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Publication numberUS3860161 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 14, 1975
Filing dateFeb 1, 1973
Priority dateFeb 7, 1972
Also published asDE2303372A1, DE2303373A1, DE2303434A1, DE2303435A1, US3820266
Publication numberUS 3860161 A, US 3860161A, US-A-3860161, US3860161 A, US3860161A
InventorsBoye Erhard Rudolf, Engstrom Per Ingemar
Original AssigneeGunnebo Bruks Ab
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cartridge tool with pocket arranged under the barrel
US 3860161 A
Images(6)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Engstrom et al.

atent [191 CARTRIDGE TOOL WITH POCKET ARRANGED UNDER THE BARREL [73] Assignee: Gunnebo Bruks Aktiebolag,

Gunnebobruk, Sweden [22] Filed: Feb. 1, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 328,640

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Feb. 7, 1972 Sweden 1354/72 [52] US. Cl. 227/10 [51] Int. Cl. B25c 1/14 [58] I Field of Search 227/10, 11; 60/309, 637

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3.050,?32 8/1962 Termet l. 227/10 %l fl -s Jan. 14, 1975 Primary Examiner-Granville Y. Custer, Jr. Attorney, Agent, or Firml-1ane, Baxley & Spiecens [57] ABSTRACT There is disclosed a gun for driving nails, bolts, etc., by the force generated by detonating an explosive cartridge, the gun including a firing mechanism with a striker pin for detonating' the cartridge by operating the firing mechanism. The gun comprises a jacketed gun barrel including one or more recesses which are connected with a pocket below the barrel so that the gases generated upon firing of the gun can escape through said recesses into the pocket and then an annular space outside the barrel and inside of the jacket. Finally, the gases flow from the annular space through one or more axial ducts to an exhaust opening at the front end of the jacket.

4 Claims, 21 Drawing Figures PAIENTH] JAN 1 41975 SHEET 1 UF 6' PATUHEUMHJ 4M5 3,860,161

sum 2 or 6 FIG. 6

CARTRIDGE TOOL WITH POCKET ARRANGED UNDER THE BARREL The present invention relates to a cartridge tool for nails and bolts. With such tools, which use propellant cartridges containing explosive charges, it is necessary to deflect the gases formed after the firing in such a way that the resulting noise is reduced as much as possible. There is also a problem of eliminating operation failures caused by soot particles in the exhaust gases. An object of the present invention is to reduce such noise substantially in comparison with that generated by cartridge tools available in the market, as well as to remove soot particles in such a way that these do not cause operational failures.

According to the invention the soot particles are removed by being deflected immediately from the barrel to a chamber below the barrel, where they are collected to be emptied out when a certain quantity has been collected. The noise is reduced by conveying the gases via the soot chamber to an annular region defined by the outer surface of the barrel and the inner surface of a barrel surrounding jacket. Within the annular region the exhaust gases are given an axial movement in a forward direction, i.e., towards the muzzle of the cartridge too]. At the front end the annular region is divided up into a number of axial channels made by axial ribs being arranged on one of the envelope surfaces of the space. The channels are arranged so that phase shifts are introduced to reduce the noise by means of sound wave cancellations. The channels emerge at the front end of the jacket and are deflected radially by a peripheral flange.

In the following, a complete cartridge tool embodying the present invention will be described, with reference to the accompanying drawings,

in which FIG. 1 shows a complete cartridge tool,

in which FIG. 2 shows where in the cartridge tool a cartridge case ejector is arranged,

in which FIGS. 3 and 4 show two illustrations demonstrating the cartridge case ejector in two different operating positions,

in which FIGS. Sand 6 show a snap arrangement for fixing a nail with guide washer in two differentoperating positions,

in which FIGS. 7, 8 and 9 show a muzzle part with the surrounding sleeve of the cartridge tool,

in which FIGS. 10 and 11 show the front end of the cartridge tool,

in which FIGS. 12 and 13 show a cartridge chamber with a cartridge for the tool before and after the cartridge has been fired,

in which FIGS. 14 and 15 shows the trigger mechanism in two different operating positions,

in which FIGS. 16 and 17 show the coaction between a guide pin engaging a groove in the barrel of the cartridge tool and the groove in two different relative positions,

in which FIGS. 18, 19 and 20 more completely show the coaction between the pin according to FIGS. 16

v and 17 and a striker piston in three different relative positions, and

in which FIG. 21 shows how said pin is actuated transversally.

In FIGS. I and 2 of the reference designation 1 shows a tool body section made of a single piece of metal. This part has a handle part 2 and from the handle part there is a part 3 directed axially forwards, at the top of which there is a guide part 4 with a more or less cylindrical hole for guiding a barrel 68 to move axially along the hole. To the right of the handle part 2 a housing 6 is arranged for a trigger mechanism 7. The housing is provided with an axial hole', which is coaxial with the hole in the part 4. The part 8 between the guide part 4 and the housing 6 has the character of a cradle. A cross section of the cradle shows that it has a semicircular form and that the inner envelope surface of the cradle forms a joining envelope surface between the inner envelope surface of the guide part 4 and the inner envelope surface of the housing 6. A cylindrical lining 9 is disposed within guide part 4 and housing 6. The lining 9 is cutaway at the region 8 so that a saddle or cradle-like lining is formed. At its front end the cylinder lining'has a radial flange l0, directed outwards (See FIG. 11). The rear end of the cylinder lining protrudes outside the housing 6. The protruding part is provided with external threads 11. A casing 12 with internal threads 13 is screwed on to the threads 11. The handle part 2, at its rear end, is provided with a coherent member 14 which can be made of, for instance, some elastic material, such as rubber or plastic. The member 14 also covers the casing 12 and part of the outer surface of the housing 6. The elastic material has the function of absorbing part of the recoil force. In particular, it is made of elastic and resilient material of considerable thickness so that themember 14 at the back of the handle will be compressed by the recoil and absorb energy to attenuate the recoil force. The coherent member 14, of elastic material, is secured to the handle part 2 with the aid of a threaded screw 15.

The firing mechanism consists of a cylindrical unit 16 having a transverse hole 17. A bolt 18 is inserted in the hole 17. Disposed between the inner end of the bolt and the bottom of the hole is a spring 19. The bolt 18 has a transverse hole 20, in which is inserted the front end of a striker pin member 21. At the top of the hole there is a catch for the striker pin member 21 disen gaged when the bolt 18 moves rearwards. At its front end of the striker pin member 21 has a striker pin 22. The left side of the hole 20 is delimited by a wall 23, provided with a hole 24, of appropriate size so that the striker pin 22 can be placed in the hole with a small portion protruding beyond the left side of the wall 23. AT its lower end the bolt 18 has a lug 25, which slides in an axial groove 26 in the cylinder lining 9. In this way the cylindrical unit 16, because of the lug 25 is constrained to move in the lining 9 only in the longitudinal direction of the groove 26 and between its end positions. The cylindrical unit 16 has a part which is recessed so that a transverse contact surface 27 is formed. The recessed part 28 has the character of a cylinder. One end of a helical spring 29 bears against the contact surface 27. The other end of the spring bears against the transverse flange 30 of a member which forms flange 30, and a tubular part 31. The tubular part 31 has a contact surface 32. The tubular part 31 forms a passage for the striker pin member 21, which at its rear end has a flange 33, which can be brought to bear against contact surface 32. The striker pin member 21 is provided with a spring 34 having one end which bears against the left end of the striker pin member 21, and another end which bears against the inner wall of the casing 12. The tubular part 31 is encircled by three rings 35, 36 and 37, which bear against the transverse flange 30 and the bottom of the casing 12. These three rings are of elastic material, and are capable of absorbing recoil forces.

at the top of end can coact with the lug 25 of the 4 bolt 18. The two-armed lever 41 is arranged so that it I can pivot around an axle 43, which is arranged in the handle part 2. The other end 44 of the two-armed lever 41, via an axel 45 has a two-armed arm 46 supported on it, with one arm 47 directed more or less downwards and the other arm 48 which is more or less horizontal. The horizontal arm 48 is aaranged in an axial groove 49 running through the two-armed lever 41. The arm 47 which is directed downwards has an oval groove 50. Through the hole there is a pin 51. The pin is arranged in a trigger 52. The trigger is movable axially in the through hole 38, and has a more or less vertical hole 53 for the arm 47 which is directed downwards. At its rear end the trigger 53 has a hole 54, which extends more or less axially. One end of a helical spring 55 bears against the bottom of the hole 54 and the other end of the spring bears against the bottom of a hole 56, arranged in the coherent member 14. The helical spring causes the trigger to be always in its front position, at the same time as the two-armed lever 41 is caused to be in its lower position.

In the cylindrical unit, as will be noted from FIG. 2, a groove 57 has been cut down from the envelope surface. The groove has an axial direction, so that an arm 58 can be placed in the groove 57. From the ends of the arm 58, two arms 59 and 60 extend, as will be noted from FIGS. 3 and 4. The last-mentioned two arms have a transverse direction in relation to the arm 58 and are moreover substantially directed towards the center axis of the cylindrical unit 16. At its front end, the arm 60 is shaped into a claw 61, intended to coact with a flange 62 of a cartridge case 63. At the upper endof the arm 59 there is a cut-down section 64. Part of one end of the helical spring 29 rests against cut-down section 64. The arm 59 penetrates into a groove 65 made in the striker pin member 21. The arm 59 is made with a point 66, which point is in contact with the front cross wall 67 of the groove 65, so that the helical spring 29 will impart a moment directed forwards to the arm 58, so

- that the point 61 can snap in, in front of the front side of the flange 62.

A barrel 68 is arranged so that it can be displaced axially in the cylindrical lining 9 (see FIG. 1). At its rear end the barrel has a chamber 69, the front end of which emerges into a bore 70 of the barrel. At its front end the barrel 68 has internal threads 71, which coact with external threads 72 of a muzzle part 73, which has a bore 74 with a diameter substantially corresponding to the head 100 of a nail 99. At its front end the muzzle part 73 has a diameter junction, so that a bore 75 with a greater diameter is obtained, i.e., a diameter corre- 74. The barrel 68 has a through axial groove 78 arranged in a vertical plane through the barrel 68. In the groove a spring actuated lug 79 (see FIGS. 1 and 18) is inserted, which limits the movement of the barrel 68 towards the left so that the lug 79 in one position can be in contact with the rear end and wall 80 of the groove 78. In this position the rear end of the barrel 68 mainly coincides with the rear end of the guide part 4. The lug 79 moreover is inserted so far into the bore 70 that it can be made to come into contact with the more or less transversal bearing surface 81 of the rear part 76. In the front end of the bore 74 and in front of the lug 79 a ring 82 of elastic material is arranged, and in front of this and in contact with the rear end of the ring there is a flange-like part 83 of a tubular part 84. The tubular part 84 has a groove 85 for the lug 79. The barre] 68 has a step 200 on its underneath side at the groove 78, so that when the lug is completely inserted in the barrel 68 it can move rearwards but not forwards (See FIG. 17).

In the part of the barrel 68 which is directed straight forward under the groove 78 there is arranged axial groove 86, which emerges into a pocket 87. Above the groove 86 the lining 9 is provided with a through groove 86A, for which a number of through holes can be substituted. The pocket 87 is intended to be covered with a side cover or the like which, for instance, is fastened to the pivot 88. The pocket is also shown in FIGS. 10 and 11. The lining 9 has a peripheral bead 89, which has a more or less rectangular cross section. Between the envelope surface of the lining 9 and the guide part 4 to the left of the peripheral bead, an annular space 90 is arranged, which is limited by the inner envelope surface of the guide part 4. Around its outer envelope surface the lining has longitudinally extending axial ribs 91, originating from a point on the lining located between the ends 4 of the guide part. The axial ribs extend up to the front end of the guide part 4. The upper sides of the axial ribs are in contact with the inner envelope. surface of the guide part 4. In this way the lining in the guide part 4 obtains a number of axial channels around its periphery in which the exhaust gases of the bolt gun are distributed. As the flange 10 is at a certain distance from the front end of the guide part 4, an exhaust opening 92 for said channels is obtained. A space corresponding to the space 90 can be arranged between the front edge of the ribs 91 and said exhaust opening.

The muzzle part 73 has a relatively shallow peripheral recess 93, as shown in FIGS. 5 and 6. In the left part of the muzzle part, which is not recessed, there is an axial, shallow groove 94, which extends to the left from the recess 93. In the front end of this groove, i.e., at its left end, there is a radial hole 95, in which a ball 96 is placed. The lower end of the hole is slightly constricted, so that the ball cannot leave the hole and become lodged in the bore part 75. Around the muzzle part 73 and then at the recess 93 a peripheral band 97 is placed. From one edge of the band a tongue 98 extends to the left along the axial groove 94. The tongue then covers the hole 95, so that the ball cannot be dislodged upwards. The band 97 and the tongue 98 are of such material that the tongue always strives to press the ball 96 downwards. The function of the ball 96 is to snap aside at the insertion of a nail 99 with a nail head 100 and a guide washer 101 into the bores 74 and 75 which are arranged one after the other. When the ball has snapped aside, the nail 99 is retained in the bore. The advantage of this design compared with other designs is that the recess in the front part of the muzzle part 73 will be considerably smaller, which gives the front part greater strength. When other designs are used for retaining the ball 96, substantially greater recesses have had to be made. The arrangement described for retaining the ball 96 can of course be applied generally at muzzle parts for any arbitrary bolt guns whatsoever.

The muzzle part 73 is encircled by a collar 102 consisting of a front part 103 and a rear part 104, which is also shown in FIGS. 7 9. The rear end 104 is intended to have its edge in contact with the flange 10. A certain portion of the front part of the muzzle part 73 then protrudes out in front of the front edge of the part 103. In order to release the safety of the bolt gun, the front end of the muzzle part must be pressed in to such an extent that its front part coincides with the front edge of the part 103. On its inner envelope surface the part 104 has two radial flanges 105 and 106, directed inwards. These flanges have two surfaces facing each other, which are parallel with each other. A cross section through the flanges gives an internal hole with two straight parallel sides and two curved sides facing each other. On the muzzle part 73, there is a disc-shaped part 107 which forms a peripheral raised section in front of the external threads 72. The disc-shaped part 107 has four axial flat surfaces 108, 109, 110 and 111. The surfaces 108 and 110 are at a distance from each other which mainly corresponds to the distance between the inner edges of the flange parts 105 and 106. The distance between the surfaces 109 and 111 is the same. At the left end of the surfaces 111 and 109, two curved flanges 112 and 113 are arranged, the curvature then approximately corresponding to the internal diameter of the part 104. When the muzzle part 73 is inserted into the collar 102, the flanges 112 and l 13 must obtain the position shown in FIG. 8. When the flanges 112 and 113 have passed the flanges 105 and 106, and the disc-shaped part 107 is to the left of the flanges 105 and 106 which are directed downwards, they can be turned 90. Thereafter the muzzle part 73 can be moved from contact through the flanges 112 and 113 against the flanges 105 and 106 to contact with the contact surface 114. Due to the existence of the flanges 105 and 106-and the surfaces 108 to 11 it is possible with the aid of the collar 102 to screw on the muzzle part 73-to the barrel 68. The collar 102 thus has three functions, viz. to serve as a cover, to serve as a member which determines how far the barrel 68 should be moved rearwards in order that the safety device of the bolt guns shall be released, and to serve as a member with the aid of which the muzzle part 73 can be unscrewed from or screwed on the barrel 68. The collar cannot move the bolt gun or release the safety. In its rearmost position of the collar leaves part of the front end of the muzzle part 73 uncovered. However, this part is not sufficient to provide a grip for a user. The collar 102 described can of course have applications also on bolt guns of types other then the present one.

At the rear end of the barrel 68 a cylindrical hole 115 is arranged for the flange 62 of a cartridge 63 with a cylindrical main body 117 and a front more or less conical and folded part 118 (see FIGS. 12 and 13). The main body 117 is placed in a cylindrical hole 119 which has a diameter mainly corresponding to the diameter of the cylindrical main body 117. The cylindrical hole 119 is followed to the left by a conical hole 120 with an inner edge 116. The conical hole 120 thereafter goes over into a hole 121 for transmission of the powder gases developed from the cartridge when this has been initiated. The taper of the conical hole and the length of the cylindrical hole have been chosen in such a way that when the cartridge has been initiated the front edge 122 of the conical hole will function as a breaking edge, which involves that the folded front part 118 will be transformed into a conical part 123 and a tubular part 124. In this way, the front part of the cartridge will not become jammed in the chamber, nor will any residue be deposited in the chamber 69, which can make the chamber tighter and thereby cause cartridges subsequently loaded to be jammed in the chamber. At the chamber 69 the barrel 68 has an axial groove, which is radial, so that the arm 60 can obtain the contact shown in FIG. 4. The design described of the cartridge chamber is not limited for use in the present type of bolt gun, but can have general application.

The previously described triggered mechanism has been described to a rather great extent, but not sufficiently, however, and therefore, in the following, the trigger mechanism will be described in more detail (see FIGS. 14 and 15). The horizontal arm 48 can move in an axial groove 49 in the two-armed lever 41 and its free end can be caused to come into contact with the outer envelope surface of the casing 9. The appearance of the groove will perhaps best be noted from FIG. 2. The lug 25 for the bolt 18 has two oblique surfaces, which are transversal, and have the referencedesignation 125 and 126. The inclination of the surfaces is max. 80. In the longitudinal section the lug 25 has a dove-tail character. The lug 42 has an oblique front side surface 127 with an inclination of 80, for coaction with the side surface 126 of the lug 25. The other end 44 of the lever 41 has an oblique contact surface 128 for coaction with an oblique or chamfered surface 129 in the upper left-hand side of the through hole 53. When the trigger 52 is moved towards the left, the oblique contact surface 128 is caused to slide along the chamfer 129, which involves that the part 44 of he twoarmed lever 41 obtains-a movement upwards, at the same time as the end 40 of the. lever obtains a movementdownwards.

FIG. 16 shows the front part of the barrel 68 and also its axial groove 78 and the inserted lug 79. The lug 79 has a more or less rectangular cross section, and a width mainly corresponding to the width of the groove. Outside the groove 78 the lug changes over into a part 130 which cannot enter into the groove 78. The part 130 can appropriately be given a cylindrical form, and in the barrel 68 two recesses 131 and 132 have been made on either side of the groove 78, and then in the outer envelope surface of the barrel. The prupose of this is to achieve a guide groove for the part 130. The part 130 thus tits in the groove formed by the recesses 131 and 132. At its left end the groove formed has an inclined cross wall 134, which involves that the part 130, when moving towards the left, can slide upwards on the inclined wall 134 and can be caused to come into direct contactwith the outer envelope surface of the barrel. The groove formed by the recesses 131 and 132 has a cross wall 133 to the right, which is at right angles to the axis of the barrel 68. This involves that when the part 130 moves to the right, the part is caused to come into contact with the cross wall 133, and has no possibility of sliding up on the envelope surface of the barrel. The contact of the part 130 against the cross wall 133 will be noted from FIG. 17. FIG. 18 shows how the part 130 is movably arranged in the transversal direction in a lining 135, which is arranged in part 3, in a hole. The lining 135 is screwed into a hole in the tubular lining 9. At its bottom, the lining 135 has an end wall 136. At the bottom, the part 130 changes over into a more or less cylindrical journal formed part 137, which passes through a hole 138 in the end wall 136. The journal formed part 137 has its lower end supported in a transversal grip part 139, and then by means of a shaft 140, which goes through the transversal grip part 139 and the journal formed part 137. The transversal grip part has two grip surfaces 141 and 142, which will be located on either side of the bolt gun, as shown in FIG. 1. The grip part 139 is in contact with the outer side of the end wall 136. If one of the grip surfaces 141 and 142, for instance the grip surface 142, is actuated'by a finger 143 (seeFIG. 21) the part 130 will be caused to move downwards so far that the part 130 will leave the groove formed by'the recesses 131 and 132, i.e., the barrel 68 has the possibility of moving forwards until the lug 79 comes into contact with the end wall 80 of the groove 78. At said actuation, the portion of the grip part to the left of the shul't 140 will function as a pivot for a lever formed by the grip part 139. The purpose of the spring 144 is to return the part 130 to its original position.

The ring of elastic material 82 and the tubular part 84 serve the purpose of braking up the forwards movement of the striker bolt 77, as the contact surface 81 comes into contact with the right end edge of the tubular part 84 (see FIG. 20). The tubular part 84 also serves the purpose of protecting the lug 79 from being destroyed through the rear part 76. The parts 82 and 84 can be used generally in bolt guns.

The bolt gun described above functions in the following way. It is assumed that through a depression of the transverse grip part 139 the barrel has been able to moveso far to the left that the lug 79 is in contact with the end wall 80. In this situation the striker bolt77 assumes its rear position in the bore 70. A cartridge 63 is'now inserted in the chamber 63. The barrel 68 is thereafter moved towards the right end until the part 130 comes into contact with the end wall 133, as is clearly shown in FIGS. 17 and 18. A nail 99 with a nail head 100 and with a guide washer 101 is inserted in the bores 74 and 75. In order that the nail with guide washer shall remain in place in the bores 74 and 75 the guide washer for the nail must pass by a locking ball 96, which is actuated by a tongue 98, so that part of the ball penetrates into the bore 75 The tongue 98 is spring actuated. When the nail is inserted in the bores 74 and 75, the ball 96 is caused to snap aside, against the spring actuation, when the guide washer passes by. When the guide washer has passed, the ball again falls down and blocks the movement of the guide washer towards the left. The nail is thereby retained in the bore, and is ready to be fired. It should be obvious that the nail can be inserted first and thereafter the cartridge.

In the situation described the barrel assumes such a position that the oblique surface 126 of the lug 25 is located in front of thhe oblique surface 127 of the lug 42. Thus, firing cannot take place. If the collar 104 has its rear end in contact with the flange 10, the muzzle part 74 is protruding so far from the front end of the collar as is required to position the lug 25 directly under the lug 42. If the front end of the muzzle part 73 is now pressed against the surface into which a nail is to be driven, against the action of the helical springs 29 and 34, the barrel 68 will move rearwards so that the left end surface 103 of the collar 102 will be caused to coincide with the left end surface of the muzzle part. The bolt gun is now ready to be fired, i.e., the lug 42 is |ocated directly under the lug 25. When firing, the trig er 52 is moved to the right, against the action of the spring 55. The journal 51 of the trigger then moves the arm 47, so that the arm 47 pulls down the left part 44 of the lever 41, causing the right-hand part 40 to urge up the bolt 18 so far that the striker pin member 21 is released for a movement towards the left, and the striker pin 22 passes through the hole 24 and sets off the cartridge 63. Due to the lever system, very little force is required on the trigger 52 in order to move the bolt 18 which, for safety reasons, is actuated by a very powerful spring. When the firing has taken place, the spring 55 presses the trigger 52 towards the left. At this movement the oblique contact surface 128 will slide along the chamfered surface 129 causing the lever 41 to be turned clockwise, so that the lug 42 ceases to coact with the lug'25. The trigger 52 with the arms is now ready for it new firing. At the firing of the cartridge 63 the striker bolt 76 and its front part 77 will move towards the left, to drive in the nail 99 with the part 77. At the movement of the striker bolt towards the left, the bolt is caught up by the contact surface 81 at the right end of the tubular part 84. Because of the elastic ring 82, the bolt 76 is caught up gently. The exhaust gases from the cartridge 63 pass through the groove 78 and the groove 86A underneath in the lining 9 and the groove 86 in the part 3 to the pocket 87, where the gases make have a vortex movement downwards and thereafter pass up to the left of the peripheral bead 89, after which they are given anaxial direction forwards in the space between the outer envelope surface of the lining 9 and the inner envelope surface of the guide part 4. Owing to the existence of the axial ribs, the gases are distributed out into a number of channels, which emerge into the space 92 and thereafter out into the open air. Due to the passage through the channels, the gas is divided into separate jets which pass through the channels formed by ribs 91 and are phase shifted in relation to each other. When the gases pass through the pocket 87, the powder residue is left in the pocket. This residue can be removed from the bolt gun when the cover over the pocket is removed. By distributing the gases to a number of channels, which are formed by the ribs, a silencing effect is obtained. Both the residue collecting pocket and the silencer can each be applied generally in bolt guns.

When the cartridge 63 is tired, a recoil occurs. Its effect is dampened by the member 14, which is of elastic material. The recoil is further dampened by the three rings 35, 36 and 37, which are of elastic material.

When the nail has been driven in, the transversal grip part 139 is given a downward movement through a tinger 143 through actuation downwards on either of the grip surfaces 141 or 142, and the cylindrical part 130 is then caused to leave the groove formed by the recesses 131 and 132. The barrel 68 can then be moved to wards the left, all the way to coming into contact with the end wall 80. This movement of the barrel towards the left can be obtained either by allowing the barrel to fall down of its own weight, or by giving the barrel a centrifugal force. The barrel can also be pulled out. At the movement of the barrel towards the left, the striker piston is retained in a stationary position in the bolt gun due to the lug 79. This involves that during the movement of the barrel towards the left a relative displacement between the striker piston and the barrel takes place, so that the striker piston with its bolt will be returned to its original position. When this has taken place, the bolt gun is loaded anew with cartridge and nail, and the barrel is returned to the position where the barrel and nail are ready for driving a new nail.

As previously mentioned, the purpose of the collar 104 is to protect the muzzle part 73 as well as to regulate the length of the distance which the barrel must be pushed rearwards in order to release the safety of the bolt gun. The muzzle part 73 is thus movable in relation to the collar 102. The collar 102 has the further property that it can be used for screwing in the muzzle part 73 at the barrel 68. This is possible as soon as the discformed part 107 with two opposite flat surfaces is in contact with the corresponding surfaces 105 and 106 of the flanges.

When the barrel 68 with the cartridge 63 in the chamber 69 is moved rearwards towards the cylindrical unit 16, the arm 60 will be moved into an axial groove in the rear end of the barrel, so that the claw 61 will snap out in front of the front side surface of the flange 62. In this situation the flange is in contact with the front cross surface of the cylindrical unit 16. When the barrel then, at the actuation of the grip part 139, is given a movement forwards, the cartridge 63 will be re- .tained by the claw 61, and the cartridge case will then fall out from the gun, or can be removed by hand.

We claim:

1. In a cartridge tool including a cartridge chamber for receiving cartridges and communicating with a barrel which axially guides a striker piston, the barrel being circumferentially surrounded by a housing and extending beyond the end of the housing, the housing being spaced from the barrel to define an annular region and being fixed to a support member which includes the handle of the tool, the improvement com prising, an opening in the barrel adjacent to the cartridge chamber, a cyclonic type soot trap in the support member having an entrance opening which communicates with the opening in the barrel, the soot trap being configured with a circular wall and a central post to induce vortex motion in gases entering the entrance opening and the soot trap having an exit opening which communicates with the region between the barrel and the housing whereby the gases entering the soot trap are constrained to circle one full time before exiting.

2. The cartridge tool of claim 1 wherein said soot trap is an open cavity in said support member and has a cover removably supported by said central post.

3. The cartridge tool of claim 2 further comprising a plurality of axially extending ribs which are disposed circumferentially around the annular region between the housing and the barrel to define a plurality of passageways for introducing phase shifts in the sound waves resulting from the firing of a cartridge as it exits the front end of the housing.

4. The cartridge tool of claim 3 further comprising deflecting means for directing the sound waves transversally outward as they exit from said region.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3997096 *Mar 7, 1975Dec 14, 1976Hilti AktiengesellschaftArrangement for cooling an explosive charge-driven setting gun
US4196834 *Dec 11, 1978Apr 8, 1980Olin CorporationNoise reducer for powder actuated fastening tool
US4354540 *Sep 8, 1980Oct 19, 1982Jefferson Robert TScrew holder system
US4655380 *Sep 25, 1985Apr 7, 1987Pneutek, Inc.Powder-actuated fastener-driving tool
US4821938 *Nov 25, 1987Apr 18, 1989Haytayan Harry MPowder-actuated fastener driving tool
US4883213 *Oct 5, 1988Nov 28, 1989Societe De Prospection Et D'inventions Techniques (S.P.I.T.)Explosive diving tool apparatus with improved extractor
US5269450 *Feb 10, 1993Dec 14, 1993Illinois Tool Works, Inc.Hammer-strikable, powder-actuated, fastener-driving tool
US5310108 *Jun 21, 1993May 10, 1994Illinois Tool Works Inc.Hammer-strikable, powder-actuated, fastener-driving tool
US5465893 *Jan 20, 1995Nov 14, 1995Thompson William JImpact actuated tool for driving fasteners with safety mechanism
US5518161 *Mar 22, 1995May 21, 1996Illinois Tool Works, Inc.Impact actuated tool with configurable muzzle for driving varying length fasteners
US6905055 *Oct 27, 2003Jun 14, 2005Hilti AktiengesellschaftSetting tool
US6921008 *Sep 7, 2004Jul 26, 2005Hilti AktiengesellschaftSetting tool
US7562801Aug 22, 2005Jul 21, 2009The Stanley WorksStapler with guide
US8087561 *Oct 20, 2009Jan 3, 2012Lee Cheng-HoPowder-actuated fastener-driving device capable of power adjustment
Classifications
U.S. Classification227/10
International ClassificationF41C3/06, F41A21/00, B25F5/00, F41C3/00, B25C1/14, F41A21/10, B25C1/10, B25C1/00, B25C1/18
Cooperative ClassificationF41C3/06, B25C1/105, B25C1/14, B25C1/188, B25C1/143, F41A21/10, B25F5/006
European ClassificationF41C3/06, B25C1/14B, B25C1/18C, B25C1/10B, F41A21/10, B25C1/14, B25F5/00E