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Publication numberUS3856079 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 24, 1974
Filing dateMar 23, 1971
Priority dateJan 31, 1968
Publication numberUS 3856079 A, US 3856079A, US-A-3856079, US3856079 A, US3856079A
InventorsGeppelt E
Original AssigneeGeppelt E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Finned tube heat exchange conductor
US 3856079 A
Abstract
A finned tube heat exchange conductor has as its fin a continuous wire helix of undulating configuration characterized by outwardly extending loops between the points of securement.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Geppelt v 4] 1 NED T E HEAT EXCHANGE NDUCT [76] inventor: Elm Geppelt, 1911 S. Delaware PL, a, Okla. 74104 22 Filed: Mar. 23, 1971 211 Appl.No.: 127,338

Related U.S. Application Data [63] Continuation of Ser. No. 702,010, Jan. 31, 1968,

abandoned.

[52] U.S. Cl. 165/184, 29/1573 AH [51] Int. F28b l/36 [58] Fiel Search 165/184 [56] References Cited 5 UNITED STATES PATENTS 9/1928 Whitney 29/157.3 A

[ 1 Dec. 24, 1974 2,277,462 3/1942 Spofford 165/184 X Primary Examiner Assistant Examiner uel A. Antonakas ophil W. Streule, Jr. Attorney, Agent, or FirmYoung & Thompson [5 7 ABSTRACT A finned tube heat exchange conductor has as its fin a continuous wire helix of characteri the points un ting configuration by outw ext ing loops between ecureme 9 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures en 165/184 x 165/184 x mgmgnniczmm 3856.079

INVEN Young 9* Thompson ATTORNEYS FINNED TUBE HEAT EXCHANGE CONDUCTOR This application is a continuation of Ser. No. 702,010 filed Jan. 31, 1968, now abandoned.

The present invention relates to finned tube heat exchange conductors, more particularly of the type in which the fin is helically disposed about the tube.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a finned tube heat exchange conductor, in which the fin can be easily preformed from standard wire or rod stock.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of a finned tube heat exchange conductor, in which the over-all coefficient of heat transfer is desirably high.

Finally, it is an object of the present invention to provide a finned tube heat exchange conductor which will be relatively simple and inexpensive to manufacture, easy to maintain and repair, and rugged and durable in use.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from a consideration of the following description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary perspective view of a finned tube heat exchange conductor according to the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary end view of part of the heat exchange conductor of FIG. 1, showing one embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 2, but showing a different embodiment from FIG. 2, namely, the embodiment of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a view illustrating the method of prefabrication of the fin prior to attachment to the tube; and

FIG. 5 is a view from which the manner of attachment of the fin to the tube'can be readily seen.

Referring now to the drawing in greater detail, there is shown a finned tube heat exchange conductor according to the present invention, comprising a tube 1 of heat-conductive metal of conventional nature. Tube 1 is of the usual cylindrical type and may be straight or bent or formed in any desired configuration.

Helically disposed about tube 1 is a heat exchange fin 3, also shown in detail in FIG. 3. Fin 3 comprises a plurality of relatively straight or flat portions 5, of substantial length peripherally of tube 1, that is, longitudinally of the helix-The portions 5 are spaced apart by loops 7 of arcuate configuration. It will be understood, however, that loops 7 could also be squared, so that fin 3 could be in a crenellated or castellated form.

Although fin 3 is shown in the drawing as being round wire, it will also be understood that it could be of square or other polygonal cross'section, and could be of rod or bar stock for larger installations. In any event, it is intended that fin 3 be of metal and fastened to tube 1 by welding by any conventional welding process. In this connection, it should be noted that it is not necessary that every portion 5 be welded to tube 1: it will often suffice that only an occasional portion 5 be welded.

Another embodiment of fin 3 is shown in FIG. 2. Th

I fin shape of FIG. 2 is sinusoidal. The points of contact between the fin and the tube are at the apices of outwardly opening loops 9, spaced apart by loops 11 which correspond roughly to loops 7 in the embodiment of FIG. 3.

But whatever the shape of fin 3, it is preferred that fin 3 be of substantially constant cross-sectional configgeneratrix of its helix. This is to say that at all points along its length, fin 3 will be disposed in its tangent plane. Stated another way, all the elements of the helix of fin 3 are radially disposed.

FIG. 4 shows one of the many ways in which fin 3 can be prefabricated. As is there shown, a pair of mating rolls 13 and 15 rotate about parallel axes in opposite directions and have complementary opposed faces that crimp the stock of fin 3 between them.

From the prefabricated fin of FIG. 4, it is a simple matter to dispose it helically about tube 1 and then to weld it to tube 1 as at welds 17, shown in FIG. 5.

From a consideration of the foregoing disclosure, therefore, it will be evident that all of the initially recited objects of the present invention have been achieved.

Although the present invention has been described and illustrated in connection with preferred embodiments, it is to be understood that modifications and variations may be resorted to without departing from the spirit of the invention, as those skilled in this art will readily understand. Such modifications and variations are considered to be within the purview and scope of the present invention as defined by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A finned tube heat exchange conductor comprising a tube, and a heat transfer fin on the tube, the fin comprising an elongated metal member disposed helically about the tube and contacting the tube at a plurality of spaced locations along its helix, said member hav ing portions spaced substantial distances outwardly from the tube between said spaced locations, said fin lying on the locus of the generatrix of its helix.

2. A finned tube heat exchange conductor as claimed in claim 1, said fin having substantially uniform cross section throughout its length.

3. A finned tube heat exchange conductor as claimed in claim 1, said outwardly spaced portions being in the form of loops.

4. A finned tube heat exchange conductor as claimed in claim 1, said fin contacting the tube over a substantial length at each of said spaced locations.

5. A finned tube heat exchange conductor as claimed in claim 4, said outwardly spaced portions being in the form of arcuate loops.

6. A finned tube heat exchange conductor as claimed in claim 1, the configuration of said fin being sinusoidal.

7. A finned tube heat exchange conductor as claimed in claim 1, said fin being bonded to said tube at at least some of said spaced locations.

8. A finned tube heat exchange conductor as claimed in claim 7, said tube and fin being metal.

9. A finned tube heat exchange conductor as claimed in claim 1, said fin having substantially uniform cross section throughout its length, said outwardly spaced portions being in the form of loops, said fin lying on the locus of the generatrix of its helix, said tube and fin being metal.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1685657 *Jul 19, 1922Sep 25, 1928Gen ElectricComposite metal article
US2277462 *Dec 22, 1939Mar 24, 1942Gen ElectricHeat transfer surface
US3217392 *May 18, 1962Nov 16, 1965Franciscus RoffelsenHeat exchanger elements
US3397440 *Sep 30, 1965Aug 20, 1968David DalinMethod of making heat exchanger having extended surface
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4259771 *Mar 22, 1979Apr 7, 1981Nishiyodo Air Conditioner Co., Ltd.Apparatus for producing heat transfer tube
US4352227 *Jul 14, 1980Oct 5, 1982Nishiyodo Air Conditioner Co., Ltd.Apparatus for producing a finned tube for heat transfer
US4655282 *Aug 29, 1984Apr 7, 1987Spiro Research B. V.Heat exchanger duct with heat exchange wiring
EP0062729A1 *Apr 15, 1981Oct 20, 1982Atlas Copco AktiebolagA conduit device
EP0339552A1 *Apr 24, 1989Nov 2, 1989Asahi Kasei Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaMethod of manufacturing a heat exchanger
EP0428908A1 *Oct 26, 1990May 29, 1991Mitsubishi Jukogyo Kabushiki KaishaHeat transfer pipe and method of making the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/184, 29/890.46
International ClassificationF28F1/12
Cooperative ClassificationF28F1/122
European ClassificationF28F1/12B