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Publication numberUS3857493 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 31, 1974
Filing dateSep 26, 1973
Priority dateJun 29, 1973
Also published asCA971132A1
Publication numberUS 3857493 A, US 3857493A, US-A-3857493, US3857493 A, US3857493A
InventorsBourne W
Original AssigneeBourne W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Collapsible garment dryer
US 3857493 A
Abstract
A collapsible garment dryer consisting of a rigid standard or post member having a plurality of arms pivotally attached thereto by a head secured to the standard at one end thereof and a collar member slidably mounted on the standard. The collar member is engagable with the arms in each of an operative position wherein the arms radiate outwardly from the standard and the collapsed position wherein the arms extend longitudinally along the standard retaining the arms in their respective positions. Locking means are provided for the collar retaining it in respective ones of the arm supporting positions. The standard is a telescopic member having a lower pointed earth penetrating means with a collar limiting the depth of penetration and provided with a lower flat surface engagable with the ground to stabilize the dryer in its operative in use position.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Bourne 1 Dec. 31, 1974 COLLAPSIBLE GARMENT DRYER 221 Filed: Sept. 26, 1973 21 Appl. No.: 400,940

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data June 29, 1973 Canada 175337 [52] US. Cl 211/178 A [51] Int. Cl. A47f 5/10 [58] Field of Search 211/178 A, 104; 135/2, 135/16, 15 P0, 20 R; 248/434, 435, 85, 87

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 196,723 10/1877 Sundquist 135/2 UX 1,075,395 10/1913 Beegle 211/178 A 1,525,701 2/1925 Rose et a1. 211/178 A 1,588,391 6/1926 Berry 135/2 2,589,564 3/1952 Moore 211/104 X 2,852,307 9/1958 Clarlt 248/87 X FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 285,484 4/1929 Great Britain 135/2 Primary ExaminerDonald A. Griffin Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Stanley E. Johnson 5 7 ABSTRACT A collapsible garment dryer consisting of a rigid standard or post member having a plurality of arms pivotally attached thereto by a head secured to the standard at one end thereof and a collar member slidably mounted on the standard. The collar member is engagable with the arms in each of an operative position wherein the arms radiate outwardly from the standard and the collapsed position wherein the arms extend longitudinally along the standard retaining the arms in their respective positions. Locking means are provided for the collar retaining it in respective ones of the arm supporting positions. The standard is a telescopic member having a lower pointed earth penetrating means with a collar limiting the depth of penetration and provided with a lower flat surface engagable with the ground to stabilize the dryer in its operative in use position.

5 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures I COLLAPSIBLE GARMENT DRYER This invention relates to a portable collapsible clothes dryer.

Portable collapsible clothes dryers are known as exemplified and illustrated in the following patents: U.S. Pat. No. 3,069,021 issued Dec. 18, 1962 to R. C. Gray; U.S. Pat. No. 2,022,712 issued Dec. 3, 1935 to E. C. Firle and U.S. Pat. No. 1,951,979 issued Mar. 20, 1934 to J. S. Hoffmire.

Each of the foregoing patented structures consist of a plurality of arms pivotally mounted and radiating outwardly from the top end of a standard with means for supporting the standard in a free standing position. The patented structures are complicated consisting of numerous parts and somewhat cumbersome to use. It is applicants intention to provide a simple, easily constructed portable clothes dryer which may be readily assembled and dis-assembled from one position to another of an operative and collapsed storage state.

It is a principle object of the present invention to provide a collapsible portable clothes dryer for use by campers and mobile home travellers. In this environment it is necessary that the portable dryer occupy minimum space, remain assembled in each of the collapsed and assembled state and also, be readily and easily assembled and collapsed at the site. It is also necessary in a number of trailer and camp sites to have selfsupporting clothes dryers located closely adjacent the trailer or tent. A portable clothes dryer is also required in a number of camp sites and trailer parks as stringing lines from the camper unit to a tree or from one tree to another tree is prohibited. The clothes dryer, when in use, should also be neat appearing and simple without extraneous structure avoiding a cluttering aesthetic effect to otherwise normally neatly and orderly appearing camp ground and camp sites.

Accordingly there is provided in accordance with the present invention a collapsible garment dryer comprising a rigid standard; a plurality of arms pivotally attached adjacent one end thereof to the standard for free pivotal movement between an operative position wherein they radiate outwardly from the standard and a collapsed position wherein they extend longitudinally along the standard; a collar slidably mounted on said standard and supportingly engagable with the arms respectively in each of the operative and collapsed position of the arms to retain them in their respective positons; lock means for retaining said collar in supporting engagement with the arms in the operative positon of the latter to support the same adjacent their pivotal connection to the standard; lock means for retaining the collar in the collapsed position and means on said collar to retain the free end of said arms adjacent said standard when the arms are in their collapsed position.

The invention is illustrated by way of example in the accompanying drawings wherein FIG. I is a perspective view of the clothes dryer, constructed in accordance with the present, in its operative position;

FIG. 2 illustrates the clothes dryer shown in FIG. 1 in a collapsed condition;

FIG. 3 is a bottom plan view, in full size, of the member used to pivotally attached the arms to the standard;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view, on a reduced scale, taken along section 4-4- of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of a collar slidably mounted on the post and engagable with the arms to support the same in each of an operative and collapsed position;

FIG. 6 is a partial cross-sectional view showing the pivotal mounting of the arms on the post and collar member supporting the arms in such position;

FIG. 7 is a broken view of one of the arms incorporating a modification and which includes clothes pins permanently attached thereto;

FIG. 8 is a section taken substantially along line 77 of FIG. 7; and

FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional view of a modified collar.

Referring now in detail to the drawings, shown in FIG. 1 is a portable collapsible clothes dryer consisting basically of a standard or post 10 having a plurality of arms 11 pivotally attached thereto and radiating outwardly therefrom adjacent the upper end of the standard. The clothes dryer in FIG. 1 is shown in its operative position wherein the arms radiate outwardly from the standard and in FIG. 2 in a collapsed position wherein the arms extend longitudinally along the standard. l

The standard 10 consists of a tubular member 12 having a rod or further tubular member 13 telescopi cally arranged therein. The members 12 and 13 may be locked in various telescopic positions by a sleeve 15 having a thumb set screw 16 threaded therein and which passes through an aperture (not shown) in the tubular member 12 for engagement with the member 13.

A flange member 17 is secured to the standard member 13 by a pin, set screw or the like and has a lower substantially flat face 18 for engagement with the ground surface limiting the depth of penetration of the member 13 into the ground and which provides stability for the dryer by engagement with the ground surface in a dryer operative position. The lower face 18 alternatively obviously may be concave if desired. The member 17 has an upper generally flat surface 19 and a truncated conical surface 20 either one or both of which may be stepped on by ones foot to drive the pointed end 20 of member 13 into the ground.

The arms 11 are pivotally attached to the standard by a head 22 secured to the standard 12 by a pin, friction fit, screw threads or the like. The arms are held in an operative position as shown in FIG. 1 and in a collapsed position as shown in FIG. 2 by a collar 23 slidably mounted on the standard 12 and engagable with the arms in each of their respective operative and collapsed positions. The collar 23 is held in an arm operative supporting position by a locking pin 24 and in arm collapsed position by a locking member 25.

The head member 22 is shown in detail in FIGS. 3, 4 and 6 and is a rigid member made of a plastics material, wood, metal or combinations therof. The head member 22 has a central recess 26 corresponding in cross-sectional shape to the outline cross-sectional shape of the upper end of the standard or post member 12. The post member or standard 12 is preferably a tubular pipe, circular, in cross-section, however, it may be a square tubular member or any other shape as desired. The head 22 may be held on the post member 12 by a pin 66 (see FIG. 6) passing through aligned apertures in the head member 22 and upper end of the post member 12. Alternattively the head may be held on the post by frictional engagement or by internal threads on the recess 26 mating with external threads on the upper end of the post. In the event of frictional fit, the recess 26 is preferably slightly tapered outwardly from the bottom end to its open end which receives the post. The lower face of the head, as seen in FIGS. 4 and 6, has an annual recess 27 providing respectively inner and outer flanges 28 and 29. The outer flange 29 has a plurality of recesses 30 directed radially outward from the center of the member and which receive respective ones of the arms 11 in their operative radial projecting position as illustrated in FIG. 1. The number of recesses 30 corresponds to the number of arms 11 and serve to retain the arms in circumferential spaced relation relative to one another in their operative position. Each of the recesses 30 merge with respective ones of further recesses 31 extending inwardly into the head member from the lower face and which also penetrate more deeply into the head than the annular recess 27 as clearly seen from FIGS. 3, 4 and 6. The recesses 31 receive a hooked end portion of respective ones of the arms 11 and thereby retain the arms in circumferential spaced apart relation.

The arms 11 may bemetal, plastic or the like or combinations thereof and preferably are made of a spring steel material providing substantial strength. They may, however, be made of filament glass, spun glass or the like. Each arm terminates in an outer free end covered preferably with a resilient cap member 32 of plastic, rubber or the like and an inner hooked end 33 pivotally attached to the head member 22. The hooked end 33 of each arm receives a ring member 34 located in the annular recess 27. The ring 34 is retained in the annular recess 27 by a plurality of fasteners for example, wood screw members, screwed into the head 22 and located between each adjacent pair of recesses 31. One such screw member is illustrated in phantom in FIG. 6 and designated 35. The ring 34 held in position by the screws 35 on the head 22 pivotally secures the arms 11 to the head and recesses 31 and 33 retain the arms in their respective circumferential spaced apart positions.

The collar 23 is a rigid member made of plastics material, wood, metal or combinations thereof and is slidably mounted on the post 12 as previously mentioned engaging the arms in each of their respective operative and collapsed positions. The collar 23 has a central bore 36 which slidably receives the post and an upper face 37 provided with an annular groove 38. The collar 23 is shown in FIG. 6 engaging the lower surface of an arm 11 retaining the same in its operative position. The collar 23 is locked in such position by the pin member 24 which passes through aligned apertures 39 in the tubular member 12. In place of pin 24 the collar 23 may be locked in position by means of internal threads in the bore 36 threadably engagable with external threads on the tubular member 12.

The collar 23 in the event it is made of wood, may be provided with an annular reinforcing ring member 40 of steel or the like preventing damage to the collar from the weight of garments on the arms when the device is in its operative position.

The head 22 and slidably mounted collar 23 are appropriately shaped to provide a pleasing appearance and when in the operative position, as shown in FIG. 1,

appear as a hub mounted on the post 12 with the arms radiating outwardly therefrom. This provides a device which is pleasing in appearance and simple to construct.

In order to place the arms in their operative position from the collapsed position, the entire device is turned upside down from the position viewed in FIG. 1 so that the head member 22 may be rested on the ground after which the collar 23 may be moved from its locking position allowing the arms to freely pivot to their radially outward position. Thereafter the collar 23 is slid into engagement with the arms and locked in position, turning the assembly to an upright position the collar 23 supports the arms in their operative radiating outwardly position by direct engagement therewith adjacent the arms respective pivotal connection to the head 22. To move the arms to their collapsed position, the collar 23 is slid longitudinally along the tubular member 12 after removing the lock pin 24 allowing the arms to pivot freely into a position extending longitudinally along the tubular member 12. The collar is then slid along the tubular member 12 toward the free end of the arms and at the same time the free end of the arms 11 is placed in the annular groove 38 after which the collar 23 is locked in place by the locking member 25. The locking member 25, as shown in FIG. 1, consists of a sleeve having a wing-head set screw 41 threaded therein and engagable with the outer surface of the tubular post member 12. Obviously the locking member 25 may be replaced by any other convenient locking means as for example, external threads on the tubular member 12 threadingly engagable with internal threads in the bore 36 of collar 23.

Shown in FIGS. 7 and 8 is an alternative arrangement wherein the arms have clothes pins or garments retaining members permanently attached thereto. Referring to FIGS. 7 and 8 there is shown an arm 110 having a hooked end 33a and an opposite free end 32a. A wire member is attached as by welding or the like to the arm 11a at respective spaced apart positions 51 and 52. The wire member 50 extends longitudinally along the arms 11a and is offset therefrom and located slightly vertically thereabove when the arm 11a is in an operative position as illustrated in FIG. 8. One or more clip members 53 are pivotally attached to the wire member 50 by a hooked end portion 54. The clip member may be made from a single length of a ribbon of a spring steel material and appropriately bent to provide the hooked portion 54 at one end and a U-shaped jaw 55 at the other end appropriately positioned to snap on to the arm 11a. The garment fastening clips 53 alternatively may be made from a wire spring material, a plastics material or combinations thereof either in wire or ribbon form.

An alternative slidable collar member 23a is illustrated in FIG. 9 and consists of an annular member, channel shaped in cross-section providing a channel 38a located between an inner flange and an outer flange 61. The collar 23a may be moulded from a plastics material or alternatively stamped from metal and if desired the inner diameter of the outer flange 61 may be slightly larger than the outer diameter of the head 22 and thereby telescopically receive the lower end portion of the head 22 when the dryer is in its operative position. The collar 23a may be locked in position by pin 24 in the same manner as illustrated in FIG. 6 or alternatively pass through aligned apertures in the collar and post. Alternatively the flange 60 may be internally threaded as at 62 for threadable engagement with external threads on the tubular post 12 in respective ones of the dryer operative and collapsed positions. Flange 61 also if desired may be provided with internal threads as indicated at 63 for threadable engagement with external threads on the outer surface of flange 30 of the head 22 thereby providing means to adjustably lock the collar in an arm supporting position.

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

l. A collapsible garment dryer comprising:

a. a rigid standard;

b. a head member secured to said standard adjacent one end thereof and having an end face circumscribing said standard and facing the opposite end thereof, said end face having an annular groove therein;

c. an annular ring located in said annular groove and securely fastened to said head member;

d. a plurality of arms each having a hooked end embracing said annular ring and thereby pivotally attaching the same for free pivotal movement between an operative position wherein they radiate outwardly from the standard to a collapsed position wherein they extend longitudinally along the standard;

e. a collar slidably mounted on said standard and supportingly engageable with the arms respectively in each of the operative and collapsed position of the arms to retain them in their respective positions; f. lock means for retaining said collar in supporting engagement with the arms in the operative position of the latter to support the same adjacent their pivotal connection to the standard; g. lock means for retaining the collar adjacent the free end of the arms in their collapsed position; and

h. means on said collar to retain the free end of said arms adjacent said standard when the arms are in their collapsed position.

2. A collapsible garment dryer as defined in claim 1 wherein said standard comprises a. telescopic member and including means to lock the telescopic member at various different selected lengths thus providing means to varying the height of the dryer.

3. A collapsible garment dryer as defined in claim 1 wherein the standard has a member attached thereto at a position spaced from the pivotally mounted arms to limit the depth of penetration of the standard when driven into the ground.

4. A collapsible garment dryer as defined in claim 3 wherein said depth penetrating member has a substantially flat bottom face engagable with the ground to stabilize the dryer when driven partly into the ground.

5. A collapsible garment dryer as defined in claim 1 including a plurality of grooves in said head extending in a direction radially outward from the standard locating the respective arms in circumferential spaced relation relative to one another.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US196723 *Jul 19, 1877Oct 30, 1877 Chables sundquist
US1075395 *Feb 13, 1913Oct 14, 1913Norman C BeegleRack.
US1525701 *Oct 18, 1922Feb 10, 1925Rose Samuel SFolding utility rack
US1588391 *Jun 18, 1924Jun 8, 1926Berry FrankTent frame
US2589564 *Jul 12, 1950Mar 18, 1952Joseph A MooreGarment hanger
US2852307 *Mar 4, 1957Sep 16, 1958Clark James THose sprinkler nozzle supports
GB285484A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5816417 *Jun 11, 1997Oct 6, 1998Reaves; Joan MarieMini clothes line
US7703732Jun 9, 2008Apr 27, 2010Lynn Marion DantuonoDeck accessory bracket
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/197
International ClassificationD06F57/04, D06F57/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06F57/04
European ClassificationD06F57/04