Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3858351 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 7, 1975
Filing dateOct 3, 1973
Priority dateOct 3, 1973
Publication numberUS 3858351 A, US 3858351A, US-A-3858351, US3858351 A, US3858351A
InventorsPorter Irwin C
Original AssigneeMattel Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Figure toy injury-simulating apparatus and method
US 3858351 A
Abstract
A plastic patch has a simulated skin blemish or injury on one surface beneath a first adhesive film. A second adhesive film is provided on the other surface for adherence to a figure toy. A simulated bandage has an adhesive coating on one surface and is applied to the figure toy in contact with the plastic patch which then adheres to the adhesive coating on the simulated bandage with more tenacity than to the figure toy so that the patch is automatically removed from the figure toy when the simulated bandage is removed, thereby simulating healing of the simulated skin blemish or injury by the simulated bandage.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Porter Jan.7, 1975 FIGURE/TOY INJURY-SIMULATING APPARATUS AND METHOD [75] Inventor: Irwin C. Porter, Quinter, Kans.

[73] Assignee: Mattel, Inc., Hawthorne, Calif.

[22] Filed: Oct. 3, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 403,235

Primary Examiner--Louis G. Mancene Assistant Examiner-Robert F. Cutting Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Max E. Shirk [5 7] ABSTRACT A plastic patch has a simulated skin blemish or injury on one surface beneath a first adhesive film. A second adhesive film is provided on the other surface for adherence to a figure toy. A simulated bandage has an adhesive coating on one surface and is applied to the figure toy in contact with the plastic patch which then adheres to the adhesive coating on the simulated bandage with more tenacity than to the figure toy so that the patch is automatically removed from the figure toy when the simulated bandage is removed, thereby simulating healing of the simulated skin blemish or injury by the simulated bandage.

2 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures Patented Jan. 7, 1975 xxxxxxvvx XI K XXX FIGURE TOY INJURY-SIMULATING APPARATUS AND METHOD BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The background of the invention will be set forth in two parts.

1. Field of the Invention The invention pertains generally to the field of figure toys and more particularly to injury-simulating apparatus and method for a figure toy.

2. Description of the Prior Art The prior art known to applicant is listed by way of illustration, but not of limitation, in separate communication to the United States Patent Office. The present invention exemplifies improvements over this prior art.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION An object of the present invention is to provide a new and useful apparatus for, and method of, simulating injuries and the healing thereof in figure toys.

According to the present invention, a figure toy, such as a doll or the like, may be provided with a number of skin-blemish or injury-simulating patches which may be in the form of decals having the skin blemish or injurysimulating feature printed on one surface beneath a first adhesive film. A second adhesive film is provided on the other surface for adherence to the doll.

A simulated bandage may then be applied to the doll in contact with the first adhesive film on the patch. The simulated bandage includes an adhesive coating which adheres to the doll and to the first adhesive film on the patch so that the patch will adhere to the adhesive coating on the simulated bandage with more tenacity than to the doll. When the simulated bandage is removed,

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of a figure toy having an apparatus constituting a presently preferred embodiment of the invention in position thereon;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged, plan view of a simulated bandage portion of the apparatus of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an exploded perspective view of the simulated bandage of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged perspective view, with parts broken away to show internal construction, of an injury-simulating patch portion of the apparatus of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 5 is a bottom view of the simulated bandage of FIG. 2 and the injury-simulating patch of FIG. 4 after they have been removed from the figure toy of FIG. 1.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring again to the drawings, a figure toy injurysimulating apparatus constituting a presently preferred embodiment of the invention, generally designated I0, includes a figure toy 12 having a torso 14, a head 16, a pair of arms 18, 20 and a pair of legs 22, 24.

Apparatus 10 also includes a skin-blemish-simulating or injury-simulating patch 26 (FIG. 4) having an upper surface 28 upon which a simulated skin blemish or injury 30 is provided. Upper surface 28 is covered by a first adhesive film 32 which, in turn, is covered by a readily-removable protective film .34. Patch 26 also includes a lower surface 36 (FIG. 5) provided with a second adhesive film 38 for adhering patch 26 to figure toy 12 after a readily-removable protective film 39 is removed, as shown at 26 in FIG. 1 for leg 22 wherein patch 26 simulates an injury thereto. Protective film 34 may then be removed and a simulated bandage 40 (FIGS. 2 and 3) may be placed on leg 22 over patch 26 in contact therewith.

Simulated bandage 40 includes a body portion 42 having a lower surface 44 (FIGS. 3 and 5) and an upper surface 46 (FIG. 1). Lower surface 44 is provided with an adhesive film 48 which may be covered by a readilyremovable protective film 50 having overlapping portions 52, 54. When simulated bandage 40 is placed on figure toy 12 with adhesive film 48 in contact with figure toy 12 and patch 26, the first adhesive film 32 on patch 26 will adhere to the adhesive film 48 with more tenacity than the second adhesive film 38 on patch 26 adheres to figure toy 12 so that patch 26 will adhere to bandage 40, as shown in FIG. 5, when bandage 40 is removed from figure toy 12. This simulates healing of the simulated skin blemish or injury by bandage 40.

As will be apparent to those skilled in the art, a number of different materials may be used for the patch 26 and the bandage 40. For example, the body portion of patch 26 may be made from a suitable vinyl material having the same basic color as figure toy 12 with the simulated injury being printed thereon in a contrasting color. The body portion 42 of bandage 40 may also be made from a suitable vinyl material and the adhesive films 32', 38 and 48 may comprise any suitable pressure sensitive adhesive including water-based, highmolecular-weight, pressure-sensitive acrylic latexes wherein rewetting causes a complete loss of tack, which is regained completely after drying so that patch 26 and bandage 40 may be washed when they lose their tackiness due to dirt accumulation. Protective coverings 34 and 50 may be made from wax paper or other material having a low coefficient of friction.

According to the method of the present invention, an injury to a figure toy and the subsequent healing thereof may be simulated by applying an adhesive coated, injury-simulating patch to a figure toy, applying an adhesive-coated simulated bandage to the figure toy over the injury-simulating patch and in contact therewith in such a manner that the patch will adhere to the adhesive coating on the simulated bandage and removing the simulated bandage with the injury-simulating patch adhered thereto, thereby simulating healing of the simulated injury by the simulated bandage.

While the particular apparatus and method herein shown and described in detail are fully capable of attaining the objects and providing the advantages hereinbefore stated, it is to be understood that they are merely illustrative of the presently preferred embodiments of the invention and that no limitations are intended to the details of construction or design herein shown other than as defined in the appended claims, which form a part of this disclosure. Wherever the term means is employed in these claims, this term is to be interpreted as defining the corresponding structure illustrated and described in the specification or the equivalent of the same.

What is claimed is:

l. A method of simulating an injury on a figure toy and the subsequent healing of the injury comprising the steps of:

adhering an adhesive-coated, injury-simulating patch to said figure toy;

adhering an adhesive-coated simulated bandage to said figure toy and to and over said injurysimulating patch with greater adhesive force than that with which said patch is adhered to said figure toy; and thereafter removing said simulated bandage from said figure toy, said injury-simulating patch adhering to said figure toy less tenaciously than to said simulated bandage, whereby said injury-simulating patch will adhere to said simulated bandage and will be removed from said figure toy when said simulated bandage is removed.

2. In combination with a figure toy, an injurysimulating apparatus comprising:

an adhesive-coated, injury-simulating patch releasably adhered to said figure toy; and

an adhesive-coated simulated bandage releasably adhered to said figure toy over and in contact with said patch, said patch adhering to the adhesive coating on said simulated bandage with greater adhesive force than that with which it adheres to said figure toy.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2781611 *Nov 24, 1953Feb 19, 1957Clark Dorothy SDoll for selectively exhibiting symptoms of sickness
US2959891 *Apr 14, 1959Nov 15, 1960Alexander Doll Company IncDoll
US3571947 *Oct 1, 1968Mar 23, 1971Lade James J DeMeans for identifying skin blemishes
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4030235 *Feb 17, 1976Jun 21, 1977Marvin Glass & AssociatesToy play kit
US4944681 *Jan 11, 1989Jul 31, 1990Burgio Paul APlush toy with ear system for displaying normal and abnormal eardrums
US5096424 *May 18, 1990Mar 17, 1992Chuckles & Co.Training apparatus and method for handling newborn infants
US5224863 *Jul 17, 1991Jul 6, 1993Lauer Toys IncorporatedFilling assembly for doll with liquid reservoir
US5314339 *Mar 29, 1993May 24, 1994Marivel AponteEducational medical mannequin
US5494472 *Feb 10, 1995Feb 27, 1996Levy; Richard C.Toy figures with rupturable microcapsules for simulated bleeding
US5720502 *Nov 8, 1996Feb 24, 1998Cain; John R.Pain location and intensity communication apparatus and method
US5853293 *Apr 7, 1997Dec 29, 1998Legacy Products, Inc.Medical teaching aid
US5984368 *Feb 23, 1998Nov 16, 1999Quality Medical Communications, Inc.Patient condition and pain location and intensity communication apparatus and method
US6077083 *Mar 22, 1999Jun 20, 2000Children's Hospital Of PhiladelphiaDoll for instruction of sickle cell disease clinical observations
US6241525Sep 28, 1999Jun 5, 2001Basf CorporationPressure ulcer wound care models, methods and kits
US7244124 *Aug 7, 2003Jul 17, 2007Barbara Gibson MerrillMethod and device for facilitating energy psychology or tapping
US7247027Jul 12, 2004Jul 24, 2007Hoster Jr WilliamMass casualty, disaster training inflatable manikin
WO1987006487A1 *Jul 21, 1986Nov 5, 1987Vladimir SirotaToy
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/296, 434/267
International ClassificationA63H3/36, A63H3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H3/36
European ClassificationA63H3/36