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Publication numberUS3859897 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 14, 1975
Filing dateMay 30, 1972
Priority dateDec 2, 1969
Publication numberUS 3859897 A, US 3859897A, US-A-3859897, US3859897 A, US3859897A
InventorsHiga James Z
Original AssigneeHiga James Z
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tool kit and method for making paper sculpture articles
US 3859897 A
Abstract
The tool includes a rod and a sleeve with a flange on the end thereof. The outer surface of the sleeve forms a gauge surface upon which a sheet of paper is rolled into a tube having a given diameter. The tube is placed over the rod which is supported on a flat surface; the sleeve and flange are positioned over the rod and tube and forced downwardly to crumple the tube between the flange and the flat surface. The crumpled tube forms a basic component for making paper sculpture articles, particularly when the tube is held in the compressed state and a twist tie member is inserted through the crumpled tube and tied and then the tube is allowed to expand to form a donut. By following certain method steps the donut or several donuts can be formed into various paper sculpture articles such as an artificial turtle, flower, pumpkin or mushroom. The parameters of the tool are such that a regular crimped pattern is formed in the crumpled tube along the total length thereof. The kit includes various items useful in making the paper sculpture articles, these items including a crimped tube holder, a rod for threading a string through the crimped tube, a container of glue, a stapler and staples, a plurality of twist tie members and a plurality of rubber bands.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 91 Higa [ TOOL KIT AND METHOD FOR MAKING PAPER SCULPTURE ARTICLES [76] Inventor: James Z. Higa, 271 Sylvan Rd.,

Glencoe, 111. 60022 Notice: The portion of the term of this patent subsequent to Aug. 22, 1989, has been disclaimed.

[22] Filed: May 30, 1972 21 Appl. No.: 257,653

Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 881,481, Dec. 2,

' 1969., Pat. No. 3,685,400.

[52] US. Cl 93/84 TW, 35/26, 93/1 R, 93/94 R [51] Int. Cl B31d 5/04 [58] Field of Search... 93/1 WZ, 1.5, 59 PL, 59 CE, 93/59 R, 94 R, 94 FL, 77 R, 82, l R; 35/26 1*Jan. 14, 1975 Primary Examiner-Roy Lake Assistant Examiner-James F. Coan Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Thomas R. Vigil 57 ABSTRACT The tool includes a rod and a sleeve with a flange on the end thereof. The outer surface of the sleeve forms a gauge surface upon which a sheet of paper is rolled into a tube having a given diameter. The tube is placed over the rod which is supported on a flat surt face; the sleeve and flange are positioned over the rod and tube and forced downwardly to crumple the tube between the flange and the flat surface. The crumpled tube forms a basic component for making paper sculpture articles, particularly when the tube is held in the compressed state and a twist tie member is inserted through the crumpled tube and tied and then the tube is allowed to expand to form a donut. By following certain method steps the donut or several donuts can be formed into various paper sculpture articles such as an artificial turtle, flower, pumpkin or mushroom. The parameters of the tool are such that a regular crimped pattern is formed in the crumpled tube along the total length thereof. The kit includes various items useful in making the paper sculpture articles, these items including a crimped tube holder, a rod for threading a string through the crimped tube, a container of glue, a stapler and staples, a plurality of twist tie members and a plurality of rubber bands.

22 Claims, 45 Drawing Figures PATENIEBJANMIBYS 3.859.897

sum 10; e

FIG. 10

PATENTEI] JAN I M975 SHEET 2 or 6 FATENTED JAN I 4 I975 FIG. 22A

FIG. 26B

TOOL KIT AND METHOD FOR MAKING PAPER SCULPTURE ARTICLES RELATED PATENT APPLICATION BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Heretofor various techniques have been proposed for making ornamental sculptured articles from pliable sheet materials, such as paper, these techniques including among others origami and paper-mache. The known techniques, for the most part, are rather complex and require a considerable degree of artistic ability, particularly when compound curves are desired.

In the art of forming paper sculpture articles, there has been a lack of flexibility in forming threedimensional articles from-paper and similar sheet materials. Typically, collapsible honey-combed structures of cotton glued tissues are utilized to provide strength for mass produced flexible ornamental articles, such as those commonly used in holiday displays. Often times special and complex machinery is necessary for mass producing such articles.

In some techniques for forming paper cylinders with a crimped pattern, such as the flexible drinking straw and collapsible cardboard'oil can, a degree of flexibility for limited and specific purposes has been provided. An example of an apparatus for crumpling a portion of a flexible drinking straw is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 339,004 issued to William Nardone on Aug. 29, 1967.

in many of the presently available three-dimensional display articles made from pliable materials, such as paper, an interior support framework is necessary since the display article is not self-supporting.

Heretofore, methods and tools for crumpling flexible tubes have been proposed. One such method and tool is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 2,054,024 issued to Harold C. Pye. In this patent there is disclosed a method for forming short flexible tubes which are utilized in mounting a floating diaphragm in a frame for a speaker. The forming tool includes a rod on which a tube is formed, a plunger and a receiving die in which the tube is compressed between a reduced diameter portion of the plunger and a shoulder within the die.

As for previously proposed methods and tools for forming ornamental paper products, reference may be had to U.S. Pat. No. 2,076,945 issued to Victor. T. Hoeflich on Apr. 13, 1937. In this patent, there is disclosed a tool comprising a first rod for forming a tube of paper, asecond rod of smaller diameter on which the paper tube is placed and a pair of collars which are slidably received on the second rod and which can be urged toward each other to compress the paper tube therebetween. Also, there is disclosed in this patent, the passing of a thread or wire through the crumpled tube to form a Christmas wreath.

The present invention provides a tool which has fewer parts than the previously proposed tools and which is easier to manipulate as will be hereinafter described in detail. Also the present invention provides a kit, including the tool, by which certain methods can be practiced for forming not only a crimped tube, but also a crimped donut from which other paper sculpture articles can be made, such as a artificial flower, turtle, pumpkin or mushroom.

SUMMARY or THE INVENTION According to the invention, there is provided a hand tool for forming pliable sheet material into tubes and for crimping each tube along the total length thereof, the tool comprises a rod, a hollow sleeve and a flange fixed to and extending outwardly from one end of the hollow sleeve. The outer surface of the sleeve defines an outer gauge surface of tubularconfiguration on which a hollow open-ended tube is formed by wrapping pliable sheet material around the gauge'surface. The end of the sleeve opposite the flange is unobstructed to permit slidable removal from the sleeve of each tube a formed thereon. The flange forms an inner abutment surface which is perpendicular to and contiguous to the gauge surface and which receives the end edge of the sheet of pliable material thereagainst when the tube is being formed thereby to square theend edge of the tube. The outer surfaceof the flange is utilized for crimping a tube on the rod when, after the tube has beenremoved from the gauge surface and is placed over the rod supported on a flat surface, the flange and sleeve are positioned on the rod over the tube and an operator pushes the sleeve downwardly to crumple a tube between the flange and the flat surface. The rod has a smooth outer surface and has a cross-section corresponding to the cross-section of the sleeve. The cross-sectional extent of the outer surface of the sleeve relative to the cross-sectional extent of the rod being such that the inner cross-sectional extent of the tube formed on the sleeve is greater than the cross-sectional extent of the rod to permit the tube easily to be fitted over the rod, and is sufficiently greater than the crosssectional extent of the rod so as to permit generally unhindered crumpling of a tube on the rod without tearing, but not so great as to result in any haphazard irregular crumpling and crimping of each tube on the rod.

Preferably, the rod and sleeve are generally cylindrical. According to the teachings of the invention, the diameter of the rod is preferably between approximately In accordance with one aspect of the present invention, the tool includes a base for supporting the rod, the base having an upper flat surface with a socket therein. The socket extends inwardly of the base from the upper flat surface and is adapted to receive and support the rod therein. When used with the base, a'tube formed on the outer surface of the sleeve is crumpled between the flange on the sleeve and the upper flat surface of the base. i

In accordance with another aspect of the present invention, the tool forms part of a kit which also may include a number of other items, such as, for example a generally U-shaped crimped tube holder which receives a crumpled tube and holds it against expansion while a tying means such as string or a twist tie member is inserted through the tube and tied, after which the tube is allowed to expand into the form of a donut. Another item of the kit is a threading rod for threading string or other tying means through the tube, the outer surface of the threading rod also being adapted for use in rolling a piece of paper into a stem, such as for an artificial flower. The kit may also include a container of glue, a stapler, and a plurality of twist ties and rubber bands. Additional items which are commonly available and which are used with the other items of the kit in V practicing the methods of the invention, include a scissors, a ruler, string, and for some applications, a tin snip or citrus tree prunning shears and a plier type stapler.

Preferably, the pliable sheet material is newspaper.

Also, according to the invention, there is provided a method for making paper sculpture articles including the steps of: rolling a sheet of paper about the gauge surface of the sleeve, holding the outer margin of the sheet of paper to the adjacent layer of paper, placing the then formed open-ended hollow tube on the rod which is supported on a flat surface, placing the sleeve over the rod with the flange in position to engage one end of the tube, pushing the sleeve downwardly to crumple the tube between the flange and the flat surface, holding the thus crumpled tube,-as compressed, while passing a tying means through the compressed crumpled tube, and tying the tying means to form the crumpled tube into a donut.

By further cutting, pressing and folding of the donut, additional paper sculpture articles can be formed, such as, a flower, a turtle, a pumpkin and a mushroom.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view illustrating the wrapping of a sheet of paper about the outer surface of the sleeve of the tool of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary perspective view of a tube on the rod of the tool with the sleeve and flange of the tool positioned above the rod and tube;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary perspective view showing the sleeve after it has been pushed downwardly on the rod to crumple the paper tube between the flange on the sleeve and a flat surface;

FIG. 4 is a side elevation of a crumpled tube;

FIG. 5 is an end elevation of a crimped tube;

FIG. 6 is a vertical sectional view of a portion of a crumpled tube taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 5 and in the indicated direction;

FIG. 7 is a plan view of the crimped tube after it has been formed into the shape of a donut;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view showing a plurality of tubes joined together to form an elongate paper sculpture article;

FIG. 9 is an end view of a crimped tube having a generally oval cross-section;

FIG. 10 is an end view of a crimped tube having a generally square cross-section;

FIG. 11 is a composite perspective view of the kit of the invention including the tool and additional items helpful in carrying out the methods of the invention;

FIG. 12 is a perspective view showing the rolling of a piece of paper on the outer surface of the tube to form a paper tube;

FIG. 13 is a perspective view showing the application of adhesive to the outer margin of the rolled sheet of paper before it is attached to the adjacent layer of paper;

FIG. 14 is a perspective view of the completed tube, the sleeve and the container of adhesive;

FIG. 15 is a perspective view of the rod supported on a base for the tool and a paper tube as it is being placed on the rod;

FIG. 16 is a perspective view showing the positioning of the sleeve and flange of the tool on the rod above the tube supported on the base before the crumpling of the tube;

FIG. 17 is a perspective view showing the sleeve after it has been gripped by an operator and pushed downwardly to crumple the tube;

FIG. 18 is a perspective view showing the removal of a crumpled and crimped tube from the rod of the tool; FIG. 19 is a perspective view showing the holding of I a crimped tube in its compressed state prior to insertion into a crimped tube holder;

FIG. 20 is a perspective view showing the crimped tube held in the crimped tube holder while a twist tie member is inserted through the tube;

FIG. 21 is a perspective view showing the tying of the tying means after it has been passed through the crimped tube;

FIGS. 22A-B are perspective views showing the removal of the crimped tube from the crimped tube holder and the expansion of the crimped tube into the shape of a donut;

FIG. 23is a perspective view showing the cutting of the donut on one side thereof intermediate the center hole and the outer periphery of the donut in the first step of forming a flower from the donut;

' FIG. 24 is a plan view showing the donut after it has been cut and after the outer part thereof has been spread apart from the inner part;

FIG. 25 is a perspective view showing the cutting of a slit in the outer part of the cut donut;

FIG. 26A is a plan view of the donut after four slits have been cut into the outer part and the thus formed quarter segments have been trimmed to the shape of flower petals;

FIG. 26B is a plan view showing the layers of the quarter segments after they have been slightly separated to better simulate flower petals;

FIG. 27A is a perspective view showing the rolling of a sheet of paper transverse to the diagonal of the sheet of paper to form a small diameter tube, and showing the application of an adhesive to the outer corner of the sheet of paper prior to the rolling of same against the adjacent layer of paper;

FIG. 27B is a perspective view of the tube as formed;

FIG. 27C is a perspective view showing the insertion of one end of the tube into the center hole of the flower and the application of adhesive to the inserted end of the tube for securing same to the center hole of the flower;

FIG. 27D is a perspective view showing the bending over of the stem forming tube adjacent to the flower;

FIG. 28 is a plan view showing the pressing in of one side of a donut to form the donut into the shape of an umbrella, cap or shell;

FIG. 29A is a perspective view of the donut shown in FIG. 25 after four slits have been cut into the outer part of the donut and two of the quarter segments have been folded over and stapled;

FIG. 29B is a plan view showing the cut donut of FIG. 29A after the four quarter segments have been folded into legs and form an X:

FIG. 30A is a perspective view of the progressive sequential folding of a sheet of paper into a narrow strip;

FIG. 30B is a perspective view of the folding of a narrow strip into a loop;

FIG. 30C is a perspective view of the pressing of the bight of the loop inwardly of the loop to form a turtle head;

FIG. 31 is a perspective view showing the rolling of a sheet of paper into a turtle tail;

FIG. 32 is a perspective view of a turtle formed by attaching the cut and folded donut shown in FIG. 298 to the inner surface of the cap shown in FIG. 28 and with the turtle head secured between the cut donut and the umbrella shaped donut forming the shell of the turtle;

FIG. 33 is a side elevational view showing the portion of the outer layer of a crumpled tube unwrapped or unravelled from the remainder of the tube;

FIG. 34 is a perspective view showing the tube of FIG. 33 after it has been formed into a donut;

FIG. 35 is a perspective view showing the application of an adhesive to the inner surface of the unravelled paper;

FIG. 36 is a perspective view showing the twisting of the unravelled paper to form a stem on a pumpkin;

FIG. 37 is a perspective view showing the pressing inwardly of one side of the donut adjacent the stem to form the pumpkin into a mushroom.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to the drawings in greater detail, wherein like numerals indicate like elements throughout, the crumpling of a paper tube into a paper sculpture article utilizing the method and tool of the present invention is shown in FIGS. 1-3. The article is identified by the reference numeral in FIGS. 3 and 4.

The tool includes a hollow sleeve and a rod 40. The sleeve 30 includes a tubular body portion 32 having a regular cross-section, for example the circular cross-section illustrated. The body portion 32 may be a plastic, metal, cardboard or the like with a wall 33 having a thickness providing stiffness and rigidity. For example, a sufficiently strong sleeve 30 is provided when the wall 33 is approximately one-eighth inch for a sleeve 30 having an outer diameter, O.D., of 1- /4 inch. Preferably, both inside and outside surfaces 34, of the body portion 32 are smooth and regular. A flange 36 is fixed to one end of the sleeve 30.'The flange 36 can be formed integral with the sleeve 30 or can be glued, welded, soldered, or otherwise affixed to the sleeve 30 depending upon the material from which the sleeve and flange are made. The flange 36 presents inner and outer abutment surfaces 37 and 38. The inner abutment surface 37 is contiguous to and extends outwardly from the outer surface 35 of the sleeve 30 and is substantially perpendicular to the outer surface 35. The outer abutment surface 38 forms a bearing sur face which bears against one end of a paper tube positioned on the rod 40 during crumpling of the tube.

The rod 40 is preferably solid and of a length substantially equal to or greater than the length of the sleeve 30. Also preferably the rod 40 has a smooth outer surface 42. According to the teachings of the present invention, the rod cross-section corresponds to that of the sleeve 30 but is smaller in size to allow a somewhat loose, yet slidable, reception of the sleeve 30 over the rod 40. One embodiment of the rod 40 consists in a solid wood cylinder with a waxed surface and with an outer diameter, O.D., of approximately l-9/l6 inch. In the embodiment of the tool illustrated in FIGS. 1-3, at

least one end 44 or 46 is squared and flattened so as to be easily supported on a flat bearing surface 50.

The tool as heretofore described is utilized in a novel method for making ornamental sculptured articles such as the crumpled paper tube 20 having a regular crimp pattern along the length thereof. According to the method, a sheet 60 of pliable material, such as newspaper, is formed into a hollow open-ended tube 65. The tube 65 will usually include a plurality of wraps of newspaper tightly formed about the gauge surface 35 with one end edge of the paper, forming the end edge of the tube, squared against the abutment surface 37. A very suitable tube is formed with approximately five wraps of newspaper. Of course, the number of wraps may vary according to the thickness of the material used and the composition of the material used. It is likewise to be understood that a plurality of sheets 60 may be formed together into a single tube 65. For example, an outer sheet of colored tissue or fancy paper may be used over sheets of newsprint. Outer margin 66 of the sheet may be adhered to the outer layer or wall surface 67 of the paper tube 65 as shown by well known methods suitable to the particular material or sheet such as, with an adhesive or by taping the margin 62 to the adjacent layer 67 of the paper sheet. The inner edge 68 of the tube need not be adhered and is preferably left free as shown.

The tube 65 formed on the outer surface 35 of the sleeve 30 is removed therefrom by sliding the tube 65 outwardly away from the flange 36. The tube 65 is then placed over the rod 40 as shown in FIG. 2. Next, as shown in FIG. 3, the tube 65 is crumpled on the rod 40 along the entire length thereof between the outer abutment surface 38 of the flange 36 and the flat surface 50. In this respect, the sleeve 30 is forcefully slid along the rod 40 in the direction of the arrow shown in FIG. 3.

. The rod 40 provides vertical guidance for the tube 65 as it is being crumpled and ensures that crumpling of the tube 65 is longitudinally of the tube 65. As a result of crumpling, the length of tube 65 is shortened and wall 67 is inwardly and outwardly creased in a relatively regular crimp pattern as will be hereinafter described. The pattern and its regularity are in accordance to an inward deformation limit defined by the outer surface 42 of the rod 40. In this respect, an inward deformation space limitation is defined between the inside of the tube 65, namely the inner diameter thereof, and the outer rod surface 42. The inward space deformation limitation and the vertical guidance provided by rod surface 42 enhance even pressure distribution on the tube 65 between the flange 36 and the flat surface 50.

The resulting ornamental paper sculpture article 20 is a flexible crimped tube as shown in FIG. 4. The crimped pattern shown in detail in FIG. 6 is of substantially diamond shapes 70. It is to be understood that the crimp pattern is not perfectly regular with exact equalsized diamonds. Variances in the thickness of the sheet of material 60 and flaws in the sheet of material 60 preclude such exact results. However, the relative regularity and substantial equality of the diamond shapes 70 is surprising and indeed attractive. The pattern is made up of inward creases and outward creases 76. The inward creases 75 are spaced apart from one another and are normal to the length of the ornamental article or crumpled tube 20. Outward creases 76, on the other hand, are at acute angles to inward creases 75 and to one another and intersect to define common sides of the adjacent diamond shapes 70 as best shown in FIG. 6. In the crumpled tube illustrated in the drawings, it is to be noted that inward creases 75 define a polygon at the interior cross-section as shown in FIG. 5.

Other cross-sectional shapes may be formed, such as an oval cross-sectional shape 80 shown in FIG. 9 or a square cross-sectional shape 85 shown in FIG. 10, dependent upon the cross-section chosen for the sleeve 30 and the rod 40. Different ornamental or paper sculpture effects may be accomplished with each particular cross-sectional shape. For example, the crimped tubes formed with the tool of the present invention are extremely flexible and opposite ends 95 thereof (FIG. 4) may be joined to form the donut shape of the FIG. 7. Alternatively, a plurality of tubes 20 may be joined into an ornamental coil shape 100 shown in FIG. 8. The various paper sculpture articles formed from the crimped tubes are useful as ornamental decorations, favors and packages.

It is to be noted that there must be some space between the tube 65 and the rod 40. Otherwise, if the tube 65 were tightly wrapped about the rod 40, crumpling of the tube 65 to form the crumpled tube 20 would be hindered and would most likely result'in tearing of the sheet material. At the other extreme, if the tube 65 were too loose on the rod 40, for example without any rod 40 at all, the crumpling would be completely haphazard without any degree of regularity. A medium condition is required that is sufficiently loose to allow easy crumpling, yet including a deformation space limitation to limit the extent of the inward creases when the tube 65 is crumpled and so that the rod surface 42 provides vertical guidance to ensure even pressure distribution on the tube 65 when the sleeve 30 and flange 36 are pressed downwardly on the rod 40 toward the flat surface 50. It has been found that by using the outer surface of the sleeve 30 as a gauge surface, a proper and desired relationship between the inner diameter of the tube 65 and the outer diameter of the rod 40 is obtained. Dependent upon the particular sheet material used and the 'number of wraps thereof, an ideal condition for crumpling of the tube 65 easily can be achieved by trial and error.

From a number of empirical tests made with rods and sleeves of different size, it has been found that to obtain satisfactory results, that is to say, to obtain a crumpled tube which can be used for making a wide variety of paper sculpture articles, the rod should be at least onehalf inch in diameter and preferably not more than four inches in diameter. A crumpled tube having an inner diameterless than one-half inch has only limited usefulness whereas a crumpled tube having an inner diameter greater than four inches is awkward to manipulate and for that reason also has limited usefulness.

With respect to obtaining a regular crimped pattern when crumpling a tube on the rod, tests have been made with several sleeves, each having a predetermined size, and using each sleeve with a number of rods, each having a different size. The test results show that a good regular crimped pattern is obtained when the ratio of the outer diameter, O.D., of the sleeve to the outer diameter of the rod is a number between 0.70 and 0.94. Of course, it is to be understood that crumpled tubes formed from a tool having a sleeve outer diameter to rod outer diameter ratio falling near either end of the ratio range 0.70-0.94 are barely satisfactory and do not always have a regular crimped pattern. It has been found that tubes crumpled with a tool having a sleeve outer diameter to rod outer diameter ratio equal to approximately 0.82 have a consistently regular crim pattern along the total length of the crumpled tube. Also, of course, the ratio range will vary somewhat for different types of paper and different wraps of paper.

A very convenient paper is newspaper and it has been found that excellent results are obtained with a standard sheet of newspaper having a width of approximately 15 inches and a length of approximately 23-V2 inches.

One preferred embodiment of the tool of the present invention for crimping sheets of newspaper has a sleeve outer diameter of approximately 1.67 inch and a rod outer diameter of 1.37 inch. Both the rod and sleeve have a length of approximately 17 inches. Crumpled tubes made with a tool having these dimensions are particularly useful in making more complex paper sculpture articles as will be described hereinafter in connection with the description of FIGS. 1l37.

Thus, one preferred tube made from a sheet of newspaper has, before crumpling, a diameter of approximately 1.37 inch and a length of approximately 15 inches.

The tool formed by the sleeve 30, having the flange 36 at one end, and the rod 40 are particularly useful in a kit for making paper sculpture articles. The basic components of such a kit are shown in FIG. 11. Here the tool is generally identified by the reference numeral 111 and includes a sleeve having an outer gauge surface and a flange 136 at one end thereof. The flange 136 provides inner and outer abutment surfaces 137 and 138. The tool also includes a rod 140 having an outer surface 142. To facilitate the positioning of the rod 140 in a generally upright position, the tool 111 also includes a base having a generally flat upper surface 152 and a socket 154 which extends into the base 150 and opens onto the flat surface 152 and which is adapted to receive one end of the rod 140. The rod 140, of course, is sized so that either end thereof fits into the socket 154. It will be understood, of course, that crumpling of a tube is effected between the abutment surface 138 of the flange 136 and the upper flat surface 152 of the base 150.

The kit also includes a crimped tube holder which is adapted to hold a compressed crumpled tube while a tying means is inserted through the tube. As shown, the holder 160 has a generally U-shape and includes a generally flat bight portion 162 and generally upstanding legs 164 and 166. As best shown in FIGS. 19-20, the upstanding legs 164 and 166 are adapted to receive and hold therebetween a compressed crumpled tube. To facilitate the insertion of a tying means such as string through a crumpled tube held in the holder 160, each of the legs 164, 166 has a slot 168, 170 therein extending downwardly from the upper edge thereof.

The kit further includes a threading rod 172 having a slit 174 at one end thereof. The threading rod 172 is adapted to hold one end of the tying means, such as string, in the slit 174 while the threading rod 172 is in serted through a compressed crumpled tube held in the holder 160. The outer surface of the threading rod 172 constitutes a roll forming surface about which a sheet of pliable sheet material can be rolled to form a stem,

such as for an artificial flower, as will be explained in greater detail in connection with the description of FIGS. 27A-D.

Other items of the kit are a container of glue 180, a plurality of twist tie members 184, a plurality of rubber bands 186, a stapler 188 and a plurality of staples (not shown) for the stapler 188. Although not shown, it will be understood that the kit can also include a conventional scissors. Since scissors are a very common tool found in almost all homes, offices and classrooms, a scissors is not shown in FIG. 11 as part of the kit, although it is needed for forming some of the paper sculpture articles to be described hereinafter with ref- .erence to FIGS. 23 and 25.

Some of the elements of the kit, such as, the tool 111, the holder 160 and the threading rod 172 are novel while other items of the kit, such as, the glue container 180, the twist tie members 184, the rubber bands 186 and the stapler 188 are conventional.

With the items of the kit in FIG. 11 and a scissors, a number of paper sculpture articles can be formed in accordance with the method steps of the present invention. All of the paper sculpture articles to be described hereinafter utilize a basic component namely a crumpled tube formed into the shape of a donut. Accordingly, the basic method steps of the present invention are for making a paper sculpture article consisting essentially of a crumpled tube formed into the shape of a donut. These method steps are shown in FIGS. 12-22B. The first step is to roll a sheet of paper 190 about the gauge surface 135 as shown in FIG. 12. While rolling the sheet of paper 190, one end edge 192 thereof is squared against the inner abutment surface 137 of the flange 136. After most of the sheet of paper 190 has been rolled onto the gauge surface 135, adhesive is applied from the container 180 to outer margin 194 of. the sheet of paper 190 as shown in FIG. 13. Then the outer margin 194 is adhered to the next adjacent layer 196 of the paper roller onto the sleeve 130. In this way, a paper tube 200 is formed on the sleeve 130. The paper tube 200 is then removed from the sleeve 130 as shown in FIG. 14. Next the paper tube now grips the outer surface 135 of the sleeve and pushes strongly and firmly downwardly in the direction of the arrow 205 as shown in FIG. 17 to crumple the tube between the flange 136 and the flat surface 152. It is to be noted that the outer surface of the tube not only forms a gauge surface for forming the tube 200 but also forms a more than adequate gripping surface whereby an operator can grip the sleeve 130 for pushing the sleeve 130 strongly and firmly downwardly to crumple the tube 200. The thus crumpled tube is identifled by the reference numeral 208 in FIG. 17. The sleeve 130 is removed from the rod 140 and the crumpled tube 208 is removed from the rod 140 as shown in FIG. 18 and then placed in the crimped tube holder as shown in FIG. 19. Next, a tying means such as one of the twist tie members 184 is passed through the compressed crumpled tube held in the holder of 160as shown in FIG. 20. Then the twist tie member is twisted or tied as shown in FIG. 21. The thustied compressed crumpled tube 208 is nowremoved from the crimped tube holder 160 as shown in FIG. 22A and allowed to expand into the shape of a donut 210. Stated otherwise, the tube 208 expands about the tie member 184 until opposed open ends 211 and 212 of the tube 208 are ad jacent each other, thus forming the crumpled tube 208 into the shape of a donut.

The donut shaped crumpled tube 210 hereinafter referred to as the donut 210 can now be utilized in forming a wide variety of paper sculpture articles. For example, it can be utilized in making a flower as shown in FIG. 268. To make a flower, a scissors 214 is first inserted into one of the adjacent opposed open ends 211, 212 of the donut 210. Then the donut 210 is cut with the scissors 214 in a circular direction intermediate its center hole 216 and its outer periphery 218 as shown in FIG. 23. After completing the circular cut, the donut 210 now is separated into an outer part 220 and an inner circular part 222 as shown in FIG. 24. Next, the scissors 214 is utilized in cutting four equi-distant radial slits in the outer part 220 as shown in FIG. 25. Next, each of the thus formed quarter segments 231-234 (FIG. 26A) are trimmed to the shape of flower petals as shown in FIG. 26A. Next, the layers in each segment 231-234 are gently separated to better simulate flower petals and thereby form an artificial flower 240 shown in FIG. 26B.

It is desirable to provide a stem for the flower 240 and the method for making a stem and attaching same to the flower 240 is shown in FIGS. 27A-27D. As shown in FIG. 27A the threading rod or roll starting rod 172 is utilized in forming the stem. In this respect a sheet of paper 244 is rolled on the rod 172 starting with a corner thereof and rolling in a direction transverse to a diagonal of the sheet of paper 244 as shown in FIG. 27A. Then adhesive is applied from the container to the outer corner 146 of the sheet of paper 244, after which the corner is adhered to the adjacent layer 248 of the sheet of paper 244 rolled on the rod 172. The thus formed tube 250 on the rod 172 is shown in FIG. 278. The tube 250 is used for the stem of the flower 240 by inserting one end 252 of the tube 250 into the center hole 216 of the flower 240 as shown in FIG. 27C. Next adhesive is applied from the container 180 to the end 252 and the periphery of the hole 216 for securing the end 252 within the center hole 216. After the adhesive sets and cures, the stem 250 can be bent a short distance from the flower 240 as shown in FIG. 27D. The flower 240 with stem 250 can now be inserted in a vase or other supporting structure. If desired, the flower 240 can be painted in any number of colors.

Another paper sculpture article which can be formed from the donut 210 is an artificial turtle 260 shown in FIG. 32. The turtle 260 is made from two donuts 210 and the method for forming the turtle 260 is illustrated in FIGS. 28-31. To make the outer or upper shell of the turtle 260, one side of a donut 210 is pressed inwardly to form the donut 210 into a shell or cap as shown in FIG. 28. To form the bottom shell and legs for the turtle one follows the steps for making a donut 210 into a flower 240 as previously described up to the step of trimming the quarter segments 231-234 into the shape of flower petals. Instead of trimming the quarter segments 231-234, each quarter segment is folded about its longitudinal-radial axis to form the quarter segments into an X as shown in FIGS. 29A and 29B. The thus folded quarter segments are secured in place with a stapler as shown in FIG. 29A. The donut 210 as now cut and folded forms a leg structure and lower shell of the turtle. In this respect, the folded quarter segments now define legs 261-264 for the turtle 260 and the inner circular part 222 forms or defines the lower shell for the turtle. The leg structure and lower shell are now secured to an umbrella shaped cap 265 formed by pressing one donut 210 inwardly as shown in FIG. 28. The turtle is now complete except for a head and tail.

A method for making a turtle head is shown in FIGS. 30A-30C. As shown in FIG. 30A, a rectangular sheet of paper 270 is folded over several times to form a narrow strip 272. Next, the narrow strip 272 is folded over to form an elongate loop 274 with a round bight 276 at one end. As best shown in FIG. 30B the bight 276 is formed by folding the strip 272 about ones thumb. Next the rounded bight 276 is pinched with the thumb and forefinger as shown in FIG. 30C to fold portions of the bight 276 into the loop 274 thereby to form a turtle head 278 as best shown in FIG. 32. The free ends of the loop are now secured between the lower shell 222 and the upper shell 265 midway between two of the legs 261-264.

A tail for the turtle 260 is easily formed by rolling a short piece of paper transversely of a diagonal thereof starting with one corner to form the sheet of paper into a tube as shown in FIG. 31. Then the outer corner of the sheet of paper 280 is secured to the adjacent layer of paper and the thus formed tube is secured between the upper shell 265 and lower shell 222 midway between two of the legs 261-264 of the turtle 260 opposite the head 278.

Another paper sculpture article which can be formed from a crumpled tube 208 is a pumpkin 290 shown in FIG. 36. To make the pumpkin 290, one first omits the step of gluing the other margin 194 to the adjacent layer 196. Instead a paper tube formed by rolling the sheet of paper 190 on the gauge surface 135 is held in place by several of the rubber bands 186. Typically this is accomplished with three rubber bands 186 as shown in phantom line in FIG. 16. The paper tube held together by the rubber bands 186 is now crumpled in the same way as the tube 200 is crumpled as shown in FIGS. 16 and 17. After being crumpled and before being formed into a donut the rubber bands are removed and a portion 292 of the crumpled sheet of paper is unravelled from the thus formed crumpled tube 294 as shown in FIG. 3. Then the tube 294 is formed into a donut 296 as shown in FIG. 34 with the unravelled portion 292 extending therefrom. Now an adhesive is applied from the container 180 to the inner surface of the unravelled portion 292 as shown in FIG. 35. Next, the unravelled portion 292 is gently twisted and squeezed to form a stem or stalk 298 for the pumpkin 290 as best shown in FIG. 36. Next, the end of the stalk is trimmed to a desired length.

However, if it is desired to form a mushroom instead of a pumpkin, the stem or stalk 298 is not trimmed but instead the side of the donut 296 adjacent the stalk 298 is pressed inwardly with the operators thumbs as shown in FIG. 37. In this way, the donut 296 is formed into an umbrella shape similar to the shape of the shell 265 thereby forming a mushroom.

From the foregoing description it will be appreciated that the tool of the present invention and the kit including same enable one to make a wide variety of paper sculpture articles several of which have been described above. Also, the methods of the invention enable one to make particular paper sculpture articles including a flower, a turtle, a pumpkin and a mushroom. Modifications and variations to the tool, kit, method and articles formed therewith will occur to those skilled in the art. Accordingly, the scope of the tool, kit, method and articles of the present invention are only to be limited as necessitated by the accompanying claims.

I claim:

1. A hand tool for forming pliable sheet material into tubes and for crimping each tube along the total length thereof, said tool comprising a rod having a given length and a given cross-sectional configuration, a hollow sleeve having a wall thickness sufficient to provide a substantially stiff and rigid sleeve, the outer surface of the sleeve wall defining an outer gauge surface of tubular configuration on which a hollow open-ended tube of pliable sheet material with a given inner crosssectional extent is formed by wrapping pliable sheet material about said gauge surface, said sleeve having first and second ends, said first end of said sleeve being unobstructed to permit easy slidable removal from said sleeve of each tube formed on said sleeve, a flange which is fixed to and which extends laterally outwardly from said second end beyond said gauge surface so as to provide an inner abutment surface which is perpendicular to and contiguous to said gauge surface and which receives thereagainst the end edge of a sheet of pliable material when the material is being formed into a tube thereby to square the end edge of the tube during the formation thereof, said flange also providing an outer bearing surface at said second end of said sleeve for applying even pressure against one end edge of atube during the crimping thereof, said rod having a smooth outer surface and being of a cross-section corresponding to the cross-section of said sleeve, the cross-sectional extent of said outer surface of said sleeve relative to the cross-sectional extent of said rod being such that the inner cross-sectional extent of a tube formed on said sleeve is greater than the crosssectional extent of said rod to permit the tube easily to be fitted over said rod, and is sufficiently greater than said cross-sectional extent of said rod so as to permit generally unhindered crumpling of a tube on said rod without tearing, but not so great as to result in haphazard irregular crumpling and crimping of each tube on said rod, and a base having a generally flat upper surface and a socket which opens into said flat upper surface and extends into said base and which is adapted to receive one end of said rod for supporting same in a generally upright position, at least one end of said rod being sized to fit in said socket, the space between the inside of a tube and said rod outer surface defining an inward deformation limitation space which limits the inward extent of the inward creases of a tube, the engagement of the inward creases with said rod outer surface during crumpling of the tube being such that said rod outer surface provides vertical guidance for the tube to enhance even pressure distribution on the tube during crumpling, crumpling of a tube being effected between said flange and said flat surface when the tube, after it is removed from the sleeve, is placed over said rod with said one end of said rod received in said socket, said sleeve is positioned over said rod with said flange positioned to engage an end edge of the tube and an operator firmly grips said sleeve outer surface and pushes said sleeve and flange downwardly toward said flat surface thereby to crumple the tube and to provide the crumpled tube with outward and inward creases defining a substantially regular crimp pattern along the total length of the tube.

2. The tool according to claim 1 wherein said rod and said sleeve are generally cylindrical and the ratio of the diameter of said rod to the diameter of said sleeve outer surface is a number between approximately 0.70 and 0.94.

3. The tool according to claim 2 wherein said ratio number is about 0.82.

4. The tool according to claim 1 wherein said rod and said sleeve are generally cylindrical and the diameter of said rod is between approximately one-half inch and four inches.

5. The tool according to claim 1 wherein said rod and said sleeve are generally cylindrical and the diameter of said rod is approximately 1.37 inches and the diameter of said sleeve outer surface is approximately 1.67 inches.

6. A hand tool for forming pliable sheet material into tubes and for crimping each tube along the total length thereof, said tool comprising a generally cylindrical rod having a given length, a hollow generally cylindrical sleeve having a wall thickness sufficient to provide a substantially stiff and rigid sleeve, the outer surface of the sleeve wall defining an outer gauge surface of tubular configuration on which a hollow open-ended tube of pliable sheet material with a given inner diameter is formed by wrapping pliable sheet material about said gauge surface, said sleeve having first and second ends, said first end of said sleeve being unobstructed to permit easy slidable removal from said sleeve of each tube formed on said sleeve, and a flange which is fixed to and which extends laterally outwardly from said second end beyond said gauge surface so as to provide an inner abutment surface which is perpendicular to and contiguous to said gauge surface and which receives thereagainst the end edge of a sheet of pliable material when the material is being formed into a tube thereby to square the end edge of the tube during the formation thereof, said flange also providing an outer bearing surface at said second end of said sleeve for applying even pressure against one end edge of a tube during the crimping thereof, said rod having a smooth outer surface and having a diameter corresponding to the diameter of said sleeve, the diameter of said outer surface of said sleeve relative to the diameter of said rod being such that the inner diameter of a tube formed on said sleeve is greater than the diameter of said rod to permit the tube easily to be fitted over said rod, and is sufficiently greater than said rod diameter so as to permit generally unhindered crumpling of a tube on said rod without tearing but not so great as to result in haphazard irregular crumpling and crimping of each tube on said rod, the ratio of said rod diameter to said sleeve outer surface diameter being a number between approximately 0.70 and 0.94, at least one end of said rod being squared and flattened to permit said one end to rest on a flat surface, the space between the inside of a tube and said rod outer surface defining an inward deformation limitation space which limits the inward extent of the inward creases of a tube, the engagement of the inward creases with said rod outer surface during crumpling of the tube being such that said rod outer surface provides vertical guidance for the tube to enhance even pressure distribution on the tube during crumpling, crumpling of a tube being effected between said flange and the flat surface when the tube, after it is removed from the sleeve, is placed over said rod with said one end of said rod resting on the flat surface, said sleeve is positioned over said rod with said flange positioned to engage an end edge of the tube and an operator firmly grips said sleeve outer surface and pushes said sleeve and flange downwardly toward the flat surface thereby to crumple the tube and to provide the crumpled tube with outward and inward creases defining a substantially regular crimp pattern along the total length of the tube.

7. The tool according to claim 6 wherein said ratio number if approximately 0.82.

8. The tool according to claim 6 wherein said rod diameter is between approximately one-half inch and four inches.

9. The tool according to claim 6 wherein said rod diameter is approximately 1.37 inches and said sleeve outer surface diameter is approximately 1.67 inches.

10. The tool according to claim 6 wherein said rod and said sleeve are approximately 17 inches long.

11. A hand tool for forming pliable sheet material into tubes and for crimping each tube along the total length thereof, said tool comprising a generally cylindrical rod having a given length, a hollow generally cylindrical sleeve having a wall' thickness sufficient to provide a substantially stiff and rigid sleeve, the outer surface of the sleeve wall defining; an outer gauge surface of tubular configuration on which a hollow openended tube of pliable sheet material with a given inner diameter is formed by wrapping pliable sheet material about said gauge surface, said sleeve having first and second ends, said first end of said sleeve being unobstructed to permit easy slidable removal from said sleeve of each tube formed on said sleeve, and a flange which is fixed to and which extends laterally outwardly from said second end beyond said] gauge surface so as to provide an inner abutment surface which is perpendicular to and contiguous to said gauge surface and which receives thereagainst the end edge of a sheet of pliable material when the material is being formed into a tube thereby to square the end edge of the tube during the formation thereof, said flange also providing an outer bearing surface at said second end of said sleeve for applying even pressure against one end edge of a tube during the crimping thereof, said rod having a smooth outer surface and having a diamter corresponding to the diameter of said sleeve, the diamter of said outer surface of said sleeve relative to the diameter of said rod being such that the inner cross-sectional extent of a tube formed on said sleeve is greater than the diameter of said rod to permit the tube easily to be fitted over said rod, and is sufficiently greater than said rod diameter so as to permit generally unhindered crumpling of a tube on said rod without tearing but not so great as to result in haphazard irregular crumpling of each tube on said rod, said rod diameter being between approximately one-half inch and four inches, at least one end of said rod being squared and flattened to permit said one end to rest on a flat surface, the space be tween the inside of a tube and said. rod oute surface defining an inward deformation limitation space which limits the inward extent of the inward creases of a tube, the engagement of the inward creases with said rod outer surface during crumpling of the tube being such that said rod outer surface provides vertical guidance for the tube to enhance even pressure distribution on the tube during crumpling, crumpling of a tube being effected between said flange and the flat surface when the tube, after it is removed from the sleeve, is placed over said rod with said one end of said rod resting on the flat surface, said sleeve is positioned over said rod with said flange positioned to engage an end edge of the tube and an operator firmly grips said outer surface of said sleeve and pushes said sleeve and flange downwardly toward the flat surface thereby to crumple the tube and to provide the crumpled tube with outward and inward creases defining a substantially regular crimp pattern along the' total length of the tube.

12. The tool according to claim 11 wherein the ratio of said rod diameter and said sleeve outer surface diameter is a number equal to approximately 0.82.

13. A kit for forming pliable sheet material into tubes, for crimping each tube along the total length thereof and for forming a crumpled tube into the shape of a donut, said kit comprising a rod having a given length and a given cross-sectional configuration, a hollow sleeve having a wall thickness sufficient to provide a substantially stiff and rigid sleeve, the outer surface of the sleeve wall defining an outer gauge surface of tubular configuration on which a hollow open-ended tube of pliable sheet material with a given inner crosssectional extent is formed by wrapping pliable sheet material about said gauge surface, said sleeve having first and second ends, said first end of said sleeve being unobstructed to permit easy slidable removal from said sleeve of each tube formed on said sleeve, a flange which is fixed to and which extends laterally outwardly from said second end beyond said gauge surface so as to provide an inner abutment surface which is perpendicular to and contiguous to said gauge surface and which receives thereagainst the end edge of a sheet of pliable material when the material is being formed into a tube thereby to square the end edge of the tube during the formation thereof, said flange also providing an outer bearing surface at said second end of said sleeve for applying even pressure against one end edge of a tube during the crimping thereof, said rod having a smooth outer surface and being of a cross-section corresponding to the cross-section of said sleeve, the cross-sectional extent of said outer surface of said sleeve relative to the cross-sectional extent of said rod being such that the inner cross-sectional extent of a tube formed on said sleeve is greater than the crosssectional extent of said rod to permit the tube easily to be fitted over said rod, and is sufficiently greater than said cross-sectional extent of said rod so as to permit generally unhindered crumpling of a tube on said rod without tearing, but not so great as to result in haphazard irregular crumpling of each tube on said rod, at least one end of said rod being squared and flattened to permit said one end to rest on a flat surface, the space between the inside of a tube and said rod outer surface defining an inward deformation limitation space which limits the inward extent of the inward creases of a tube, the engagement of the inward creases with said rod outer surface during crumpling of the tube being such that said rod outer surface provides vertical guidance for the tube to enhance even pressure distribution on the tube during crumpling, crumpling of a tube being effected between said flange and the flat surface when the tube, after it is removed from the sleeve, is placed over said rod with said one end of said rod resting on the flat surface, said sleeve is positioned over said rod with said flange positioned to engage an end edge of the tube, and an operator firmly grips said outer surface of said sleeve and pushes said sleeve and flange downwardly toward the flat surface thereby to crumple the tube and to provide the crumpled tube with outward and inward creases defining a substantially regular crimp pattern along the total length of the tube, and a generally U-shaped crimped tube holder having a flat base portion and spaced apart upstanding legs between which a crumpled tube is placed and held against expansion while a tying means is inserted through the tube and tied for forming the tube into a donut.

14. The kit according to claim 13 wherein each of said legs has a slot therein extending downwardly from the upper edge thereof, said slots facilitating the insertion of a threading rod through a tube held between said legs.

15. The kit according to claim 13 including a base for supporting said rod in a generally upright position on the flat surface, said base having a generally flat upper surface and a socket for receiving said one end of said rod, whereby crumpling of a tube on said rod is effected between said base upper surface and said flange.

16. The kit according to claim 13 including a cylindrical threading rod having at least one end with a slit therein, said slit being adapted to receive a tying means, such as string, and said threading rod is adapted to be inserted through the crumpled tube in said holder for passing said tying means through the tube, the outer surface of said threading rod defining a roll forming surface about which a sheet of pliable sheet material can be rolled to form a stem, such as for an artificial flower.

17. The kit according to claim 13 including a container of adhesive for sealing a paper tube before the crumpling thereof.

18. The kit according to claim 13 including a plurality of stiff but flexible twist tie members each for tying a crumpled tube into a donut shape.

19. The kit according to claim 13 including a plurality of rubber bands for holding a paper tube in place during the crumpling thereof.

20. The kit according to claim 13 including a stapler and a plurality of staples for securing cut or folded protions of a crumpled tube.

21. The kit according to claim 13 including a scissors for cutting a crumpled tube.

22. A kit for forming pliable sheet material into tubes, for crimping each tube along the length thereof and for forming a crumpled tube into the shape of a donut, said kit comprising a rod having a given length and a given cross-sectional configuration, a hollow sleeve having a wall thickness sufficient to provide a substantially stiff and rigid sleeve, the outer surface of the sleeve wall defining an outer gauge surface of tubular configuration on which a hollow open-ended tube of pliable sheet material with a given inner crosssectional extent is formed by wrapping pliable sheet material about said gauge surface, said sleeve having first and second ends, said first end of said sleeve being unobstructed to permit easy slidable removal from said sleeve of each tube formed on said sleeve, and a flange which is fixed to and which extends laterally outwardly from said second end beyond said gauge surface so as to provide an inner abutment surface which is perpendicular to and contiguous to said gauge surface and which receives thereagainst the end edge of a sheet of pliable material when the material is being formed into a tube thereby to square the end edge of the tube during the formation thereof, said flange also providing an outer bearing surface at said second end of said sleeve for applying even pressure against one end edge of a tube during the crimping thereof, said rod having a smooth outer surface and being of a cross-section corresponding to the cross-section of said sleeve, the cross-sectional extent of said outer surface of said sleeve relative to the cross-sectional extent of said rod being such that the inner cross-sectional extent of a tube formed on said sleeve is greater than the crosssectional extent of said rod to permit the tube easily to be fitted over said rod, and is sufficiently greater than said cross-sectional extent of said rod so as to permit generally unhindered crumpling of a tube on said rod without tearing but not so great as to result in haphazard irregular crumpling of each tube on said rod, a base having a generally flat upper surface and a socket which opens onto said flat upper surface and extends into said base and which is adapted to receive one end of said rod for supporting said rod in a generally upright position, at least one end of said rod being sized to fit in said socket, the space between the inside of a tube and said rod outer surface defining an inward deforma tion limitation space which limits the inward extent of the inward creases of a tube, the engagement of the in ward creases with said rod outer surface during crumpling of the tube being such that said rod outer surface provides vertical guidance for the tube to enhance even pressure distribution on the tube during crumpling, crumpling of a tube being effected. between said flange and said flat surface when the tube, after it is removed from the sleeve, is placed over said rod with said one end of said rod received in said socket, said sleeve is positioned over said rod with said flange positioned to engage an end edge of the tube and an operator firmly grips said outer surface of said sleeve and pushes said sleeve and flange downwardly toward said flat surface thereby to crumple the tube and to provide the crumpled tube with outward and inward creases defining a substantially regular crimp pattern along the total length of the tube, a generally U-shaped crimped tube holder having a flat base portion and spaced apart upstanding legs between which a crumpled tube is placed and held against expansion while a tying means is passed through the tube and tied for forming the tube into a donut, a cylindrical threading rod having at least one end with a slit therein, said slit beingadapted to receive a tying means, such as a string, and said threading rod being adapted to be inserted through a crumpled tube held in said holder for passing said tying means through the tube, the outer surface of said threading rod defining a roll forming surface about which a sheet of pliable sheet material can be rolled to form a stem, such as for an artificial flower, a container of adhesive for sealing a paper tube before the crumpling thereof, a plurality of stiff but flexible twist tie members each for tying a crumpled tube into a donot shape, a stapler, and a plurality of staples for securing cut or folded portions of a crumpled tube.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5525176 *May 22, 1995Jun 11, 1996Higa; James Z.Reinforced crimped paper objects and methods for making reinforced crimped paper objects
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Classifications
U.S. Classification493/276, 493/394, 428/17, 493/464, 493/307, 493/297, 493/287, 428/542.2, 428/16, 428/24
International ClassificationA41G1/00, A41G1/04
Cooperative ClassificationA41G1/04
European ClassificationA41G1/04