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Publication numberUS3857960 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 31, 1974
Filing dateDec 29, 1972
Priority dateDec 29, 1972
Also published asCA1020091A1
Publication numberUS 3857960 A, US 3857960A, US-A-3857960, US3857960 A, US3857960A
InventorsMackles L
Original AssigneeBristol Myers Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toilet oil bar
US 3857960 A
Abstract
A toilet oil bar or cake adapted to release oil when wet with water. The oil bar is made by solidifying mineral oil with monoethanolamine stearic acid amide; N,N distearoyl ethylenediamine or mixtures thereof. The bar may also contain a non-ionic or anionic emulsifying agent to aid in the release of the oil.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

iter l States Patent [1 1 Maelrles [451 Dec. 31, 1974 [73] Assignee: Bristol-Myers Company, New York,

[22] Filed: Dec. 29, 1972 [21] Appl. N0.: 319,593

[52] 11.8. C1 424/365, 252/153, 424/358 [51] llnt. Cl A61k 7/00. [58] Field of Search 424/358, 365; 252/153 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,114,370 4/l938 Bickenaeuser 424/358 2,398,254 4/1946 Rosenthal 424/358 2,751,358

6/1956 Caviet 252/153 3,101,300 8/1963 Siegal et a1. 424/358 3,507,806 4/1970 Barker et al. 252/153 X FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 708,585 4/1965 Canada 424/ 158 Primary Examiner-Frederick E. Waddell Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Irving Holtzman; George A. Mentis; David J. Mugford 57 ABSTRACT A toilet oil bar or cake adapted to release oil when wet with water. The oil bar is made by solidifying mineral oil with monoethanolamine stearic acid amide; N,N distearoyl ethylen'cdiamine or mixtures thereof. The bar may also contain a non-ionic or anionic emulsifying agent to aid in the release of the oil.

9 Claims, No Drawings TOILET 01L BAR This invention relates to a toilet bar or cake adapted to release oil when wet with water. More particularly, it concerns the incorporation of relatively large amounts of mineral oil in a toilet bar from which the subsequent release of oil can be effected when the bar is wet with warm water and applied to the skin. This will give an oily feel to the skin similar to that obtained from bath oils.

Attempts have been made in the past to add oils to soap bars. These, however, have never been successful in depositing oil on the skin largely because the oil that is so deposited is washed away by the emulsifying action of the soap.

It has now been found that a solid toilet bar or cake may be prepared in which an oil, particularly mineral oil, is incorporated in amounts up to 85% by weight. This is made possible by means of certain amides specified more particularly below. The bar looks and feels like a soap bar, but releases oil as an unstable emulsion when wet with warm water. Though no foam is developed, the white emulsion obtained resembles the lather developed by soap. No matter how the hands or body are rinsed after being rubbed with the mineral oil bar, the oil cannot be removed. The results are similar to those obtained when one uses a bath oil.

The prior art teaches the incorporation of large quantities of mineral oil in cosmetic formulations. However, nothing in this art suggests the use of the amides specified below in solidifying an oil, particularly mineral oil, in a bar as is characteristic of the present invention. Typical of this prior art are the references discussed below.

U.S. Pat. No. 2,085,693 discloses a cold cream preparation having a white mineral oil present in an amount of 54.5% by weight of the total preparation. Other ingredients include white wax, paraffin, white ceresin, borax and 32% water.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,424,849 discloses a bath oil using light or heavy white mineral oil present in percentages as high as 60% for heavy white mineral oil as noted in Formulation 2 and as highas 47% for light white mineral oil as noted in Formulations 1 and 5 in columns 7 and 8. These formulations are noted to differ from other prior art formulations in that they employ octyl dodecanoate in the formulation.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,535,427 discloses a skin moisturizing composition having mineral oil present in a percentage of about 65 to 80% by weight and also includes acetylated lanolin alcohol and isopropyl myristate.

Cosmetic bars are also known in the prior art. These are exemplified by the following references: U.S. Pat. Nos. 1,006,736 to C. Ellis; 2,101,843 to F. Factor et al.; 2,303,932 to B. T. Guild; 2,465,340 to 11. Sharlit; 2,900,306 to J. N. Slater; 3,179,596 to R. E. Farrar et al.; and 3,598,746 to T. J. Kaniecki et al. In this group, U.S. Pat. No. 2,900,306 is of interest in that it discloses a deodorant stick using stearic acid and its salts and alkyl amine soaps as detergents and emulsifiers. However, the concept of incorporating large amounts of oil and particularly, mineral oil is not shown in this reference.

In accordance with the present invention, the oil and particularly mineral oil, is solidified by heating the oil with either or mixtures of two amides. The amides are:

monoethanolamine stearic'acid amide or N,N distearoyl ethylenediamine or mixtures thereof.

The quantity of oil that may be incorporated in the bar of the present invention may amount up to 85% by weight based on the total weight of the bar. However, it is preferred that the oil be maintained in the range of from about to by weight based on the total weight of the bar.

The quantity of the amide component that can be employed in formulating the present oil bars may also vary somewhat. Ordinarily, it will comprise between about 5 to 30% by weight based on the total weight of the bar. One or the other amides specified above may be employed alone as the amide component or they may both be used together in varying amounts to constitute the amide components. In a preferred form of this invention, the amide component comprises about 40% by weight of the amide component of the monoethanolamine stearic acid amide and 60% by weight of the amide component of N,N distearoyl ethylenediamine.

To facilitate the transferal of the oil from the bar to the skin and to help emulsify the oil to form a latherlike emulsion, it is advantageous to incorporate a nonionic or anionic emulsifying agent or mixtures thereof in the bar. By way of illustrating the emulsifying agents of these characters that are useful herein, mention may be made of the following: among the non-ionics: diethanolamine stearic acid amide; sorbitan trioleate (Span polyoxyethylene sorbitan monolaurate (polysorbate 20) (Tween 20), polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (polysorbate 80) (Tween 80); among the anionics: sodium lauryl sulfate; coconut oil fatty acid ester of 'sodium isethionate (lgepan AC-78); triethanolamine lauryl sulfate; sodium lauroyl lactylate, etc. The quantity of emulsifying agent that may be employed can also vary somewhat. However, when present, the emulsifying agent will ordinarily comprise between about 1 and 10% by weight of the total weight of the bar.

As previously noted, in preparing the oil bars of this invention, the mineral oil, the amide component and if desired, the emulsifying agent are mixed and heated together. The bars are formed as the mixture is cooled in a mold. The bars are hard and firm.

The following Examples are given to further illustrate the present invention. It is understood, however, that the invention is not limited thereto.

EXAMPLE 1 Ingredient by Weigh! Mineral oil SUP -190 SSU Visc. 7 Monethanolamine stearic acid amide Diethanolarnine stearic acid amide N,N distearoyl ethylenediamine 1 Perfume val/0000 EXAMPLE 2 Ingredient by Weight Mineral oil USP- SSU Vise. 72.0

EXAMPLE 2-Continued ingredient by Weight Monoethanolamine stearic acid amide 8.0 Diethanolamine stearic acid amide 6.0 N,N distearoyl ethylenediamine li.5 Sodium lauroyl lactylate 2.0 Perfume 0.5

The same procedure described above in Example 1 is used to form an oil bar.

The perfume is added in the above Examples for organoleptic purposes. It may be dispensed with in which event another 0.5% by weight of the mineral oil is added to the composition.

Although the invention has been described with reference to specific forms thereof, it will be understood that many changes and modifications may be made without departing from the spirit of this invention.

What is claimed is:

l. A solid, hard and firm toilet oil bar having the appearance and feel of a soap bar; said oil bar releasing mineral oil when wet with warm water and applied to the skin, said bar containing mineral oil solidified with an amide component; said mineral oil constituting between about 70 percent to 85% by weight of said bar, and said amide component constituting between about 5 percent to 30% by weight of said bar and being selected from the group consisting of monoethanolamine stearic acid amide, N,N distearoyl ethylenediamine and mixtures thereof.

2. The oil bar of claim 1 including an emulsifying agent selected from the group consisting of diethanolamine stearic acid amide; sorbitan trioleate, polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monolaurate, polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monooleate; sodium lauryl sulfate; coconut oil fatty acid ester of sodium isethionate; triethanolamine lauryl sulfate and sodium lauroyl lactylate.

3. The oil bar of to claim 2 wherein said emulsifying agent component comprises from about 1 to about 10% by weight of said bar.

4. The oil bar of to claim 3 wherein said mineral oil comprises from about to about by weight of said bar.

5. The oil bar of to claim 4 in which said amide component comprises monoethanolamine stearic acid amide.

6. The oil bar of to claim 4 wherein said amide component comprises N,N distearoyl ethylenediamine.

7. The oil bar of to claim 4 wherein said amide component comprises a mixture of amides, about 40% by weight of said amide component being monoethanolamine stearic acid amide and about 60% by weight of said amide component being N,N distearoyl ethylenediamine.

8. The oil bar of to claim 7 wherein the emulsifying agent component is diethanolamine stearic acid amide.

9. The oil bar of to claim 7 wherein the emulsifying agent component is a mixture of diethanolamine stearic acid amide and sodium lauroyl lactylate.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2114370 *May 26, 1937Apr 19, 1938Gellocide CorpAgent for the treatment of mucous surfaces
US2398254 *Aug 29, 1941Apr 9, 1946Ninol Dev CoAbsorption bases
US2751358 *Nov 14, 1950Jun 19, 1956Shell DevNon-foaming detergents
US3101300 *Jun 30, 1960Aug 20, 1963Bristol Myers CoClear mineral oil in water emulsion for hair application
US3507806 *Nov 2, 1966Apr 21, 1970Witco Chemical CorpMineral oil-water gels
CA708585A *Apr 27, 1965Frosst & Co Charles ESkin moisturizing concentrate
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5490955 *Mar 24, 1995Feb 13, 1996Elizabeth Arden Company, Division Of Conopco, Inc.Cleansing compositions based on C10 -C16 acyl lactylate
US5496488 *May 17, 1994Mar 5, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyComprising free faty acid, fatty acid soap and mild lathering synthetic surfactant; heating, adding sodium hydroxide to form soap in situ, molding; moisturizing, shelf life
US5817609 *Jan 8, 1997Oct 6, 1998Lever Brothers Company, Division Of Conopco, Inc.Bar composition comprising low viscosity oils pre-thickened by non-antifoaming hydrophobic polymers
US6716420Oct 5, 2001Apr 6, 2004L′OrealMethods of use and of making a mascara comprising at least one coloring agent and at least one heteropolymer
US6726915Jul 16, 2001Apr 27, 2004L'orealCosmetic or pharmaceutical composition in solid form comprising bis-acyl-amides
US6835399Dec 11, 2001Dec 28, 2004L'ORéAL S.A.Cosmetic composition comprising a polymer blend
US6869594Jan 24, 2001Mar 22, 2005L'ORéAL S.A.Transfer-free mascara composition comprising at least one volatile solvent and at least one polymer
US6881400Dec 11, 2001Apr 19, 2005L'oreal S.A.Use of at least one polyamide polymer in a mascara composition for increasing the adhesion of and/or expressly loading make-up deposited on eyelashes
US6960339Jul 17, 2000Nov 1, 2005L'oreal S.A.Compositions structured with at least one polymer and methods of using the same
US6979469Dec 12, 2001Dec 27, 2005L'Oréal, S.A.Use of polyamide polymer in a mascara composition comprising at least one inert filler
US7008619Apr 15, 2003Mar 7, 2006L'oreal S.A.Methods of use and of making a mascara comprising at least one coloring agent and at least one polyamide polymer chosen from the ethylenediamine/stearyl dimer tallate copolymer
US7008629Jul 22, 2002Mar 7, 2006L'ORéAL S.A.Compositions comprising at least one heteropolymer and fibers, and methods of using the same
US7011823Feb 27, 2004Mar 14, 2006L'oreal S.A.Method of making a mascara composition comprising a polyamide polymer and at least one inert filler
US7025953Jan 16, 2002Apr 11, 2006L'oreal S.A.Nail polish composition comprising a polymer
US7030985Dec 11, 2001Apr 18, 2006L'oréalColored transparent or translucent cosmetic composition
US7052681Jan 17, 2002May 30, 2006L'ORéAL S.A.Cosmetic composition containing a polymer and a fluoro oil
US7144582Oct 11, 2000Dec 5, 2006L'ORéAL S.A.Polyamide from oleic, linoleic, linolenic acid dimers and ethylenediamine, hexylenediamine, or phenylenediamine; and dye; wax-free cosmetics
US7276547Dec 12, 2000Oct 2, 2007L'oreal S.A.Compositions comprising heteropolymers and at least one oil-soluble polymers chosen from alkyl celluloses and alkylated guar gums
US7314612Dec 12, 2001Jan 1, 2008L'oreal S.A.Cosmetic compositions containing at least one heteropolymer and at least one gelling agent and methods of using the same
US7351418Nov 22, 2004Apr 1, 2008L'oreal S.A.Cosmetic composition comprising a polymer blend
US7410636Dec 11, 2001Aug 12, 2008L'oreal S.A.Cosmetic composition comprising a polymer and fibres
US7491749Dec 12, 2001Feb 17, 2009L'orealAt least one polyamide polymer in a cosmetic composition comprising at least one solid substance having a melting point of 45 degrees C. or greater
US7749524Dec 22, 2003Jul 6, 2010L'oreal S.A.Contain a structuring polymer (particularly a low molecular weight fatty alcohol-endcapped polyamide from a dimer acid), a liquid fatty phase, a silicone elastomer powdere.g., a polyorganosilsesquioxane, coated with a silicone resin, and a swelling agent, e.g., a dimethicone, for the powder
US8080257Dec 12, 2000Dec 20, 2011L'oreal S.A.Cosmetic compositions containing at least one hetero polymer and at least one film-forming silicone resin and methods of using
US8333956Nov 15, 2007Dec 18, 2012Color Access, Inc.Stable cosmetic emulsion with polyamide gelling agent
US8449870Jun 19, 2002May 28, 2013Color Access, Inc.Stable cosmetic emulsion with polyamide gelling agent
EP1174110A1 *Jul 16, 2001Jan 23, 2002L'orealCosmetic or pharmaceutical solid composition comprising bis-acyl-amides
WO1998027193A1 *Dec 9, 1997Jun 25, 1998Procter & GamblePersonal cleansing bar composition containing sodium lauroyl lactylate
WO2002005763A1 *Jul 16, 2001Jan 24, 2002Sylvie GenardCosmetic or pharmaceutical composition in solid form comprising bis-acyl-amides
WO2002056845A1 *Jan 17, 2002Jul 25, 2002Ferrari VeroniqueComposition structured in rigid form by a polymeric compound
Classifications
U.S. Classification514/789, 510/447, 510/141, 510/145
International ClassificationA61Q19/10, C11D3/18, A61K8/42, C11D1/00, C11D1/52, C11D1/02, C11D1/04, C11D1/38, C11D17/00, A61K8/31, A61K8/30
Cooperative ClassificationC11D3/18, A61K8/42, A61Q19/10, C11D1/04, C11D1/523, A61K8/31, C11D17/006
European ClassificationA61K8/31, C11D17/00H6, A61K8/42, C11D1/52D, C11D3/18, A61Q19/10