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Publication numberUS3855846 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 24, 1974
Filing dateApr 7, 1972
Priority dateApr 7, 1972
Publication numberUS 3855846 A, US 3855846A, US-A-3855846, US3855846 A, US3855846A
InventorsForget R, Saravis C
Original AssigneeMarine Colloids Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sample applicator
US 3855846 A
Abstract
An applicator for applying aqueous test solutions to a hydrated gel layer for subjection to electrophoretic or chromatographic procedures is in the form of a stiff resilient non-absorbent polymeric sheet having a thickness from 3 to 125 mils and having a hydrophilic surface. The thin film of test solution picked up by the sample holder when dipped in the solution is transferred with precise control of location by pressing the edge of the applicator into the gel.
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ite

Forget et al. Dec. 24, 1974 SAMPLE APPLIQATOR 3,358,496 12/1967 Farmer 73/61.1 c 3,470,847 10/1969 Chapin et al. ll8/506 X [75] Invenmrs- Rmlald f Owl Head 3,495,446 2/1970 Williamson 73/6l.l c 3 m' Waban, 3,505,858 4/1970 Kohn 73 61-.1 c

ass.

[73] Assignee: Marine Colloids, lnc., Rockland, primary Examiner l)onald O Woodie] Mame Assistant Examiner-Joseph W. Roskos [22] Filed: Apr. 7, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 241,921 57 ABSTRACT An applicator for applying aqueous test solutions to a [52] Cl 6 C.15/236 0 4 hydrated gel layer for subjection to electrophoretic or [51] Int Cl G01 31/08 chromatographic procedures is in the form of a stiff [58] Fi i C resilient non-absorbent polymeric sheet having a e 2 53: S j thickness from 3 to 125 mils and having a hydrophilic 210/31 C 0 15/256 117/111 f surface. The thin film of test solution picked up by the 118/506. 401/4 6 264 sample holder when dipped in the solution is transp 4 ferred with precise control of location by pressing the 5 6] References Cited edge of the applicator into the gel.

UN TED STATES PATENTS 5 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures 2,868,020 l/l959 Williams, J1. 73/61.] C 'X PATENTED UEB-24IBH FLT! I n l8 IFIG. 3

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SAWLE APPLICATOR This invention relates to an applicator for applying aqueous test samples to hydrated gel films for subjection to electrophoretic or chromatographic procedures.

In carrying out such procedures it is important, for best results, to place a small controlled quantity of the aqueous test solution in a precisely controlled location in or on the gel film. In the past it has been customary to use applicators consisting of a pair of parallel wires holding the sample of test solution between them by capillary attraction or other forms of .devices relying on capillarity for holding and delivering the sample. These devices do not provide close control over the sample, and they make it difficult to locate the sample in as precisely defined a location as desired. In addition,they require the development of considerable manual skill for effective use.

The present invention provides a sample applicator simple and inexpensive in construction and simple in operation, requiring little or no skill for-successful use. In the drawings:

FIG. I is an isometric view showing one embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken along line 2-2 FIG. I;

' FIG. 3 is a view in side elevation showing the applicator of FIG. 1 removably mounted upon a carrier;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view along line 44 of FIG. 3 showing a sample being applied to a gel film; FIG. 5 is a view inside elevation of another embodiment of the invention; and

FIG. 6 is a sectional view along line 6-6 of FIG. 5.

As shown in the drawings, the applicator of the pres- 'ent invention comprises a stiff, resilient sheet of synthetic polymeric material having a plurality of projecting spaced apart sample holders l0, 10 having nonporous non-absorbent hydrophilic surfaces upon which water and aqueous solutions readily spread to form thin films of relatively unifonn thickness. Means for mount ing the sample holders on a handle is provided in the form of a layer of pressure sensitive adhesive 12 covered with a release paper 14 bonded to one face of the sheet along the length thereof near its upper edge.

In order to use the applicator the release paper 1 4 is removed and the applicator is removably mounted on rigid plastic handle 16 by pressing the adhesive surface against the surface of the handle. The sample holders 10 are then dipped to any desired depth in the aqueous sample solution, withdrawn together with a thin film of the, solution adhering to their wetted surfaces, and then pressed against the hydrated gel layer or film 18 to which. the sample is to be applied as shown'in FIG. 4, preferably penetrating the gel, and withdrawn, leaving a deposit of the sample solution where the sample holders have come into contact with the gel.

Sample holders 10 may-be of any convenient thickness from 3 to 125 mils, preferably 3 to 10 mils. I-Iolders much thinnerthan 3 mils tend to be unsatisfactory because of excessive flexibility or fragility when pressed against the gel surface, while those thicker than 125 mils tend to deposit the sample over too large an area. The length of the bottom or gel-contacting edge of each sample holder, all of which are preferably straight and aligned with each other, is a matter of choice, usually ranging from about one-fourth to l inch. The size of the spaces between sample holders is also a matter of choice, usually being of the order of one-eighth to one-fourth inch. The height of each sample holder and handle measured in a direction perpendicular to the bottom or gelcontacting edge must be sufiiciently great so that the fingers of the operator do not come into contact with the sample or with the gel surface. It is desirable that the spacesbetween adjacent sample holders 10 be 'sufiiciently deep so that their upper edges do not come into contact with the gel whenthe samples are being applied, so that each sample deposited by each sample holder is separate and distinct from neighboring deposits, being spaced apart from them by the width of the space between adjacent sample holders.

The polymeric sheet material from which the applicator is formed may be any one of a wide variety of syn-' thetic materials which are relatively stiff, resilient, and non-porous in nature such as polystyrene, polypropylene, polymethyl methacrylate, polyacrylic esters, superpolyamides such as nylon, polyesters such as polyethylene terephthalate, polycarbonates, polyvinyl chloride, polyvinyl butyral, copolymers of acrylonitrile, butadiene, and styrene, and manyothers. The surface of the sheet forming the sample holders must be hydrophilic, i.e., capable of being readily wet by water and aqueous solutions so that the latter spread into a thin film on the surface rather than standing in the form of beads or droplets of indeterminate size and distribution. The foregoing polymeric materials are for the most part hydrophobic rather than hydrophilic in nature, so that the surface of the sheet must be subbed or treated by any oneof the numerous well known procedures for rendering it hydrophilic, among which are exposure to'an electric corona discharge, treatment with ozone, ultraviolet radiation, concentrated sulfuric acid, tetraethyl titanate, tetraisopropyl titanate, nitrous oxide, copolymers of 'vinylidene chloride, acrylic ester and itaconic acid, gelatin and others. Two or more of such procedures may be used in combination, either simultaneously or successively, as is well known. In general, a surface against which water forms a contact angle from 0 to. 10 is sufficiently hydrophilic for use in the present invention; preferably the contact angle is 0.

The hydrated gel films 18 commonly employed in chromatographic and electrophoretic procedures, including such materials as agar, agarose, starch, polyacrylamide, and the like, are usually in the form of a film or layer from 1 to 2 millimeters in thickness and are tender, readily cut materials supported, during the electrophoretic or chromatographic procedure, upon a rigid support or backing member 20 (FIG. 4). In using the applicator, it is preferred to hold it at right angles to the surface of the gel film, asshown in FIG. 4, and press it against the rigidly supported film to penetrate and cut the latter substantially throughout its thickness by means of the straight bottom edges while depositing the sample solution.

The applicator of the present invention can also be used to deposit a sample at the bottom of a slot or well, which has been precut or preformed in the gel film.

Another form of the applicator of the present invention is shown in FIGS. 5 and 6 in which the stiff resilient sheet forming sample holders 22, 22 is embedded in a handle 24 of plastic material, the entire device being disposable.

Excellent results have been attained by using as the flexible sheet a 4 mil sheet of polyethylene terephthalate subbed with a copolymer of vinylidene chloride, acrylic ester and itaconic acid and with gelatin cured by heating, sold under the trademark Cronar. With this material, a sample holder one-fourth inch in width can be used to deposit a sample as small as 0.5 microliter on a gel film. Excellent results have also been obtained using polymethyl methacrylate for handle 16, while polyethylene is suitable for handle 24. The sheet from which sample holders 22 are made may be simply a friction fit within a slot in handle 24. While individual sample holders may be separately attached to the handles, it is preferred, when more than a single sample holder is to be attached to an individual handle, to cut all of them from a single sheet of material, leaving them connected at their upper ends as appears in FIG. 1.

The capacity of the sample holders for holding aqueous solution can be increased, if desired, by slightly abrading or roughening the surface, for example by scraping gently with a penknife.

What is claimed is:

1. An applicator for applying samples of aqueous test solution to a hydrated gel film for subjection to electrophoretic or chromatographic procedures comprising a plurality of spaced apart stiff resilient non-absorbent polymeric sheet sample holders having a thickness from 3 to mils and having a hydrophilic surface each sample holder having an uninterrupted straight flat bottom.

2. An applicator as claimed in claim 1 comprising in addition means for removably mounting said applicator upon a handle.

3. An applicator as claimed in claim 2 in which said means comprises a layer of pressure sensitive adhesive bonded to said sheet.

4. An applicator as claimed in claim 1 in which all of the sample holders are integral parts of a single sheet and all have theirstraight edges aligned with each other for contacting said gel film.

5. An applicator for applying a sample of aqueous test solution to a hydrated gel film supported on a rigid support member for subjection to electrophoretic or chromatographic procedures comprising a stiff resilient non-porous sheet of polymeric material having a thickness from 3 to 10 mils and having a hydrophilic surface on which water spreads to a thin film, the bottom edge of said sheet being straight, flat, and free from grooves and a handle connected to said sheet.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2868020 *Feb 24, 1955Jan 13, 1959Beckman Instruments IncApparatus for applying a liquid sample
US3358496 *Aug 3, 1965Dec 19, 1967Farmer Larry BChromatographic applicator
US3470847 *Dec 19, 1966Oct 7, 1969United Medical Lab IncDifferential slide maker
US3495446 *Jun 19, 1967Feb 17, 1970Cordis CorpApplicator for chromatography and electrophoresis
US3505858 *Nov 16, 1967Apr 14, 1970Shandon Scient Co LtdApplicator means
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4006705 *Apr 12, 1976Feb 8, 1977Helena Laboratories CorporationLimited pressure applicator
US4086372 *Apr 12, 1976Apr 25, 1978Helena Laboratories CorporationMethod for applying an organic liquid sample
US4364145 *Jan 12, 1981Dec 21, 1982Jones John FScraping tool
US5405516 *Jul 8, 1993Apr 11, 1995SebiaApparatus for the application of biological samples to an electrophoretic slab support
US5464515 *Jun 4, 1993Nov 7, 1995Sebia, A Corp. Of FranceApparatus for the application of biological samples to an electrophoretic slab support
US5681437 *Oct 31, 1995Oct 28, 1997Isolab, Inc.Sample deposition device
US5683915 *Oct 31, 1995Nov 4, 1997Isolab, Inc.Solid phase media
US6309600May 20, 1998Oct 30, 2001Biotrove, Inc.Apparatus for droplet microchemistry
US7435388Feb 10, 2003Oct 14, 2008Alfa Wassermann, S.P.A.Applicator of a fluid sample on a substrate
US7588725Feb 22, 2005Sep 15, 2009Biotrove, Inc.Auto-injection system for high throughput screening of fluidic samples; fluidic circuits; Increasing throughput of analysis of selected components in complex biological, chemical and/or environmental matrices using chromatography and/or mass spectrometry
US8410426Nov 3, 2008Apr 2, 2013Agilent Technologies, Inc.Devices and methods for coupling mass spectrometry devices with chromatography systems
US8414774Sep 15, 2009Apr 9, 2013Agilent Technologies, Inc.Systems and methods for high-throughput screening of fluidic samples
US8470148Jan 19, 2009Jun 25, 2013Ge Healthcare Bio-Sciences AbMethod for sample application
US8677808Nov 3, 2008Mar 25, 2014Agilent Technologies, Inc.Sample injection system
EP0071491A1 *Jun 18, 1982Feb 9, 1983L'orealMethod of sampling and analysing by plate chromatography, and apparatus therefor
EP0198803A2 *Apr 11, 1986Oct 22, 1986Carla MorlacchiAn automatic machine for the electrophoresis of blood
EP0493996A1 *Dec 12, 1991Jul 8, 1992SebiaApparatus for applying of biological samples to an electrophoresis plate
EP0911631A1 *Dec 12, 1991Apr 28, 1999SebiaApparatus for the application of biological samples to an electrophoresis plate
EP1887350A2 *Aug 9, 2007Feb 13, 2008Universidad Del Pais Vasco-Euskal Herriko UnibersitateaMethod for loading samples for submerged agarose gel electrophoresis
WO1997042496A1 *May 5, 1997Nov 13, 1997Henry GarseeA system for the application of samples on a substrate__________
WO1999011373A2 *Aug 20, 1998Mar 11, 1999Ian W HunterApparatus and methods for droplet microchemistry
WO2009091320A1 *Jan 19, 2009Jul 23, 2009Ge Healthcare Bio Sciences AbMethod for sample application
Classifications
U.S. Classification73/61.54, 401/264, 118/506
International ClassificationG01N27/447, G01N30/91, G01N30/00
Cooperative ClassificationG01N27/44743, G01N30/91
European ClassificationG01N30/91, G01N27/447B4