay circuit CR A given amount of workpieces or abrasive media being fed into the box, the water level rises and the water gauge measures the cubic volume of the mass accordingly.

A desired quantity of workpieces or media can be determined and charged in a predetermined sequence by the use of a signal from the measuring box.

A mass feeding means is provided on top of the measuring box. This means is mounted on the housing or another frame, feeding workpieces to one portion of a tub and abrasive media to the other portion.

At the bottom of the tub, there are covers 76 and 76a rotating about the shafts 77 and 77a and said covers 76, 76a having piston rods 78 and 78a of cylinders 79 and 79a rotatably connected to the lateral side thereof.

Now, the functions of the measuring instrument will be described. When the measuring box 53 returns to its upright position after discharging a mass, the crank 59 acts on the limit switch LS to actuate it, and then a relay functions to feed desired quantities of water and compound solution into the box 53. A known float valve distributor may be used or an electromagnetic valve may be used for this purpose. In the latter instance, the limit switch LS acts on the relay to open the electromagnetic valve, and when the water gauge indicates a certain level of water, i.e., when an electric current flows between A and A the relay CR, functions to close the valve.

When feeding of water has been completed, the timer or the relay CR works to apply air pressure into one side of the cylinder 79 or 79a to open the cover 76 or 76a and feed workpieces or media.

When workpieces or media are fed into the measuring box, the water level rises and the contacts A A form a circuit as predetermined to act on the relay CR to introduce air pressure to the other side of the cylinder, then closing the cover and stopping the mass feedmg.

When the cover is closed, the limit switch LS or LS operates to open the other cover. In this manner, desired quantities of workpieces and media are fed into the measuring box 53. Workpieces and media may be fed separately. However, it is rather desirable that workpieces alone should not be fed in order to prevent damage due to impact thereof. Feeding of both workpieces and mass simultaneously is possible in various methods by controlling the electric circuit. One

method, for example, is that the covers 76 and 76a are opened simultaneously, the opening being regulated by strokes of the piston rods 78 and 78a beforehand to control the ratio of workpieces and media to be fed and to close the covers when a desired water level is reached. A second method is that both covers 76 and 76a are kept open till the relay CR starts, and one of the covers (usually the cover for workpieces) is closed when the relay CR functions while the other remains open to feed the mass till the relay CR starts to function.

A third is that workpieces and media are alternately fed bit by bit into the measuring box.

Whatever method may be chosen, given quantities of workpieces and media are kept in store in the measuring box 53. Compound solution may be fed into the box through the feeding unit or in solid form or directly fed into tubs.

When the tub stops to discharge mass, and is caused to tilt back to a position 18-1, pneumatic pressure is introduced into one side of the cylinder 60, then the rack 57 and the pinion 56 cause the measuring box to turn toward the position 53a in FIG. 5. From this position 53a, a given quantity of mass is fed through the chute 51 and its opening 53 into the tub 18-1.

In a given period of time after the box has taken the position 53a, the timer starts to function so as to introduce air pressure into the other side of the cylinder 60 and return the box to its original position. Other operations will follow in the same manner as described earlier.

The instrument of FIG. discussed previously is used to feed mass into all tubs from one position, but it is possible to feed mass into all tubs simultaneously by using annular feeding equipment which will now be described.

In FIG. 10, separate arch-like portions 82, 83, 84 and 85 having a rectangular or semi-circular section are combined into one circular or elliptic shape trough. These portions are joined by rubber or plastic joints 86, 87, 88 and 89, each portion vibrating separately. This equipment may be built as one circular or elliptic trough.

In the embodiment of FIG. 10, a double circular path is provided, one for workpieces and the other for abrasive media. This equipment may be used for feeding media alone, whereas workpieces may be fed through other feeding means. The lateral side of the trough is provided with vibration-generating motors 9t), 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96 and 97 which cause the trough to vibrate and circulate mass therealong.

In FIG. 12, this trough is resiliently mounted by springs 98 and 99 on a base 100, and firmly supported on connecting rods 101 and 102. The connecting rods 101 and 102 are provided with a hard rubber bushing 103 and 104 and a rubber cushion 105 and 106 absorbing shocks to the trough.

There are hoppers 107, 108, 109 and 110 over tubs as shown in FIG. 11. The hoppers have openings at the bottom which are provided with covers 111 and 112. The covers 111 and 112 are connected by way of links 113 and 114 to piston rods 117 and 118 of cylinders 115 and 116, turning with movement of the piston rods 117 and 118.

When tubs are ready to receive a mass, air pressure is introduced into the piston rod side of the cylinders 115 and 116 to move the covers to open them. Then workpieces and media are fed into the mass feeding apparatus, where workpieces and media are measured to desired quantities as described earlier, and fed into tubs. In this instance, when a definite volume of workpieces and media is fed into the mass feeding apparatus, a detecting device sends out a signal to introduce air pressure into the cylinders and move the covers to close them.

Now, the mass transport and separating equipment will be described by referring to the drawings.

In FIGS. 13 and 14, 121, 122, 123 and 124 are vibratory feeders having a rectangular section, for example, particulars of which are shown in FIG. 15.

The feeders are resiliently mounted by way of lateral plates 125, 125 and springs 126, 126 on a base 142.

The inner wall of the feeder should be preferably covered with rubber material so as to prevent workpieces from being damaged. The feeders 121, 122, 123

and 124 are joined by rubber joints 127, 128 and 129, each feeder vibrating independently of the others.

Vibration generating motors 130, 131 and 132 are provided, each causing the feeders to vibrate separately to transport a mixture of mass to a screen 133.

Chutes 134, 135, 136 and 137 are provided to transport the discharged mass to the vibratory feeders. One feeder 124 is connected to the screen 133. The screen 133 is caused to vibrate by a pair of motors 138 and 139, separating the mass into workpieces and media. Workpieces are ejected through a port 140 whereas media are ejected through a port 141.

This mass transport and separating equipment, by using an annular vibratory equipment, permits an automatic and simultaneous screening of the mass discharged from all tubs, particularly those of a vertical centrifugal barrel finishing apparatus. It thus reduces the manual labor, time and working area to a considerable extent. In the embodiment just described, the mass transporting path is divided into four sections, but this division is arbitrary. This path may be built in a single section. The vibration-generating motors may be placed centrally of the equipment.

Having thus been described, this invention provides a number of advantages, such as saving manual labor and time as well as economizing the working capacity of tubs.

In summary, this invention is characterized in that, in a centrifugal barrel finishing apparatus having a plurality of tubs, tubs are capable of tilting by means of the splined shafts. It is also characterized in that covers for tubs are moved up and down simultaneously, tilting or returning of tubs is performed simultaneously or separately, i.e., two tubs at a time or one by one, and feeding of mass is performed to all tubs simultaneously. In addition, the annular feeding equipment and the automatic measuring instrument permit an automatic operation for feeding mass and a simplified operation for recharging used media into tubs. The annular transport and separating equipment permits an automatic operation for opening all covers simultaneously and separat ing the finished workpieces and media.

These operations that have been described may be sequence-programmed or performed with handoperated switches. These two methods are naturally within the technical scope of the present invention.

What is claimed:

1. A centrifugal barrel finishing apparatus comprising a lower turret rotatably mounted for rotation around a central axis, a plurality of tubs rotatably mounted on said lower turret around said central axis and rotatable around axes parallel to said central axis, drive means coupled to said lower turret for rotating said lower turret, tub drive means detachable coupled to said tubs for rotating said tubs, said tubs being pivotally mounted on said lower turret for pivotal movement outwardly of said central axis to a position in which the axes of the tubs are at more than to the central axis, tubpivoting means coupled to said tubs, an upper turret mounted above said lower turret and movable toward and away from said lower turret, tub covers on said upper turret in positions corresponding to the positions of said tubs on said lower turret and engageable with said tubs to close said tubs when said upper turret is moved toward said lower turret, and upper turret drive means coupled to said upper turret for moving said upper turret toward and away from said lower turret.

2. A centrifugal barrel finishing apparatus as claimed in claim 1 in which said tub pivoting means comprises means coupled to the tubs for pivoting at least two of the tubs simultaneously.

3. A centrifugal barrel finishing apparatus as claimed in claim 1 in which said tub pivoting means comprises means coupled to the tubs for pivoting the tubs separately one at a time.

4. A centrifugal barrel finishing apparatus as claimed in claim 1 in which said tubs each have a tub shaft on which the tub is mounted, said lower turret having a plurality of tub drive shafts thereon, one for each tub, one shaft in each pair of a tub shaft and tub drive shaft having a splined portion on the end thereof toward the other shaft, and the other shaft having a splined recess in the end thereof toward the one shaft for receiving the splined portion on the end of the one shaft, whereby when a tub is pivoted, the splined portion moves freely out of and back into the recess for disconnecting the tub from the tub drive means.

5. A centrifugal barrel finishing apparatus as claimed in claim 1 in which said tubs each have a tub shaft on which the tub is mounted, a bearing in which said shaft is rotatably mounted and a pivotal mounting on said lower turret on which said bearing is pivotally mounted for pivoting movement of said tub on said lower turret.

6. A centrifugal barrel finishing apparatus as claimed in claim 1 in which said upper turret drive means comprises fluid pressure drive means.

7. A centrifugal barrel finishing apparatus as claimed in claim 1 further comprising position detecting means operatively associated with said tubs for detecting the position to which said tubs have been pivoted.

8. A centrifugal barrel finishing apparatus as claimed in claim 1 further comprising at least one feeding means positioned around the periphery of said turrets for feeding parts to be finished and a polishing media into a tub stopped at the position of the feeding means.

9. A centrifugal barrel finishing apparatus as claimed in claim 8 in which said feeding means is an annular trough extending around the turrets and having feeding chutes extending downwardly therefrom toward the tubs and at positions corresponding to the positions of the tubs on said lower turret when said turrets are stopped, hoppers above said annular trough for feeding parts and abrasive media into said trough, and vibration generating means associated with said trough for vibrating the media and the parts in said trough.

10. A centrifugal barrel finishing apparatus as claimed in claim 9 in which said trough is divided into two annular portions, one for polishing media and one for parts.

11. A centrifugal barrel finishing apparatus as claimed in claim 8 in which said feeding means comprises means for preparing a quantity of compound solution, finishing media and parts to be finished, a measuring box into which said quantity is fed, and liquid level measuring means in said measuring box for measuring the amount of the mixture fed into the box and discontinuing the feed when a predetermined amount has been fed.

12. A centrifugal barrel finishing apparatus as claimed in claim 1 further comprising an annular transporting and separating means around said lower turret having a trough extending in an annular path and having an end lying adjacent the annular path, a plurality of chutes spaced therearound at intervals corresponding to the spacing of the tubs around the turrets so that when the tubs are pivoted they discharge the contents into said chutes, vibrating means operatively associated with said annular transporting and separating means for transporting the contents of the tubs therealong toward said end, and a screening means at said end of the annular transporting and separating means for separating the media and the parts.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4073095 *Jan 17, 1977Feb 14, 1978Manfrid DreherCentrifugal drum polishing machine
US4104831 *Aug 1, 1977Aug 8, 1978Kabushiki Kaisha Shikishima TiptonAutomatic centrifugal barrel finishing machine
US4505072 *Sep 8, 1983Mar 19, 1985Shikishima Tipton Manufacturing Co., Ltd.Centrifugal rotary barrel-type finishing machine
US4615147 *Dec 18, 1984Oct 7, 1986Michel ThonneyMachine for tumbling, deburring and/or polishing bulk products
US4638600 *Mar 28, 1985Jan 27, 1987Lipton Manufacturing CorporationMulti-function work finshing machine using barrel containers
US4727684 *Jan 6, 1987Mar 1, 1988Tipton Manufacturing CorporationFull-automatic work finishing machine with high-speed rotating barrel containers
US7182912May 29, 2002Feb 27, 2007Bayer CorporationFluid handling apparatus for an automated analyzer
WO2005014226A1 *Jul 7, 2003Feb 17, 2005Hoffman Steve EHigh speed vertical processor
Classifications
U.S. Classification451/329, 494/10, 494/33, 494/38
International ClassificationB24B31/033, B24B31/02, B24B31/023
Cooperative ClassificationB24B31/0218, B24B31/023
European ClassificationB24B31/02D1, B24B31/023