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Publication numberUS3858738 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 7, 1975
Filing dateMar 14, 1973
Priority dateMar 4, 1970
Publication numberUS 3858738 A, US 3858738A, US-A-3858738, US3858738 A, US3858738A
InventorsEric Kenneth Hurst
Original AssigneeEric Kenneth Hurst, Woolf Griptight Ltd Lewis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Infants feeding bottles
US 3858738 A
Abstract
An infant's disposable feeding bottle comprising a container having an outlet surrounded by a seating on which is engaged a resilient teat which in turn is secured in place by a securing ring, the teat being enclosed within a cap and having frictionally engaged within it a closure member, there being sealing engagement between the cap, teat and closure member to prevent contamination of the contents with removal of the closure member being achieved by manipulation of the cap.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 UNITED STATES PATENTS 11/1954 White 215/11R Hurst 1 1 Jan. 7, 1975 [5 INFANTS FEEDING BOTTLES 2.793.776 5/1957 Lipari 1. 215/6 v1761 Invent Eric Kenneth Hurst/F1915, 19 33'3333232 11/133,? Eiiiri'TIIIII 1111351211 E Lowndes Square, London 6 3,253,726 5/1966 Meierhoefer 215/11 R England 3,358,864 12/1967 Meierhoefer v 215/11 C 3,516,564 6/1970 Pohlenz 215/11 C [22] 1973 3,519,157 7/1970 Meierhoefer 215/11 c 121| Appl. No.: 341,116

Rdated 115 Application Data Primary Examiner-William 1. Price [63] Continuation of Ser. NO. 118,924, Feb. 25, 1971, ASA/am Exammeristephen Marcus abandoned Attorney, Agent, or F1rmHolman & Stern [30] Foreign Application Priority Data [57] ABSTRACT Mar. 4, 1970 Great Britain 10529/70 Sept. 19,1970 Great Britain 44739/70 An infants disposable feeding bottle Compnsing a container having an outlet surrounded by a seating on [52] US, Cl U 215/11 C, 206/221 215/1)1(] 8 which is engaged a resilient teat which in turn is se- 222/213 cured in place by a securing ring, the teat being en- 1511 1111.01. A6lj 9/00 closed within a p and having frictionally engaged [58] Field f S h 215/11 R 11 B 11 C 11 1), within it a closure member, there being sealing en- 215/6, DIG. 8; 128/252; 206/47 A; 99/171 gagement between the cap, teat and closure member D; 222/213 to 12 1 v11t999t2n1i99911 9 L 9 ,p m s, w th "re.- moval of the closure member being achieved by ma- [56] References Cited nipulatio" of the l 1 Claim, 9 Drawing Figures PATENTEDJAN H915 3,858,738

' sum 1 or 4 INVENTOR fit 0%(4/Mf ATTORNEYS PATENTEUJAN H975 saw REF" 4 INVENFOR'- $26 %/w ATTORNEYS PATENTEU JAN 71975 SHEET 4 UF 4.

INVENTOR %W%%/W/ ATTORNEYS INFANTS FEEDING BOTTLES This application is a continuation of application Ser. No. 118,924, filed Feb. 25, 1971, now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION PRIOR ART Prefilled and often sterilized disposable infants feeding bottles have been proposed and used in which the contents of the container and the interior of the teat are separated from one another before use. This expedient is adopted since in the absence of a closure element, there would be a tendency for the liquid to thereby dry leading to clogging and to an increased risk of deterioration of the contents of the bottle, and of the teat.

This requirement has commonly been met by providing separate seals on the container top and on a package containing the teat and its holder. These require to be removed separately before the bottle is ready for use. This procedure increases the risk of contamination of the contents as well as of the teat interior, as well as resulting in a device which is relatively costly to manufacture.

Sometimes the bottle and teat assembly are separately packaged and are only fitted together immediately prior to use and after the individual packaging has been removed. With such devices it has been unpracticable and indeed ineffective to sterilize the container and the teat with its holder together. On the contrary this has normally been carried out as separate operations, thus further increasing manufacturing and filling costs.

It has also been proposed to arrange for the teat to be permanently fixed to the container and for their interiors to be separated by a closure member which is displaced by some externally applied force. Such forces have involved undesirable distortion of the teat. In other cases, the closure member has been difficult to dislodge when it is required to do so.

OBJECT AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The object of this invention is to provide a disposable infants feeding bottle in which, not only is the contents of the bottle kept separate from the interior of the teat before use, but also the risk of contamination during preparation for use is minimized by avoiding the necessity for separation of the parts during such preparation. Furthermore, the opening of the interior of the teat to the interior of the container can be simply and speedily carried out.

According to the present invention, an infant's feeding bottle comprises a bottle for liquid, having an outlet opening surrounded by a seating, a resilient teat with an outlet orifice, the teat having a flange portion engaging the seating and secured on the container to create a seal to contain the liquid in the container, a removable teat cap enclosing the teat, the cap having an internal annular portion engaging a further portion of the teat to create a further seal for the enclosure for the teat, and closure means sealing against communication between the inerior of the container and the interior of the teat, said closure means being frictionally engaged in the interior of the teat and being displaceable by manipulation of the teat cap to remove the sealing means from its sealing position, such manipulation being carried out with the teat cap covering the teat.

The invention will now be described by way of example with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is an enlarged cross-sectional view of the top of a feeding bottle in the packed condition and constructed in accordance with the invention,

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of the feeding bottle top in FIG. 1 in a partially opened condition,

FIG. 3 shows the same bottle top in a further position during the opening sequence,

FIG. 4 is a view of the feeding bottle top in open condition, prepared for use,

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of the top of an alternative form of feeding bottle in accordance with the invention,

FIG. 6 is a similar view of a further alternative construction, and

FIGS. 7, 8 and 9 are diagrammatic views of still further alternative constructions.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Referring to the construction shown in FIGS. 1 to 4, there is provided an infants feeding bottle comprising a bottle 10 for liquid feed having an outlet opening 11 surrounded by a flat seating surface 12. Adjacent to the outlet opening 11 is a neck 13 which provides a narrower opening than the opening 11. The neck 13 is bounded, on its side, nearer to the surface 12, with a frusto conical surface 14, while at the end of this surface there is a cylindrical surface 15.

The flat surface 12 forms a seating for a flange 16 of a resilient teat 17. To secure the teat 17 to the bottle 10, a securing ring 18 engaging over the teat flange 16 is provided. This ring 18 is rolled onto the frusto conical surface 14 of the bottle.

, The teat 17 has a bulbous end which is apertured at 18 in the usual manner of such devices. Between the flange 16 and the bulbous end, the teat is distorted to form a neck at 19 and has an internal annular projection 21 formed adjacent the narrowest part of the neck 19. Joining the neck 19 with the flange 12 is a cylindrical portion 22 which is, in FIG. 4, shown in its free, unstressed condition.

Enclosing the teat 17 is a cap 23. The cap 23 has a stepped open end comprising a skirt portion 24 encompassing the securing ring 18 and a double stepped portion 25. FIG. 1 shows the cap skirt portion 24 folded round at its lower end, as shown, onto the portion of the securing ring 18 which lies on the surface 14 of the bottle. Such engagement retains the cap 23 on the bottle 10.

When the cap 23 is in the position illustrated in FIG. 1, the inner annular step of its portion 25 is in frictional engagement with the external surface of the cylindrical portion 22 of the teat 17 causing this portioin to become folded.

Within the teat and bottle opening is a closure member 26, the purpose of which is to prevent access between the interior of the bottle and the interior of the teat. This closure member 26 is a generally cylindrical cup shaped part having its open end presented towards the bottle interior. The rim at the open end is thickened to provide an external peripheral frusto conical portion 27. The external edge of the closed end of the part is radiused at 28. The mean diameter of the frusto conical portion 27 is approximately equal to the diameter of the opening 11 of the bottle so that the closure member lodges in this opening to seal it. Both the bottle 10 and the closure member 26 are, however, made from material which provides sufficient resilience to allow the closure member to be pushed completely through the opening 11, as will be described. There is further sealing engagement between the external cylindrical surface of the closure member 26 and the interior of the teat at a region adjacent to the stepped portion of the cap 23. Indeed such engagement is created by pressure of the cap 23 on the teat cylindrical portion 22 which is thus deformed, as described, so that, in turn, it engages the closure member 26.

The parts have, for the most part been described in their positions illustrated in FIG. 1. This is the condition of the device when it is stored. When it is to be made ready for use, however, certain operations must be carried out in sequence and FIGS. 2, 3 and 4 illustrate the progressive condition of the device to the fully open and prepared condition of FIG. 4.

The first step is to pull the cap 23 upwards to release its skirt portion 24 from engagement around the securing ring 18. The material of the cap is such as to allow the necessary fracture or expansion merely by hand applied force. Removal to the position illustrated in FIG. 2 will allow the resilient teat to revert to its unstressed position. This will release the seal between the cap 23 and the teat 17, as well as releasing that b'etween the interior of the teat and the closure member 26.

The next operation is to drive the cap downwards to the original position as shown in FIG. 3. Because the cap diameter, excluding its flange, is less than that of the cylindrical portion 22 of the teat, this portion 22 will be folded or buckled as illustrated. Reliance is also placed upon the frictional contact between the stepped portion 25 of the cap and the external surface of the teat. The choice of materials for these parts is governed by such requirements. The internal projection 21 of the teat engages the end of the closure member 26 and causes it to be pushed through the opening 11 in the bottle 10, thus allowing liquid in the bottle to reach the interior of the teat.

Immediately before use, the cap 23 is removed and discarded.

FIG. 4 shows the teat in its unstressed condition and the closure member 26 occupying the space in the bottle between the opening 11 and the neck 13. It is prevented, by its size, from entering the bottle interior through the neck 13. The shape and size of the closure member as well as the space it occupies, are chosen to prevent the closure member from lodging in a position in which it will block the flow of liquid between the interior of the bottle and the interior of the teat.

The bottle is intended to be discarded after use and no provision is made for removal and subsequent replacement of the teat.

The sequence of assembly of the parts comprises inserting the teat 17 into the securing ring 18, inserting this into the cap 23, placing the closure member 26 into the teat interior and finally mounting this assembly onto the prefilled bottle 10, ensuring correct engagement of the closure member in the opening 11 of the bottle, and then rolling or otherwise deforming the skirt portion 24 of the cap 23 and the securing ring depending edge into engagement with the frusto conical surface 14 of the bottle 10. Plastic materials are generally preferred for the construction of the cap and securing ring, but metal or other suitable material or any combination of these may be used.

The feeding bottle is preferably sterlized after assembly by a heating process.

In FIG. 5 there is shown an alternative form of feeding bottle comprising a bottle 30 for liquid feed, and preferably formed from a rigid self-supporting plastic material.

The bottle 10 has an opening 31 and surrounding this is a conical external surface 32. An annular groove 33 is formed in the surface 32. Engaging the open top of the container 30 is a resilient teat 34, teat covering cap 35, closure member 36 and securing ring 37 which are assembled together before being placed on the bottle in similar manner to the construction previously described. The teat 34 is provided at its end with one or more outlet holes (not illustrated). The teat has a conical flange 38 formed to engage with the corresponding conical surface 32 of the bottle 30. The teat 34 also has a step providing a flat annular portion 39.

The teat flange 38 is held against the surface 32 of the container by the securing ring 37 which is of generally frusto conical form having internal annular beads 41; 42 at its wider and narrower ends respectively. The bead 41 at the wider end engages the annular groove 33 in the bottle 30.

The cap 35 is domed and forms an enclosure within which the teat 34 is disposed. There is not necessarily contact between the domed end of the teat and the cap 35. The open end of the cap 35 is provided with a lip 43 which is engaged under the bead 42 of the securing ring 37.

Within the teat open end is disposed the closure member 36 which is in the form of a short flanged cylindrical cup. The flange 44 of this closure member 36 engages under the flat annular portion 39 of the teat 34. The external cylindrical surface of the closure member 36 engages with a corresponding cylindrical internal surface of the teat. Such surface is formed on a portion of the teat which is engaged externally with an internal surface of the cap 35 adjacent to its lip 43. The cap, closure member and securing ring are preferably formed from a rigid but resilient plastic material. As shown, the cap is provided with an inwardly directed shallow annular enlargement 45 so that sealing engagement between the cap, teat and closure member in the required region is achieved.

A further seal is provided by the lip 43 of the cap which engages the flat annular surface 39 of the teat, this being internally supported by the flange 44 of the closure member 36.

A still further seal is provided by the securing ring 37, the teat flange 38 and the surface 32 of the bottle 30.

Furthermore, the closure member 36 forms a seal separating the contents of the bottle 30 from the interior of the teat 34. The closure member 36 is held within the teat by frictional engagement with the teat and will not readily become dislodged during transit and storage of the feeding bottle. The closure member moreover, serves to retain all the parts of the assembly prior to the fitting of this assembly to the container.

The closure member 36, as illustrated in FIG. 5, has a hole 46 in its cylindrical wall. The wall in this region is also locally fattened. This arrangement serves as a valve whereby air from the interior of the teat can enter the interior of the container. This movement of air will only occur if there is a substantial pressure differential between the'two zones of the feeding bottle, since the flexible teat will normally close the hole 46.

Circumstances in which a pressuredifferential can build up include sterization processes involving heating. It may, however, be unnecessary to make any provision for such air transference.

When the feeding bottle, which is prefilled and sterilized is required for use, the cap 35 is struck on its domed end so that its lip 43 transmits a force to the closure 36, causing it to be dislodged into the interior of the container, thus allowing liquid to enter the interior of the teat 34.

The cap 35 is now removed and discarded, and the bottle is ready for use. When the bottle has been emptied it too may be discarded.

FIG. 6 shows a construction which is similar to FIG. 5 but the closure member is in two parts 47, 48 to define an enclosure. The part 47 is cup shaped and the part 48 is a flat disc secured to the open end of the cup part 47. The bend between them, however, is weak. They may be alternatively connected together by means of frictionally engaging formations.

The'enclosure formed within, the composite closure member can contain an additive substance indicated generally at 49, such additive substance being liquid, solid or gaseous. The cap 35 has an integral external annular bead 51 which, when the bottle is assembled, is adjacent the position of the closed end of the cup part 47.

Like that in FIG. 5, the composite closure member forms a seal separating the contents of the bottle 30 from the interior of the teat 34 and is held by frictional engagement in the teat and will not readily become dislodged during transit or storage of the bottle.

When the feeding bottle is required for use, the cap 35 is struck on its domed end so that its lip 43 transmits a force to the part 48 of the composite closure member. This is sufficient to dislodge this part so that the contents of the enclosure formed by the composite closure member can discharge into the interior of the bottle to mix with the contents of the bottle. This operation may conveniently be carried out before the bottle is to be used, but in some circumstances, and depending upon the nature of the additive substance, it may be desirable that this operation be delayed until almost immediately before the bottle is to be used.

In this condition the interior of the teat is still sealed from the interior of the bottle and the cap 35 is still in place to protect the teat 34 from external contamination.

When it is required to use the bottle the cap 35 is depressed still further until the bead 51 on the cap engages the retaining ring 37. There will be a squeezing action applied to the cup part 47 of the closure member through the teat, thus dislodging the part 47 and causing it to fall into the interior of the container 10. The contents of the container can now reach the interior of the teat.

FIG. 7 shows an alternative construction in which a teat 52 within a cap 53 has, within it, a solid stepped closure member 54. A securing ring which is provided is not shown.

In FIG. 8, a solid, but elongated, closure member 55 is provided within a teat 56 which is itself enclosed within a cap 57. The closure member 55 has an enlargement 58 at its end enclosed within the domed end of the teat 56. To dislodge the closure member 55, the end of the teat must be struck. This is carried out by crushing the end of the cap 57.

FIG. 9 illustrates a construction having a necked teat 59. Within the teat 59 is a hollow stepped tubular closure member 61, the wider end engaging in the open end of the teat and the narrower end being closed and extending almost to the domed end of the teat 59. The closure member 61 is removed in similar manner to that of FIG. 8. A cap 62 surrounds the teat 59.

Frictional engagement of the cap on the outside of the teat can be employed, no provision being made for the retention of the cap other than by such frictional engagement. However, interengaging formations on the cap and teat may be used to resist relative movement between them. It is necessary to provide means whereby manipulation of the cap dislodges the closure member within the teat without the need to remove the cap from the teat.

I claim:

1. A disposable infants feeding bottle comprising a container for liquid, said container having an outlet opening, a seating surrounding said outlet opening, a resilient teat provided with an outlet orifice, said teat having a flange portion engaging said seating and secured on said container for creating a seal to contain the liquid in said container, a removable cap enclosing said teat, said cap having an internal annular portion engaging a further portion of said teat for creating a further seal for the enclosure for said teat, and closure means sealing against communication between the interior of said container and the interior of said teat, said closure means being frictionally engaged in the interior of said teat and being displaceable by manipulation of said cap to remove said sealing means from its sealing position, such manipulation being carried out with said cap covering said teat, said cap and teat flange portion being secured to said container by a single retaining ring, said cap having a lip which engages a flange on said closure means through said teat and, by application of pressure to said cap, in a direction normal to said flange, drives said closure means into the interior of said container.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2694500 *Mar 27, 1950Nov 16, 1954Corning Glass WorksNursing bottle assembly
US2793776 *May 23, 1956May 28, 1957Lipari MichaelContainer attachment for providing a compartmental dispensing receptacle
US2889064 *May 6, 1955Jun 2, 1959Kurk Products CoFlange locking and distortion preventing means
US3220588 *Sep 17, 1964Nov 30, 1965Lipari MichaelCompartmental dispensing receptacle with accessories
US3253726 *Jun 24, 1964May 31, 1966Abbott LabSealed feeding bottle assembly
US3358864 *Nov 29, 1965Dec 19, 1967Abbott LabSealed feeding bottle assembly
US3516564 *Jan 30, 1969Jun 23, 1970Aluminum Co Of AmericaNipple assembly and package
US3519157 *May 15, 1964Jul 7, 1970Abbott LabSealed feeding bottle assembly
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4020964 *Sep 10, 1975May 3, 1977Lewis Woolf Griptight LimitedInfants feeding bottle
US4067440 *Apr 29, 1976Jan 10, 1978Tuboplast FrancePackaging container for the extemporaneous preparation of multi-component solutions
US4623068 *Aug 19, 1985Nov 18, 1986Gerber Products CompanyNipple assembly
US5411155 *Dec 27, 1993May 2, 1995Gordon; Rinda M.Baby bottle storage cover
US6675981 *Oct 6, 1997Jan 13, 2004Joseph John LeskoMind development dual baby bottle and drinking straw nipple
EP0088219A1 *Jan 26, 1983Sep 14, 1983Rodam S.A.Nipple for the feeding of nursing infants, or for stimulation of their buccal motions
WO2008148135A2 *Mar 19, 2008Dec 4, 2008Michael John Hamilton-HallA feeding bottle for babies
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/11.6, 222/213, 215/DIG.800, 206/221
International ClassificationA61J11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61J11/0095, A61J11/008, Y10S215/08
European ClassificationA61J11/00Z2, A61J11/00Z6