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Publication numberUS3860365 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 14, 1975
Filing dateMay 3, 1973
Priority dateMay 3, 1973
Also published asCA1011257A1, DE2421495A1
Publication numberUS 3860365 A, US 3860365A, US-A-3860365, US3860365 A, US3860365A
InventorsBibbens William H
Original AssigneeBibbens William H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Seals and methods and means of sealing for rotary engines and the like
US 3860365 A
Abstract
A sealing assembly for providing a sliding seal between two members, such as the housing and rotor of a rotary engine. A groove is formed in one member and extends substantially transversely of the direction of movement of that member relative to the other member. The seal blade is received in the groove and has a tip portion which projects from the groove for sliding, sealing engagement with a surface of the other member. Cooperating cam surfaces are provided on the trailing side wall of the groove and the trailing side surface of the seal blade which are operable in response to forces urging the trailing side surface into contact with the trailing side wall to produce reaction force components urging the blade to extend from the groove. Coupling seal recesses are formed at opposite ends of the groove, and a coupling seal member is received in each of the recesses. The coupling seal member and seal blade are interengageable with each other in such a manner that the coupling seal members are urged to project axially from the respective coupling seal recesses while simultaneously urging the seal blade toward a centered position in the groove and to extend from the groove.
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United States Patent [191 Bibbens Jan. 14, 1975 SEALS AND METHODS AND MEANS OF SEALING FOR ROTARY ENGINES AND THE LIKE [76] Inventor: William H. Bibbens, 16500 N. Park Dr., Southfield, Mich. 48075 [22] Filed: May 3, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 356,885

[52] US. Cl 418/61 A, 418/113, 418/120, 418/122, 418/142 [51] Int. CL... F0lc 19/02, F04c 15/00, F040 27/00 [58] Field of Search 418/61 A, 113, 119124, 418/142, 237; 227/168 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,831,243 11/1931 Hart et al 418/237 3,127,095 3/1964 Froede 1 418/121 3,142,439 7/1964 Froede 418/61 A 3,180,560 4/1965 Paschke 418/124 3,180,561 4/1965 Paschke 418/120 3,204,615 9/1965 Starmuehler 418/113 3,206,108 9/1965 Abermeth 418/91 3,261,334 7/1966 Paschke 418/123 3,485,217 12/1969 lrgens 418/121 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 626,596 5/1927 France 418/122 993,574 5/1965 Great Britain 418/122 1,154,315 9/1963 Germany 418/142 Primary Examiner-John J. Vrablik Attorney, Agent, or FirmReising, Ethington & Perry [57] ABSTRACT A sealing assembly for providing a sliding seal between two members, such as the housing and rotor of a rotary engine. A groove is formed in one member and extends substantially transversely of the direction of movement of that member relative to the other member. The seal blade is received in the groove and has a tip portion which projects from the groove for sliding, sealing engagement with a surface of the other member. Cooperating cam surfaces are provided on the trailing side wall of the groove and the trailing side surface of the seal blade which are operable in response to forces urging the trailing side surface into contact with the trailing side wall to produce reaction force components urging the blade to extend from the groove. Coupling seal recesses are formed at opposite ends of the groove, and a coupling seal member is received in each of the recesses. The coupling seal member and seal blade are interengageable with each other in such a manner that the coupling seal members are urged to project axially from the respective coupling seal recesses while simultaneously urging the seal blade toward a centered positionin the groove and to extend from the groove.

43 Claims, 49 Drawing Figures PATEHTEB JAN 1 4 I975 SHEET Ul0F15 PATENTED 3,860,365

sum 02 or RATE OR PERCENT OF INCREASE IN VELOCITY FROM MINIMUM EAL x EAL Y EAL z .56 I80 60 I I 1 ,b 2o *y 26 as a .{zqj mo' I60" I 200' 220' 240' 260' 280' 300 320' 340 360" MIN. L VELOCITY -3so= ROTATION OF ROTOR PATENTEDJAH 1 41975 SHEET D30F 15 PATENTEDJANWQYB 3860.365

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SHEET 120! 15 "I\\ Z5 FIRlNG POSITION EXHAUST \j INTAKE (TM a fi m 2;

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SHEEI 1% HF 15 STA RT 0 F COM P RESSION START OF COM PRESSION EXPNSION F EXHAkJST 74 STA ESgIEN COMP PATENTEI] JAN I 4I975 SHEEI 15 0F 15 NEAR PEAK OF COMPRESSION F. OE M mT Am I S EXHAUST POSITION EXHAUST K +T\ NEAR PEAK OF \RESSION /#Z 4 ST NIT COMP a zze g 7 40 N EA R PEAK OF COMPRESSION INTAKE YF\ zxa SEALS AND METHODS AND MEANSOFSEALING FOR noranr ENGINES AND THE LIKE This invention relates generally to seals and methods and means of sealing as related to rotary machines and is particularly concerned with seals and means of sealing for relatively moving parts of eccentric rotor engines of the type commonly referred to as Wankel engines although the invention is not restricted to eccentric rotary engines and will have application to other types of machines, pumps, compressors and the like.

While the problem will be generally discussed below in connection with rotary engines of the Wankel type, the present invention is concerned with any device wherein it is necessary to provide slidable seals for use with moving pressure chambers, wherein the chambers are defined by two or more relatively moving members. Moreover, the invention in its broadest aspects is concerned with confining gases or fluidsbetween at least two zones of different pressures, and more specifically, with providing, by a sealing means and control features resistant to undesirable flow of gas or fluid from a high pressure zone to a low pressure zone between at least two relatively moving members Therefore, the phrase rotary engines and the like as used herein refers not only to eccentric rotor engines of the Wankel type, but to any device having relatively movable members wherein it is necessary to provide slidable seals between the relatively movable members to confine fluids between two or more zones of differential pressures.

Eccentric rotor engines are engines of the type wherein a rotor (sometimes referred to as a rotary piston") is eccentrically mounted within an enclosed cavity of a housing and is rotatable about its own axis, which axis is eccentric to a rotatable main shaft axis, the main shaft being mounted in the housing. The rotor cooperates with the cavity walls to define a plurality of chambers that expand and contract volumetrically as the rotor rotates within the cavity, and thereby provide the four phases of intake, compression, expansion (or ignition and expansion) and exhaust, to transmit power. The most commonly known eccentric rotor engine (not claimed as a part of this invention) is the type disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 2,998,065 of Wankel et al. The Wankel engine includes a housing having a cavity having a surface which is commonly referred to as a trochoidal surface, and will be so referred to herein. A rotor which may be of substantially triangular configuration, or of other configurations, is received in the cavity. The rotor has end faces extending transversely to its rotary axis, and has convex or formed sides extending between its apices. Each of the sides of the rotor cooperate with the trochoidal surfaceof the cavity to define a chamber, the walls of each chamber being defined by the trochoidal surface of the cavity, one of the convex or formed sides of the rotor, and the end walls of the housing that extend transversely to the trochoidal surface.

A difficult problem with rotary engines of the type discussed in the preceding paragraph is that of maintaining reliably effective sealing between chambers to contain variable and different pressures, which chambers are defined as the rotor rotates about an axis within the housing. Reliable seals must be provided between the end faces of the rotor and the opposing end wall surfaces of the housing as well as between the apex portions of the rotor and the trochoidal surface of the housing. In conventional rotary engines of this type, the apex portions of the rotor member are provided with apex seals that are slidably mounted in retaining grooves in the rotor, the retaining grooves having sides machined ina predetermined angular relationship with radial lines that extend from the axis of the rotor to each apex of the rotor so that, each apex seal moves outwardly and inwardly within its retaining groove as it sweeps along the trochoidal surface with which it is slidingly engaged. Side seals are provided within the opposite end faces of the rotor and extend between the apex portions of the rotor. The side seals engage the surfaces of the end walls of the cavity fixed to the rotor housing. In order to seal the ends of the apex portions of the rotor, coupling seals are slidably mounted within the end faces of the rotor for axial movement in a direction parallel to the axis of the rotor. The coupling seals also serve as a junction seal between the side seals and apex seals. The ends of the side seals abut the coupling seals, and theapex seals are received in grooves formed in the coupling seals. The coupling seals are conventionally of cylindrical shape and are received in cylindrical openings formed radially inwardly of the respective apices of the rotor. The coupling seal face seats against the adjacent end wall surface of the rotor housing and sweeps along such surface in a trochoidal path having generally the same configuration as the trochoidal surface of the cavity as the rotor rotates within the cavity. 7

In present constructions, the coupling seals, side seals, and. the apex seals are resiliently biased toward engagement with the respective surfaces against which they are toseal. It is important that each apex seal, side seal and coupling seal always remain in contact with their respective sealing surfaces; however, the seals should be. freely movable with respect to rotor in order to accommodate surface irregularities due to manufacturing tolerances, heat distortions, wear, etc, and so that the seals will always be free for quick return movement to maintain coactive contact with theirrespective sealing surfaces if caused to move out of contact therewith by adverse forces. If an apex seal is caused to move out of contact with the trochoidal surface, any frictional forces tending to retard its return movement to sealing engagement with the trochoidal surface increases the amount of leakage and thus decreases the power of the engine, wastes fuel, and causes the loss of emissions control. Similarly, if a coupling seal is caused to move out of engagement with the end wall surface of the chamber, any frictional forces tending to retard its return movement to sealing engagement with the end wall surface increases (1 the amount of leakage and hence the loss of power, (2) high fuel consumption, and (3) the loss of emissions control. Further, if a side seal member is caused to move out of engagement with the end .wall surface of the chamber, any vundesirable frictional forces which would retard its return movement to its sealing engagement would cause leakages from its respective chamber, allowing loss of power, loss of emissions control, and waste of fuel.

With the conventional seal arrangement described in the preceding paragraphs, adverse forces exerted on the various sealing components as the rotor rotates within the trochoidal cavity tend to increase undesirable frictional contact between the apex seal, coupling seal, side seal members and apex seal grooves to thereby retard free movement of the seals with respect to their sealing surfaces. Furthermore, the constantly changing accelerating forces acting on the apex seals due to the eccentric motion of the rotor and the trochoidal path of the apex seals tend to aggravate and cause undesirable frictional engagement and retard return motion of the seals when they are forced out of engagement with their respective sealing surfaces. It is believed that these undesirable conditions are further aggravated by the impact forces on the apex seals defining the ends of the ignition chamber upon firing due to the sudden increase of pressure which tends to force the seals radially outwardly into engagement with the trochoid surface with an amount of pressure that unduly increases the friction forces between the apex seal blades and the trochoidal surface, and that increases the likelihood of the blade coming out of contact with the trochoidal surface when the direction of the blade changes abruptly as is necessary due to the configuration of the path of movement of the apex seal blade. The intermittently high unit load pressure exerted on the apex seal blade also increases the likelihood of fatigue, damage, wear, and distortion to the trochoidal surface of the housing, reducing the life of the engine and of the apex seal, further contributing to inadequate, unreliable and unstable sealing conditions.

It is, therefore, an object of this invention to provide a construction with a sealing means between relatively movable members of a rotary engine and the like wherein the differential in the contact pressure between the surfaces of the seal members and the surfaces with which the seal members are engaged during each cycle of operation of the rotary engine or the like is minimized without losing sealing effectiveness.

A further object is to provide a construction with a sealing means that will produce a sliding seal between two members of rotary engines and the like, one of which members moves relative to the other, wherein a seal blade is received in a groove in said one member, the groove extending substantially transversely of the direction of relative movement between the two members, in which cooperating cam surfaces are provided between the groove and the seal blade, which cooperating cam surfaces are coactively responsive to forces urging the seal blade into contact with one of the side walls of the groove in such a manner as to produce advantageousreaction force components urging the seal blade to slidably cam itself outwardly from the groove to thereby maintain sealing engagement with the surface of the other member.

A further object is to provide a component sealing construction with a provision for a sealing means that will minimize the adverse effects of friction force between the drive wall of the groove and the trailing side surface of the seal blade.

A further object is to provide an apex sealing arrangement for rotary engines and the like that will minimize the shock loading on the apex seal blade caused by the intermittent and instantaneous pressure rise at ignition and explosion of the fuel without reducing the sealing efficiency of the apex seal.

Still another object of this invention is to provide an apex sealing arrangement for rotary engines and the like that will (I) increase the power output by minimizing leakage from zones of relatively high pressure to zones of relatively low pressure, (2) provide better control of the content of the exhaust emissions by reducing the amount of unburned fuel in the emissions caused by leakage during the ignition and expansion phase of each cycle of the engine, (3) provide for greater efficiency of operation by reducing the fuel consumption without sacrificing power output, and (4) reduce the wear of the sealing components and of the housing and thereby provide a longer operating life for the sealing components and housing.

Another object of this invention is to provide an apex sealing arrangement for rotary engines and the like wherein friction forces that would normally tend to retard movement of the sealing members produce compensating reaction forces tending to urge the sealing members to move in a sealing direction without retardation.

A further object is.to provide an apex sealing ar rangement for rotary engines and the like wherein the high pressures on the apex seals produced by ignition of the fuel are redistributed to reduce the impact forces on the individual seals and thereby decrease the wear on the related engine parts.

A further object of this invention is to provide an apex seal assembly for rotary engines and the like including a retaining member with which the apex seal and coupling seal can be assembled together and calibrated and the entire assembly installed as a unit on the rotor of a rotary engine or the like.

A still further object is to provide an apex seal assembly for rotary engines and the like having an apex seal blade and a coupling seal member wherein the apex seal blade and coupling seal have coacting surfaces operable to produce desirable reaction components of force in response to forces ordinarily adverse to the sealing function of the assembly, which reaction component increase the sealing function of the assembly.

A still further object is to provide a rotor for a rotary engine or the like wherein the apex portions of the rotor are defined by a retaining member that is installed separately onto the rotor so that side seal grooves can be more easily cut into the rotor prior to installation of the retaining member.

A further object is to provide a rotor for a rotary engine or the like wherein the apex portions of the rotor are defined by a retaining member that is installed separately onto the rotor and which can be made of a material different from but compatible with the material of the rotor so that the retaining member does not have to meet the requirements of the rotor material in addition to the requirements of the material of the retaining member.

A further object is to provide a retaining member for installation onto the rotor of a rotary engine or the like to form an apex portion thereof, the retaining member being formed with slots for receiving the ends of side seal strips with a clearance being provided between the surface of the slots and the ends of the side seal strips to eliminate adverse friction forces between the side seal strips and retaining member and at the same time provide a baffling effect for the escapement of fluid pressure around the ends of the side seal strips without retarding movement of the coupling seals.

Still another object is to provide a rotor for a rotary engine or the like having side seals, coupling seals and apex seals wherein the coupling seals do not frictionally engage the side seals so that the side seals and coupling seals do not interfere with the scaling functions of each other, and wherein the coupling seals and apex seals are coactively engageable with each other to urge each other toward sealing engagement with their respective sealing surfaces.

A still further object is to provide a seal blade for the apex of the rotor of a rotary engine or the like wherein the seal blade has a tip with a working surface for slidable, sealing engagement with another surface wherein the trailing portion of the working surface has a larger radius of curvature than the leading portion thereof, and which trailing portion of the blade tip is levered in the manner of a bell crank to always assure contact with the trochoidal surface of the housing and to accommodate changes in the trochoidal surface due to heat, force distortion, manufacturing tolerances, and changes in the contour of the surface engaged thereby.

A further object is to provide a seal blade for the apex of a rotary engine or the like having a cam surface formed on the trailing surface thereof for coactively engaging the trailing side wall of the groove in which it is adapted to be received in sucha manner that the seal blade is urged in a direction towardthe trailing side wall and outwardly of such groove.

Another object is to provide a seal blade for the rotor of a rotary engine or the like having a coupling seal cam surface formed thereon for coactively engaging a coupling seal member in such a manner that the seal blade and coupling seal are urged toward sealing engagement with their respective sealing surfaces by their coactive engagement.

A further object is to provide a coupling seal member for a rotary engine or the like having a cylindrical body formed with a groove for receiving an end portion of an apex seal blade, and having a seal blade contact member for coactively engaging a cam surface formed on such seal blade to produce constant reaction compo nents of force urging the coupling seal toward engagement with the surface it is adapted to sealingly engage.

A further object is to providev a sealing construction and means of sealing for rotary engines and the like that will constantly urge outward radial forces and axial forces to resist inwardforces of the sealing members when saidsealing members are cooperating. with sealing surface of the non-retaining seal members throughouteach complete revolution of the rotating member.

Another object is to provide freely slidable sealing members for rotary engines and the like to constantly resist forces and friction that would otherwise retard the sealing members free movement in an. outward direction toward the sealing surface with which they coactively cooperate.

A further object is to provide a. sealingconstruction for rotary enginesand the like that will redirect forces to contribute toward constant sealing direction. of said seals to. maintain engagement withthe sealing surfaces irrespective of the positionthat the rotating member takes throughout each revolution about an eccentric axis.

A further object is to decrease the high load pressures on the workingsealing surfaces of the seals of rotary engines and the like while providing free movement of the slidable. members without losing sealingeffectiveness or proper sealing between the seals and the cooperating members.

A further object is to provide. an assembly including a pair of oppositvely extending side sealslots in said coupling seal member, each of said coupling seal side seal slots being positioned in alignment with a respective one of said side seal slots in said retaining member to form an extension thereof, the respectiv e end portions of said side seal strips being received in'the's'lots in said coupling seal member, and wherein a clearance is always maintained between the end portions ofsaid side seal strips and the surfaces of the respective-side seal slots in said coupling seal members in all positions of said coupling seal member. Y

The foregoing, and further objects, are achieved in the present invention by the provision of an apex ing assembly including an apex seal blade retaining member, an apex seal blade and a pair of opposite hand coupling seal members biased outwardly by springs. The retaining member may consist simply of the apex portion of the rotor for the rotary engine, or may be a separate member that can be installed separately onto the rotor to define the apex portion thereof. The retaining member is formed with a groove for receiving the apex seal blade, and a pair of coupling seal recesses at each end which communicate with the apex seal blade groove. The coupling seal member is formed with a contact arm that responds to frictional forces between the coupling seal and the end wall of the cavity in which the rotor is received to urge the apex seal blade toward the trailing side wall of the slot in which it is received. The apex seal blade is formed with cam surfaces on its leading side surface for engagement by the contact arms of the coupling seals to bias the coupling seals axially outwardly toward engagement with each end wall, surface of the cavity. The ends of the apex seal blades are relieved on their lower portions so that any intermittent contact with the end wallzsurfaces ofthe engine, cavity by the ends of the seal blade will produce forces further maintaining the apex seal blade in sealing en-. gagement with its sealing surfaces. The trailing side wall of the slot in which the seal blade is received is formed-with a cam surface, and the trailing sidesurface through ports in the apex seal assembly, and operate to.

control and limit the maximum pressure caused by ignition to reduce the impact forces on the seal blade's'at ignition to reduce distortion of the trochoid surface of the housing and simultaneously reduce wear on the co operating members.

Other objects, advantages and features of the, invention will become apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a rotary engine rotor? and trochoidal chamber having a prior art, conventional apex sealing arrangement;

FIG. 2 is a diagram illustrating the distribution of the radial forces exerted by the apex seal on the trochoidal surface of the engine cavity, the FIG. 2 diagram illustrating the forces exerted by conventional apex seal assemblies, and one typifying a more desirable force pattern, as well as the theoretically ideal force pattern;

FIG. 3 is a view of a rotary engine diagrammatically illustrating the various positions and conditions affecting the apex seal during rotation of the rotor; 1

FIG. 4 is a graphical illustration ofthe velocity variations of each of the apex seals during rotation of the rotor;

FIGS. 5A and 5B are graphic illustrations illustrating the apex seal velocity change in relationship to the change of the rake angle of the apex seal with respect to the surface of the engine cavity;

FIGS; 6A-6E are fragmentary sectional views of an apex seal of ,the engine of FIG. .1 illustrating the change in the position and conditions of the sea] as the seal moves along the surface of the cavity of the engine from the lefthand firing position to the right-hand firing position;

FIGS. 7 and 8 are elevational views of a typical rotary engine rotor and trochoidal chamber of the type illustrated in FIG. 1 showing the positions of the rotor creating adverse sealing conditions at the apex seal blades;

FIG. 9 is an elevational view of a rotary engine rotor and trochoidal chamber, the rotor having apex seal assemblies according to one form of the invention;

FIG. 10 is an enlarged elevational view of an apex seal assembly of the engine of FIG. 9;

FIG. 11 is a side view, on a slightly reduced scale, of the sealing assembly of FIG. 10 taken on lines llll;

FIG. 12 is a view on lines 12l2 of FIG. 11;

FIG. 13 is a sectional view taken on lines l313 of FIG. 10;

FIG. 14 is a view similar to FIG. 10 on an enlarged scale;

FIG. 14A is a sectional view, on an enlarged scale, taken on lines 14A14A of FIG. 11;

FIG. 14B is a view illustrating the manner in which an apex seal according to the present invention tends to resist separation from the trochoid surface and cooperating sealing surfaces due to skipping and distortions in the trochoid surface as compared with one conventional apex seal construction; FIGS. 15 through 19 are views similar to FIG. 10 illustrating the change in. the position of the apex seal, coupling seal, and side seal, and illustrating sealing surfaces with the side walls of the trochoidal chamber as the seals move from the left-hand firing position to the right-hand firing position; FIG. 20 is a perspective view of the coupling seal and spring used with the assembly of FIG. 10;

FIG. 21 is a perspective view of the apex seal blade used with an assembly of FIG. 10;

FIG. 22 is a perspective view of the apex seal retainer used with an assembly of FIG. 10;

FIG. 23 is a view similar to FIG. 10 of an apex seal assembly according to another embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 24 is a sectional view taken on lines 24-24 of FIG. 23;

FIGS. 25 and 26 are sectional views taken on lines 25-25 and 26-26, respectively, of FIG. 24;

FIG. 27 is a view similar to FIG. 9, partially in section. of a rotary engine rotor-and trochoid housing according to another embodiment of the invention;

. FIGS. 28, 29 and 30 areenlarged fragmentary views of each of the apexportions of the rotor of the engine of FIG. 27;

FIG. 31 is a view similar to FIG. 27 with the rotor in a different position;

FIGS. 32, 33 and 34 are enlarged fragmentary views of each of the apex portions 'of therotorin the position of FIG. 31;

FIG. 35 is a view similar to FIG. 27 with the rotor in still different position; v

FIGS. 36, 37 and 38 are enlarged fragmentary views of each of the apex portions of the rotor in the position of FIG. 35;

FIG. 39 is a view similar to FIG. 27.with the rotor in still another position; and i FIGS. 40, 41 and 42 are enlarged fragmentary views of each of the apex portions of the rotor in the position of FIG. 39.

The numerous adverse forces and conditions acting on the apex seals of Wankel engines will first be described in connection with FIGS. 1 through 8 in connection with conventional, prior, art apex sealing assemblies.

In FIG. 1, reference numeral 20 collectively designates a rotary engine housing having a cavity 22 formed with a trochoidal surface 24 having an inwardly projecting upper lobe 28 and an'inwardly projecting lower lobe 26. The cavity 22 has a central axis designated by reference numeral 21. The cavity 22 is further defined by the inner surfaces 27a and 29a of end plates 27 and 29, respectively, closing the opposite ends of the cavity. Fragmentary portions of the end plates 27 and 29 are illustrated in FIG. 1. Intake and exhaust ports 23 and 25, respectively, are illustrated in the trochoidal wall 24 of the cavity on opposite sides of the lobe 26. In some conventional rotary engines and the like, the intake and exhaust ports are formed in the end plates rather than in the trochoid surface.

Eccentrically rotatably mounted in the cavity 22 is a rotor collectively designated by reference numeral 30, the rotor 30 being of triangular configuration with convex side walls. The axis of the engine housing and cavity 22 is indicated by reference numeral 21, while the axis of the rotor is indicated by reference numeral 31. The rotor 30 includes an end face 32 disposed in opposed relationship with the surface 27a of the end plate 27, an end face 32 disposed in opposed relationship with the surface 29a of the end plate 29, and three side walls 34, the side walls being individually designated by reference numerals 34a, 34b and 340. The apex portions of the rotor are designated by references characters X, Y and Z. The side wall 34b extends between the apex portions X and Y, the side wall 34c extends between the apex portions Y and Z, and the side wall 34a extends between the apex portions Z and X.

Mounted in the end face 32 and extending along each of the side walls between the apex portions are side seal members 36, the side seals 36 being designated individually by reference numerals 36a, 36b and 36c which are disposed adjacent to the side walls 340, b and c, respectively. The side seals 36 are provided to sealingly engage the surface 27a of the end plate 27. The ends of the side seals engage coupling seals 38x, 38y and 382 located at the apex portions X, Y and Z, respectively. Also mounted in the apex portions are are apex seal blades 40, the apex seal blades being individually designated by reference numerals 40x, y and z at the apex portions X, Y and Z, respectively. Similar side seals and coupling seals are provided on the end face 32 of the rotor'to sealingly engage the end face 29a. The apex sealv blades 40 engage the trochoidal surface 24 and sweep along the surface 24 as the rotor 30 rotates

Patent Citations
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US1831243 *Aug 20, 1928Nov 10, 1931Hart Alvin LRotary fluid operated and operating device
US3127095 *Jun 27, 1962Mar 31, 1964 Froede
US3142439 *Apr 26, 1962Jul 28, 1964Nsu Motorenwerke AgSealing means for rotary engine
US3180560 *Aug 22, 1961Apr 27, 1965Nsu Motorenwerke AgSealing system for rotary mechanisms
US3180561 *May 28, 1962Apr 27, 1965Nsu Motorenwerke AgNon-jamming apex seal
US3204615 *Nov 8, 1961Sep 7, 1965Bayerische Motoren Werke AgRotary piston machine
US3206108 *Apr 1, 1963Sep 14, 1965Kloeckner Humboldt Deutz AgRotary piston internal combustion engine
US3261334 *Dec 5, 1963Jul 19, 1966Nsu Motorenwerke AgLubricating sealing structure for rotary mechanisms
US3485217 *Oct 3, 1967Dec 23, 1969Outboard Marine CorpApex seal for rotary combustion engine
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3961871 *Jan 16, 1975Jun 8, 1976Toyo Kogyo Co., Ltd.Corner seal means for rotary piston type engines
US5592386 *Jul 7, 1995Jan 7, 1997Noranda Inc.Method and apparatus for the detection of reciprocating machine faults and failures
US6575719 *Jul 27, 2001Jun 10, 2003David B. MannerPlanetary rotary machine using apertures, volutes and continuous carbon fiber reinforced peek seals
US8597006Oct 14, 2011Dec 3, 2013Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp.Apex seal for rotary internal combustion engine
US8720898 *Oct 19, 2009May 13, 2014Ip Consortium LimitedSeal assembly and method
US20110204572 *Oct 19, 2009Aug 25, 2011Ip Consortium LimitedSeal assembly and method
US20130028777 *Oct 14, 2011Jan 31, 2013Eugene GekhtGas seal arrangement for rotary internal combustion engine
WO2003012290A1 *Jul 29, 2002Feb 13, 2003David B MannerAn improved planetary rotary machine using apertures, volutes and continuous carbon fiber reinforced peek seals
Classifications
U.S. Classification418/61.2, 418/113, 418/124, 418/142, 418/120, 418/122
International ClassificationF01C19/02, F01C19/00, F02B55/00, F02B55/02
Cooperative ClassificationF01C19/02
European ClassificationF01C19/02