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Publication numberUS3858595 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 7, 1975
Filing dateJan 19, 1973
Priority dateJan 19, 1973
Publication numberUS 3858595 A, US 3858595A, US-A-3858595, US3858595 A, US3858595A
InventorsLund Harold H, Schultz Harry D
Original AssigneeChampion Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Utensil washing apparatus
US 3858595 A
Abstract
A machine for washing dishes as well as pots and pans includes a rack contacting sensor mechanism for determining whether a dish rack or a pots and pans rack is positioned within the machine. The sensor mechanism distinguishes between the sizes or types of the dish racks and pots and pans racks, and through an electrical circuit automatically adjusts the washer spray pressure depending upon the type of rack located in the machine.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Schultz et a1.

1 51 Jan.7, 1975 1 UTENSIL WASHING APPARATUS [75] Inventors: Barry D. Schultz; Harold H. Lund,

both of Winston-Salem, N.C.

[73] Assignee: Champion lndustries,lnc.,

Winston-Salem, N.C.

22 Filed: Jan. 19, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 325,151

[52] U.S. C1. 134/47, 134/57 D [51] Int. Cl B08b 3/02 [58] Field of Search 134/46, 47, 56 R, 56 D,

134/57 R, 57 D, 57 DL Germany 134/57 D Primary ExaminerRohert L. Blcutgc [57] ABSTRACT A machine for washing dishes as well as pots and pans includes a rack contacting sensor mechanism for determining whether a dish rack or a pots and pans rack is positioned within the machine. The sensor mechanism distinguishes between the sizes or types of the dish racks and pots and pans racks, and through an electrical circuit automatically adjusts the washer spray pressure depending upon the type of rack 10- 9 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS cated in the machine. 2,644,473 7/1953 Fox et a1 134/46 X 3,014,488 12/1961 Seaman 134/46 1'} l l l 30 i y -1 i 433" is), 1 .1 I g1!) 1! PATENTEUJAN H915 5.858595 sum 10F 5 FIG.3

In WW PATENTED JAN 71975 SHEET 3 [IF 3 UTENSIL WASHING APPARATUS BACKGROUND, BRIEF SUMMARY AND OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION In conventional door-type dishwashing machines, a rack filled with dishes may be manually loaded into the machine. The machine doors normally are manually raised and lowered before and after each automatically timed cycle for wash and rinse of the dishes. The standard liquid spray pressure for dishwashing is restricted to approximately 8-9 psi to prevent the dishes from being dislodged and thrown about in the washing chamber. A conventional pot and pan washer normally is somewhat larger than the dishwasher and is adapted to receive a pots and pans rack which is normally larger than the conventional dish rack. The pots and pans are cleaned during automatically timed wash and rinse stages. However, for the pots and pans washer fluid spray pressures in the range of -35 psi are required for the proper stripping action needed to remove baked-on types of soil.

Therefore, the functions of the two machines, dishwasher and pots and pans washer, are substantially identical.

The present invention relates generally to utensil washers and more particularly to a new and improved machine for washing dishes and pots and pans. The machine incorporates a means for providing a relatively low pressure spray for washing dishes and a relatively high pressure for washing pots and pans. Such means for providing relatively high and low spray pressures may include a two speed pump motor, variable or multiple orifices, variable or multiple pressure regulators, etc., controlled responsive to a signal or signals depending upon the particular type of rack being utilized. Sensor means determine the type of the utensil rack placed in the machine, that is, whether the rack is a pots and pans rack or a dish rack, and through suitable signal means controls the machine to operate at the compatible pressure.

One of the primary objects of the invention is the provision of a new and improved machine for washing racks of dishes as well as racks of pots and pans.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a utensil washer which detects the type of utensil racks placed therein and automatically adjusts the cleaning fluid spray pressures.

A further object of the invention is the provision of a combination pot and pan washer and dish washer which is economical and durable in use.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent when considered in view of the following detailed description.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a schematic front elevational view of the new and improved combination dish and pot and pan washer of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a schematic, side elevational view of the combination washer of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a schematic, top plan view of the combination washer of FIG. I, and illustrating table means positioned at each side of the washer;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged, fragmentary, schematic, top plan view of the combination washer, with the parts removed. and illustating the mechanism for sensing the size of the utensil rack positioned within the washer;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged, fragmentary, schematic, front elevational view of the utensil rack size sensing means; and

FIG. 6 is a schematic wiring diagram of a conventional utensil washer, and incorporating the sensing elements and electrical circuitry for adjusting the speed of a motor-pump to vary the liquid cleaning spray pressure directed upon the utensils.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Referring to the drawing and particularly to FIGS. 1-3, the combination utensil washer 10 includes a base 12, support frame I4, and a housing or casing I6 defining a washing and rinsing area 18. The housing I6 includes a vertically movable door or hood assembly 20 that may be raised or lowered by means of one or more handles 22. Upon displacement, the door or hood assembly 20 may be guided by post or rails and a counterbalance system may be provided for facilitating raising and lowering of the assembly 20 as disclosed, for example, in US. Pat. Nos. 2,782,793 and l,737,693.

An openwork table or frame 24 and guide rails 26, defining a track assembly 28 for a utensil rack, is positioned within the washing and rinsing area 18. Tables 30 and 32 are provided at opposite sides of the utensil washer 10 at the same level as the track assembly 28. Racks of soiled dishes or pots and pans may be slid from one table at one side of the machine 10 into the chamber area 18 for cleaning and the same rack may be slid onto the opposite table after having been washed and rinsed. The racks may be of open wire or other suitable types of construction for facilitating application of the wash water and rinse water to the utensils.

The wash water is applied from above and below the rack of utensils in the area 18 by upper and lower sets of rotatable arms 34, 36. The two-speed pump motor 38 is connected to a suitable source for supplying water to the arms 34, 36 to provide a spray of the prescribed pressure to clean the particular utensils positioned within the cleaning area 18. The rinse water may be directed through the arms 34, 36 or through additional suitable spray nozzles, not shown, positioned above and below the utensil rack in the chamber 18.

While the invention has been disclosed utilizing a two-speed motor pump for varying the spray pressures, it is to be noted that other suitable means may be provided for varying the spray pressures, such as pressure regulators, etc.

Conventional wash racks for receiving pots and pans normally are larger than the racks for receiving dishes. Referring to FIGS. 3-5, there is illustrated a sensor arrangement that may or may not be actuated by a wash rack depending upon the particular size of wash rack placed in the machine. While the sensor arrangement may include photocells. fluid flow detectors, etc., the sensor arrangement illustrated includes a pair of switch assemblies 40, 42 each including rack contact members 44, spaced apart a prescribed distance y, FIG. 4, within the area 18 and positioned just above the track assembly 28. The distance y between the contact members 44 of the switch assemblies 40, 42 is greater than the width or length x of a dish rack 46 while the length z of the pots and pans rack 48 is large enough to contact both of the switch assembly contact members 44 when properly positioned within the machine. For example, the dish rack 46 may be approximately 20 inches square.

the pots and pans rack 48 may be approximately 24 inches by 28 inches, and the distance between contact members 44 may be approximately 22 inches. However, it is to be understood that the precise rack sizes and the distance between members 44 may vary, as long as only one size of rack will actuate both switch assemblies 40, 42 simultaneously.

Each switch assembly 40 and 42 includes a lever or contact member 44 secured to a generally L-shaped rod 52 which is connected to the lever 54 of a microswitch 50. The rod 52 is supported for rotation in a bracket 56 and collars 58 such that upon displacement by a rack, the lever 54 and consequently the switch 50 is actuated. The switch 50 may be supported by a bracket 60. I

FIG. 6 illustrates conventional circuitry for a utensil washer, and also includes the rack actuated switches 50 for controlling the speed of the pump motor 38, depending upon the size of rack positioned within the machine 10, and various timers for the wash and rinse cycles. The switches 50, as shown by FIG. 6, are in the positions they would assume when the larger of the racks, rack 48, is located in the machine chamber and contacting both switch assemblies 40, 42.

With the washer controls on automatic operation, the various controls and circuitry operate in the following manner. With a utensil rack placed in the chamber or area 18, the hood assembly is closed and a safety door switch 62 is actuated so'that the circuitry will function. With a 24 inch by 28 inch pots and pans rack 48 in the machine, both of the switches 50 which are in series are actuated by the rack and the normally opened switches 50 are closed, as shown by FIG. 6, for energizing through line 63 the fast side F of the twospeed motor starter 64 which controls the two-speed motor-pump 38. The motor-pump 38 operates at a relatively high rpm, for example, 3450 rpm, to provide within the range of approximately -40 psi cleaning fluid spray pressure. The higher pressure stripping sprays are required since the usual burned on soil on the surfaces of the pots and pans, as from the cooking process, is much harder to remove than the soil found on dishes. If a rack of dishes were to be subjected to these high velocity sprays they would be broken. The timer 66 and timer 68 regulate the pots and pans wash cycle and rinse cycle, respectively. After completion of the rinse cycle, the hood assembly 20 is raised and the pots and pans rack 48 is removed to table or 32.

When a smaller dish rack 46, for example 20 inches by 20 inches, is placed within the chamber 18, neither of the switches 50 or only one of the switches is actuated at the same time due to the spacing y between the switches regardless of how the smaller dish rack 46 is placed within the machine 10. Therefore, no contact is made through the series connected switches 50 to the fast side F of the starter 64. Instead, the two normally closed sides of the switches 50, being connected in parallel, will energize through line 70 the slow side S of the motor starter 64. Therefore, the pump motor 38 is driven at a lower rpm, for example, 1725 rpm, which results in dish wash spray pressures within the range of approximately 7-10 psi to prevent dislodgement and throwing around of the dishes within the chamber or area 18. The dish wash and rinse cycle is controlled by a timer 72. I

The circuitry also includes a standard start and stop switch arrangement 74, a manual-automatic, washrinse switch 76 which simply permits a manual override of the automatic circuitry, and various lamps. Also, relays are connected to the various timers for quick starts and feature a simple holding circuit. A selector switch 78 adapted to be set for dishes or pots and pans operation, depending upon the type of ware to be cleaned, is utilized in conjunction with the manual position of switch 76.

While the invention has been described with a pair of switches for sensing the difference between sizes of different types of racks, a single switch may be utilized when sensing racks of various configurations.

We claim:

1. A utensil washer for cleaning racks of dishes as well as racks of pots and pans comprising; a housing defining a utensil cleaning chamber, said chamber adapted to receive either a utensil rack of a first type for cleaning dishes or a utensil rack of a second type for cleaning pots and pans, spraying mechanism within said chamber adapted to have cleaning fluid conducted therethrough from a supply source, variable fluid pressure means for directing the cleaning fluid through said spraying mechanism into said chamberat a first prescribed pressure when a dish rack of a first type is within said chamber and at a second prescribed pressure when a pot and pan rack of a second type is within said chamber, and means, including, rack contacting sensor means, for automatically determining the type of rack within said chamber and adjusting said fluid pressure means to direct cleaning fluid through said spraying mechanism at a prescribed pressure corresponding to the type of rack within said chamber.

2. A utensil washer as recited in claim 1, wherein said fluid pressure means includes a variable speed motorpump means which operates at a first speed for forcing cleaning fluid through said spraying mechanism at a relatively low pressure when washing dishes, and operates at a second speed for forcing cleaning fluid through said spraying mechanism at a relatively high pressure when washing pots and pans.

3. A utensil washer as recited in claim 2, wherein said relatively low pressure is within the range of 7-'l0 psi and the relatively high pressure is within the range of 25-40 psi.

4. A utensil washer as recited in claim 1, wherein said sensor means is positioned within said chamber;

5. A utensil washer as recited in claim 1, wherein said sensor means includes a pair of switches.

6. A utensil washer as recited in claim 5, wherein both switches of said pair of switches are positioned so as to be actuated simultaneously by only one type of said first and said second types of racks.

ated by a rack and at a second speed when only one switch or neither of the pair of switches are actuated.

9. A utensil washer as recited in claim 1, wherein said fluid pressure means includes a variable speed motorpump, and said sensor means includes a switching mechanism for controlling said motor-pump speed responsive to the type of utensil rack within said chamber.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2644473 *May 16, 1950Jul 7, 1953Hobart Mfg CoDishwasher
US3014488 *Aug 5, 1958Dec 26, 1961Toledo Scale CorpDishwasher
US3279481 *Aug 31, 1964Oct 18, 1966Gen Motors CorpDishwasher with speed control means
US3760825 *May 19, 1970Sep 25, 1973Sybron CorpWashing machine transfer valve
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4126485 *May 19, 1977Nov 21, 1978Industrial Washing Machine CorporationMachine for cleaning pots and pans
US4134413 *Feb 13, 1978Jan 16, 1979Noren Tore HTandem rack dishwashing machine with time-controlled washing and rinsing cycles
US5131419 *May 21, 1990Jul 21, 1992Roberts Donald EMulti-function warewashing machine
US5601100 *Oct 26, 1994Feb 11, 1997Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki KaishaWashing apparatus
US7021322 *Dec 25, 2003Apr 4, 2006Premark Feg L.L.C.Warewash machine with wrap-around hood and multi-position splash guard, and drip flange for warewash machine
US8636851 *Apr 21, 2005Jan 28, 2014Bsh Bosch Und Siemens Hausgeraete GmbhDishwasher comprising automatically cleaning washing liquid lines
US8795437Jan 23, 2008Aug 5, 2014Gs Development AbDishwasher with basket detecting device
US20040079400 *Oct 25, 2002Apr 29, 2004Young Raymond A.Dishwasher having a variable speed circulation pump controlled responsive to sensed turbidity
US20050145269 *Dec 25, 2003Jul 7, 2005Kramer Steven H.Warewash machine with wrap-around hood and multi-position splash guard, and drip flange for warewash machine
CN102223833BNov 13, 2009Dec 11, 2013伊莱克斯家用产品公司Safety arrangement for a dishwasher
DE19959686A1 *Dec 10, 1999Jun 13, 2001Bsh Bosch Siemens HausgeraeteGeschirrspülmaschine mit einem Gewichtserfassungsmittel
EP0650692A1 *Oct 28, 1994May 3, 1995Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki KaishaWashing apparatus
EP0962183A1 *Apr 9, 1999Dec 8, 1999AEG Hausgeräte GmbHDishwasher with at least one rack and operating process
WO2005067461A2 *Oct 21, 2004Jul 28, 2005Illinois Tool WorksWarewash machine with wrap-around hood and multi-position splash guard, and drip flange for warwash machine
WO2008090180A1 *Jan 23, 2008Jul 31, 2008Gs Dev AbDishwasher with basket detecting device
WO2010059515A1 *Nov 13, 2009May 27, 2010Electrolux Home Products, Inc.Safety arrangement for a dishwasher
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/47, 134/57.00D
International ClassificationA47L15/42
Cooperative ClassificationA47L15/4289, A47L15/4295, A47L15/50, A47L15/0081
European ClassificationA47L15/50, A47L15/00E6, A47L15/42P, A47L15/42V