Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3860008 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 14, 1975
Filing dateOct 3, 1973
Priority dateOct 3, 1973
Also published asCA1023234A, CA1023234A1, DE2446803A1, DE2446803B2
Publication numberUS 3860008 A, US 3860008A, US-A-3860008, US3860008 A, US3860008A
InventorsBatdorf David B, Davidson James B, Miner Kenneth G, Talcott Thomas D
Original AssigneeDow Corning
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flat drain
US 3860008 A
Abstract
This is a drain formed of an elastomeric material having a series of channels spaced from each other, the channels defined by walls comprising a pair of rods connected by a web, the rods lying on two different planes.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Miner et al.

[ Jan. 14, 1975 FLAT DRAIN [73] Assignee: Dow Corning Corporation, Midland,

Mich.

[22] Filed: Oct. 3, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 402,924

[52] US. Cl. 128/350 R, 128/208 [51] Int. Cl A6lm 27/00 [58] Field of Search 128/348-351, 128/208 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,134,152 10/1938 Schwarzmayr 128/350 R FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 105,038 1917 Great Britain 128/350 R OTHER PUBLICATIONS ACMI Catalogue 1938 pg. 41.

Primary Examiner-Dalton L. Truluck Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Gordon Needleman [57] ABSTRACT This is a drain formed of an elastomeric material having a series of channels spaced from each other, the channels defined by walls comprising a pair of rods connected by a web, the rods lying on two different planes.

4 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures FLAT DRAIN BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION cutoff. It may be left in the wound for an extended pe- 1 riod of time and should have the construction that will not cause pain or trauma when the patient moves about. Tubular drains such as the Penrose drain tend to collapse or clog with the debris or coagulant blood destroying their efficacy. Obviously, if a drain is clogged or closed and the necessity for drainage still exists a new drain must be inserted causing discomfort to the patient.

Absorbent dressings such as gauze or a packed Penrose tend for the most part to loose their drainage capacities very quickly in the wound. Plain gauze drains absorb fluids and particulate matter thereby inviting infection, macerating the wound and surrounding tissue while creating the possibility that the drain will adhere to the tissue or might ultimately become hard, nonpliable and thus painful to the patient.

The patent to Schwarzmayr, US. Pat. No. 2,134,152 issued Oct. 25, 1938 discloses a strip drain at FIGS. 9 and 10 which includes a series of elongated ribs 13 which are in spaced parallel relation on a base and each pair of which defines a channel 14. Note that the openings in the channel are not constrained and that the ribs are of rectangular configuration.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention is directed to a one piece, flat surgical drain formed of a series of elongated round rods or tubes which are positioned on two planes, are in staggered relation to the rods on the other plane from that on which they lie, are spaced from each other and connected to the adjacent staggered rods by elongated web portions. The set of three adjacent rods including two on the same plane and a rod in staggered relation to them and their connecting webs defines a triangular channel leading the fluids to be drained from the surgical wound or cavity. The web portions extend along the length of the rods on which they are attached. The use of a series of channels avoids the danger of clogging that a drain having a single lumen may encounter. The flat drain cannot collapse as can a tubular drain nor does shrinkage seriously effect its operating capabilities. Varying widths of drains may be easily and quickly provided by tearing longitudinally along a rib. Extremely wide areas may be drained by placing two or more strips side by side. The area of possible infection is reduced in comparison with round drains due to the fact that only a narrower opening is required. If a thicker drain should be needed the strips can be stacked one on top of another or rolled into a circular section.

Of particular importance is the fact that the distance between the spaced rods is less than the distance between the web of the rods preventing larger particulate matter or tissue from entering the channel and clogging or plugging them.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Other objects and attendant advantages of the present invention will become obvious to those skilled in the art from a reading of the following detailed descrip tion when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a top plane view of the drain.

FIG. 2 is a section taken on a line 2-2 of FIG. 1.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS There is shown in the drawings a flat strip drain comprising a series of elongated rods 10 which lie on two planes which are in spaced parallel relation to each other. The rods 10 are positioned in two planes which are in spaced relation to each other and the rods on the first plane are in staggered relation to the rods on the second plane. The adjacent rods on different planes are attached to each other by elongated, fairly thin webs 12 which extend along the length of the rods. The combination of two rods on the same plane adjacent to each other and spaced from each other and the staggered rod with which they are attached lying on a different plane and the attachment webs form a somewhat triangular channel which is the drainage channel 14. The distance between the spaced adjacent rods which defines the side walls of the channel is less than the dis tance of the two webs which partly define the channel thereby defining a constricting opening which will prevent tissue or particulate matter from getting into the channels and clogging them.

The strip drains disclosed are formed of a physiological inert elastomeric material preferably one of the family of silicone rubbers. Under certain circumstances organic rubbers made from butyl polymer or the natural polymer from the hevea tree could be utilized. The silicone rubbers which may be used in this invention can be either of the heat vulcanizing or room temmperature vulcanizing type. Since these rubbers are intended for medical purposes fillers, vulcanizing agents and other constituents should be chosen for their nontoxic physiological, inert characteristics. The drains are formed by well known extrusion processes.

That which is claimed is:

l. A surgical drain comprising a series of rods lying on two horizontal planes, the rods of one plane staggered in relation to the rods on the other plane, the rods on the same plane in spaced relation to each other and the rods on the plane connected to adjacent rods on the other plane by a web the drain adapted to be torn along a web on a line substantially parallel to a rod and adjacent rods are in acute angular relation to each other.

2. A surgical drain formed of elastomeric material having a series of spaced channels substantially wedge shaped in cross section defined by walls, each of the walls comprising a first rod portion and a second rod portion connected by a web portion wherein the first rod portion lies on the first plane and the second rod portion lies on a second plane spaced from the first plane and the first rod portion is in staggered relation to the second rod portion.

3. A drain as set forth in claim 2 wherein the distance between the surface of the first rod portion of the one wall and the surface of the rod portion of the other wall is less than the distance between the webs of the walls.

4. A surgical drain as set forth in claim 3 wherein the drain is adapted to be torn along a web on a line substantially parallel to a rod portion and adjacent webs are in acute angular relation to each other.

UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION PATENT NO. 1 3,860,008

DATED 3 January 14, 1975 INVEN O I Kenneth G. Miner, Thomas -D. Talcott, James B.

Davidson, David B. Batdorf It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 2, line 47, the phrase "on the plane" should read -on one planeigncd and Scaled this Eighteenth D a y Of August I98] [SEAL] Amer.-

GERALD J. MOSSINGHOFF Attestulg Oflicer Commissioner 0 f Parents and Trademarks

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2134152 *Jan 6, 1937Oct 25, 1938Ludwig SchwarzmayrWound drain-strip
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4523920 *Dec 5, 1983Jun 18, 1985Sil-Fab CorporationSurgical suction drain
US4579555 *Dec 5, 1983Apr 1, 1986Sil-Fab CorporationSurgical gravity drain having aligned longitudinally extending capillary drainage channels
US5178604 *May 31, 1990Jan 12, 1993Iovision, Inc.Glaucoma implant
US5397300 *Apr 21, 1994Mar 14, 1995Iovision, Inc.Glaucoma implant
US5476445 *Aug 1, 1994Dec 19, 1995Iovision, Inc.Glaucoma implant with a temporary flow restricting seal
US5558629 *Jul 21, 1992Sep 24, 1996Iovision, Inc.Glaucoma implant
US6050970 *May 8, 1997Apr 18, 2000Pharmacia & Upjohn CompanyMethod and apparatus for inserting a glaucoma implant in an anterior and posterior segment of the eye
US6478789Nov 15, 1999Nov 12, 2002Allegiance CorporationWound drain with portals to enable uniform suction
US6866657Jul 4, 2002Mar 15, 2005Semyon ShchervinskyDrain catheters
US7207965Jun 16, 2004Apr 24, 2007Solx, Inc.Shunt for the treatment of glaucoma
US7658735Feb 9, 2010Spehalski Stephan RSteerable wound drain device
US7678090Mar 16, 2010Risk Jr James RWound treatment apparatus
US7723560Dec 20, 2002May 25, 2010Lockwood Jeffrey SWound vacuum therapy dressing kit
US7763000Jul 6, 2004Jul 27, 2010Risk Jr James RWound treatment apparatus having a display
US7794438Sep 14, 2010Alan Wayne HenleyWound treatment apparatus
US7867206Sep 19, 2003Jan 11, 2011Kci Licensing, Inc.Vacuum therapy and cleansing dressing for wounds
US7896856 *Dec 20, 2002Mar 1, 2011Robert PetrosenkoWound packing for preventing wound closure
US7896864Mar 12, 2007Mar 1, 2011Lockwood Jeffrey SVented vacuum bandage with irrigation for wound healing and method
US7910791May 15, 2001Mar 22, 2011Coffey Arthur CCombination SIS and vacuum bandage and method
US7927318Sep 20, 2005Apr 19, 2011Risk Jr James RobertWaste container for negative pressure therapy
US7988680Aug 2, 2011Kci Medical ResourcesVacuum therapy and cleansing dressing for wounds
US8021348Sep 5, 2006Sep 20, 2011Kci Medical ResourcesWound treatment apparatus
US8168848Dec 20, 2002May 1, 2012KCI Medical Resources, Inc.Access openings in vacuum bandage
US8246592Aug 21, 2012Kci Medical ResourcesVacuum therapy and cleansing dressing for wounds
US8350116Dec 4, 2008Jan 8, 2013Kci Medical ResourcesVacuum bandage packing
US8353856Jan 15, 2013Abbott Medical Optics Inc.Glaucoma drainage shunts and methods of use
US8540687Aug 20, 2010Sep 24, 2013Kci Licensing, Inc.Wound treatment apparatus
US8545481Jan 28, 2010Oct 1, 2013Allegiance CorporationSteerable wound drain device
US8702639Mar 25, 2010Apr 22, 2014Abbott Medical Optics Inc.Glaucoma shunts with flow management and improved surgical performance
US8747887Oct 3, 2005Jun 10, 2014Kci Medical ResourcesCombination SIS and vacuum bandage and method
US8834453Aug 26, 2013Sep 16, 2014Allegiance CorporationSteerable wound drain device
US8920357Dec 13, 2012Dec 30, 2014Abbott Medical Optics Inc.Glaucoma drainage shunts and methods of use
US20040006331 *Jul 4, 2002Jan 8, 2004Semyon ShchervinskyDrain catheters
US20040064111 *Sep 19, 2003Apr 1, 2004Lockwood Jeffrey S.Vacuum therapy and cleansing dressing for wounds
US20040243073 *Dec 20, 2002Dec 2, 2004Lockwood Jeffrey S.Wound vacuum therapy dressing kit
US20040249360 *Jan 12, 2004Dec 9, 2004Spehalski Stephan R.Steerable wound drain device
US20040254521 *Jun 16, 2004Dec 16, 2004Solx, Inc.Shunt for the treatment of glaucoma
US20050165385 *Jan 24, 2005Jul 28, 2005Solx, Inc.Glaucoma treatment method
US20060015087 *Sep 20, 2005Jan 19, 2006Risk James R JrWaste container for negative pressure therapy
US20060029650 *Oct 3, 2005Feb 9, 2006Coffey Arthur CCombination SIS and vacuum bandage and method
US20060041247 *Dec 20, 2002Feb 23, 2006Robert PetrosenkoWound packing for preventing wound closure
US20070156104 *Mar 12, 2007Jul 5, 2007Lockwood Jeffrey SVented vacuum bandage with irrigation for wound healing and method
US20070233022 *Jun 11, 2007Oct 4, 2007Hill-Rom Services, Inc.Wound treatment apparatus
US20090082740 *Dec 4, 2008Mar 26, 2009Lockwood Jeffrey SVacuum bandage packing
US20100106117 *Nov 13, 2009Apr 29, 2010Kci Medical ResourcesVacuum therapy and cleansing dressing for wounds
US20100114006 *Nov 5, 2008May 6, 2010Advanced Medical Optics, Inc.Glaucoma drainage shunts and methods of use
US20100198171 *Aug 5, 2010Spehalski Stephan RSteerable wound drain device
US20100249691 *Mar 25, 2010Sep 30, 2010Abbott Medical Optics Inc.Glaucoma shunts with flow management and improved surgical performance
US20100312202 *Aug 20, 2010Dec 9, 2010Alan Wayne HenleyWound Treatment Apparatus
EP0059620A1 *Feb 26, 1982Sep 8, 1982Larry Webster BlakeWound drain catheter
EP1545644A1 *Dec 20, 2002Jun 29, 2005Hill-Rom Services, Inc.Wound packing for preventing wound closure
WO2010121593A1 *Apr 16, 2010Oct 28, 2010Iskia Gmbh & Co. KgAreal drainage for draining wound secretion from large-surface-area wounds and from body cavities
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/93.1
International ClassificationA61M27/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M27/00
European ClassificationA61M27/00