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Publication numberUS3861257 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 21, 1975
Filing dateNov 8, 1973
Priority dateNov 8, 1973
Publication numberUS 3861257 A, US 3861257A, US-A-3861257, US3861257 A, US3861257A
InventorsWilliam F Laird, David I Walsh, George E Corneau
Original AssigneeHartford Fibres Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Precision cutter
US 3861257 A
Abstract
A precision cutter is provided for cutting rope into fibres of uniform length. A plurality of blades are provided having cuting edges arcuately arranged and facing inwardly. Rope is fed within the curve and pressed against the edges of the blades, forcing the rope outwardly against the cutting edges. The bodies of the cutting blades diverge outwardly in the direction taken by the cut fibres, and the cut fibres are conveyed by a fluid such as air to a collecting chamber.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[ Jan. 21, 1975 United States Patent Laird et al.

83/403 83/913 X Farmer et al. 83/913 X 2,307,721 l/l943 Weirauch..,........,.................. 3,557,648 l/l97l Coffin Primary Examiner-J. M. Meister Ontario, Canada Nov. 8, 1973 Appl. No.: 413,902

ABSTRACT [22] Filed:

A precision cutter is provided for cutting rope into fibres of uniform length. A plurality of blades are provided having cuting edges arcuately arranged and fac- 83/346, 83/349, 83/913 ing inwardly. Rope is fed within the curve and pressed against the edges of the blades, forcing the rope out- 4 0 NO 1 7 4 3 D 6 4 3 3 l 9 3 8 h c r a e wardly against the cutting edges. The bodies of the 7 3 2 2 3 O 4 9 4 3 l l 5 4 8 2 3 8 cutting blades diverge outwardly in the direction taken by the cut fibres, and the cut fibres are conveyed by a fluid such as air to a collecting chamber {56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,278,662 4/1942 83/403 30 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures PATENTED JAN 21 I975 l SHEET 1 OF '3 PATENTED 2 1915 3,861,257 sum: or 5 PRECISION CUTTER BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a precision cutter for cutting rope into a plurality of cut fibresof substantially uniform length, and more particularly, relates to an apparatus using a plurality of spaced apart cutting blades in a substantially closed configuration. In accordance with this invention, the blades are provided having cutting edges in such a configuration that when more than one layer of rope is built up within the configuration, fibres are cut at precision lengths and with minimum breakage of the blades. Fibres of staple length, or even extremely short fibres of flock length, can be produced in excellent quality and high production rates.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART Rope cutters have heretofore been provided utilizing a plurality of cutting blades which are spaced apart from each other. In one such apparatus, a cutting reel has been provided, wherein a number of replaceable cutting blades are set around the reel circumference with the cutting edges on the outside. The rope band passes through a tensioning device before reaching the cutting reel, and the reel is caused to revolve. This builds up a rope band around the cutting reel with the inner layer of the rope hand against the cutting edges of the blades. Adjacent the circumference of the cutting reel there is located a pressure roller which is spaced slightly from the cutting edges of the blades. As the rope bands built up between the blades and the pressure roller, the pressure on the rope increases until it becomes so high that the inner layer of rope is cut by the blades.

The blades, in such a configuration, coverge inwardly in the direction in which the cut rope then passes. Because of this convergence in the path that must be taken by the cut rope, it has not been possible to utilize such an apparatus for cutting extremely short lengths, such as flock, which may be as short as one-sixteenth inch for example, because of interference of the blades with each other due to their convergence along the path of the cut fibres. The apparatus of the prior art as discussed above has only been utilizable for considerably longer lengths of cut fibres, such as staple, having typical lengths of 3/16 inch, 1 1% inches, 4 inches and 6 inches, for example. Efforts to produce flock on such an apparatus have met with failure because of the tremendous pressures that are built up by the cut flock between the converging blades, with the packing of the fibres bending or working or even causing breakage of the blades.

Further, the fibres are forced inwardly, opposing the existing centrifugal force of the cutting reel, which tends to urge them outwardly. Also, in many cases, fibre deformation such as curling or crimping, is caused.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION It is accordingly an object of this invention to provide a precision flock cutter which operates continuously upon the rope and produces precision cut flock in mass production quantities with minimal shutdowns or blade breakage.

Another object is to provide such an apparatus which produces precision cut flock of exceptionally high quality, with a minimum number of fusions, of miscuts, and fibre deformation.

Other objects and advantages of this invention, including the provision for readily interchangeable blades, and for their mass replacement as a unit, will further appear hereinafter, and in the drawings. I

DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a view in side elevation of a precision flock cutter apparatus constructed in accordance with this invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged plan view of one-half of the apparatus appearing in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a further enlarged view in cross-section, taken as indicated by the lines and arrows III-III which appear in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a view in cross-section, taken as indicated by the lines and arrows IV-IV which appear in FIG.

FIG. 5 is a view in cross-section, taken as indicated by the lines and arrows V-V which appear in FIG. 2;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary plan view of a sector of the blade ring and blade appearing in FIG. 2, in order more clearly to illustrate important features of the invention;

FIG. 7 is a plan view of a flock cutter comprising a modified embodiment of apparatus according to this invention;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary plan view illustrating another modification of apparatus in accordance with this invention; and

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary sectional view illustrating still another modified form of apparatus in accordance with this invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Although in this description specific terms will be used in the interest of clarity, it is to be understood that these terms are used in reference to the specific forms of the invention selected for illustration in the drawings and are not intended to limit the scope of the invention, which is defined in the appended claims.

As used in connection with this invention the term rope is intended to include an elongated bundle of filaments arranged substantially parallel to each other, having a reasonably uniform thickness along its length. The filaments may be either continuous or discontinuous, the same as each other or a blend of different fibres, of the same or different denier, and may include natural fibres or synthetic fibres alone or synthetic fibres blended with natural fibres. Although the most frequently used form of rope is continuous filament tow, this term is also intended to include garnetted waste, piddled filament waste yarns, garnetted sliver filaments and natural fibres, carded sliver, braided or twisted rope and the like.

Turning now to FIG. 1 of the drawings, the number 10 comprehensively designates a precision cutter apparatus for cutting the rope R which is fed continuously from any convenient source, not shown, through a feed tube 11 which is arranged for rotation about a main drive shaft 12 which is driven in rotation by a variable speed motor 13 mounted upon a motor support 14. The cutter apparatus 10 is supported by vertical supports l5, l5 and includes a plurality of inwardly facing blades 16, circularly arranged with all cutting edges facing inwardly toward the feed tube 11. A pressure disc 17 is also mounted for rotation about the shaft 12, driven by the motor 13 and carrying a multiplicity of spacedapart pressure wheels 20, having a structure and function which will be referred to in further detail hereinafter. As will appear hereinafter the pressure disc 17 comprises upper and lower spaced discs 40, 40 between which the pressure wheels 20 are located. However, at this point it should be stated that the pressure wheels 20 are constructed and arranged to press the rope R outwardly against the cutting edges of the blades 16, causing the blades to cut the rope, and forcing the rope generally radially outwardly into an annular chamber 21 which surrounds the disc 17 and blades 16 and is connected to ductwork 22 leading to the feed end of a blower 20 having an outlet duct 24 leading into a collection chamber 25 for the cut flock. Openings 26 (FIG. 4) are provided inwardly of the ring of cutter blades 16 for admitting a fluid such as air into the suction chamber 21. Thus, the blower 23 draws air through the openings 26 into the annular chamber 21, causing the air to flow radially outwardly through the spaces between the blades 16, entraining the cut fibres and carrying them through the ductwork 22 and through the blower 23 and outlet duct 24 into the collection chamber 25, thus delivering the cut fibres for collection and ultimate shipment. It will be appreciated that collection chamber 25 is preferably a cyclone separator.

Turning to FIG. 2 of the drawings, further details are shown with respect to the manner in which the rope cutting portion of the apparatus is constructed and operated. As will he observed in FIG. 2, the feed tube 11 is rigidly mounted upon the disc 17 and swings around with it. The rope R passes through the tube 11 and over the curved surface of one of the pressure wheels 20. Each pressure wheel 20 has a central shaft 30 which rides in slots 31, 31 formed in the spaced discs 40, of the pressure disc 17. A spring 32, continuously maintained in compression, urges the shaft 30 radially outwardly, causing pressure contact between the pressure wheel 20 and the rope R. All of the pressure wheels 20 are similarly constructed and mounted and are maintained by their springs 32 continuously in pressure contact with the rope R.

Each slot 31, however, has an adjustable limit stop 33 at its outer extremity, limiting the permissible extent of movement of the shaft 30 in a radially outward direction, thus assuring that there will always be a spacing S between the maximum radius of the path of movement of the pressure wheels 20, and the radius of the circle defined by the locus of the cutting edges of blades 16. Although the magnitude of the spacing S is not critical, it is preferred to allow enough spacing so that at least a portion of the thickness of one layer of rope is always uncut, and lies in the space provided by the spacing S.

It will be appreciated from FIG. 2 that, as the drive shaft 12 rotates under the influence of the motor 13, rope is distributed around the periphery of the pressure disc 17, in between the cutting edges and the pressure wheels 20, building into one or a plurality of layers in the intervening space S. As the rope is thus trained around in one or in multiple layers within the periphery of the cutting blades 16, the pressure wheels 20 rotate in the direction indicated by the arrows thereon.

In the embodiment shown in FIG. 2, the spacing S is such that three layers of uncut rope have been provided, these being designated L1, L2 and L3 in the upper portion of FIG. 2. In view of the fact that the spacing S is not wide enough to accommodate more than three layers of rope between the cutting blades 16 and the pressure wheel 20 without building up excessive pressure, upon introduction of still another layer, the pressure wheel 20 forces the rope against the cutting blades with such a high pressure that the outer layer L1, which is in contact with the cutting edges of the blades 16, is cut into individual sections of precise dimension, each section being equal in length to the exact distance between the adjacent cutting edges of the blades. These cut sections, which are designated as flock F in FIG. 2, are then caused to move radially outwardly under pressure of successively cut layers L2 and L3, and are caught up in the air stream previously described and conveyed to the collection chamber 25 which may be a standard cyclone collector or bag collector, for example.

The yieldability of the pressure wheels 20 is an im-' portant feature of the invention, because very high cutting pressure is required when the cutting edges are closely packed, and much lower cutting pressure is needed when the cutting edges are farther apart from each other.

FIG. 3 shows some of the details of the pressure disc and of the pressure wheels 20, and of the manner in which they interact with the blades 16. It will be observed that the pressure wheel 20 has its shaft 30 mounted in a pair of spaced apart wheel discs 40, 40 comprising a part of the pressure disc 17, and that the wheel 20 extends into the space provided between a pair of stationary rings 41, 41 which are spaced apart from one another at a distance only slightly greater than the width of the wheel 20. The stationary rings 41, 41 are secured to the arms 42 of the supports 15 and the suction housing 38 by means of bolts 39, 39, see FIG. 4. The number 43 designates a stationary blade carrier ring which carries a multiplicity of blades 16, each of which is secured in position by a blade carrier 44, and a set screw 45.

Accordingly, it will be appreciated that the pressure created by the wheel 20 squeezes the layers L1, L2, and L3 radially outwardly against the cutting edges of the blades 16. As shown in FIG. 3, the blades 16 have just finished producing a cut fibre F which is shown in dotted lines just radially outwardly of the cutting edge C. The stationary rings 41, 41 thus provide an intervening passage 46 extending radially outwardly beyond the blades 16 leading to the annular suction chamber 21 for carrying the cut fibres to the collection chamber 25.

Turning now to FIG. 4 of the drawings, it will be observed that the blade carrier ring 43 with its blades 16 is secured to arms 42 of the supports 15 by means of screws 50 having knobs 51. It will be seen that the blades 16 pass through suitable slots in the arms 42 and in the upper stationary ring 41. Support for the bottom of the blades is provided by slots 52 in the lower stationary ring 41.

Since all of the blades 16 are mounted in the blade carrier ring 43, it is possible to remove all of the blades as a unit by unscrewing the screw 50 from the arms 42 but not beyond the blade ring 43 and then lifting the unit up by means of the knobs 51. If desired, individual blades can be removed by loosening the set screws 45. Of course, some blades may be omitted from the configuration, when it is desired to provide wider spacing between blades.

In connection with the vertical supports and their arms 42, it will be noted that in this instance three supports and arms are provided which are circumferentially spaced at 120.

FIG. 5 shows the rope being fed into the cutter through the feed tube 11. It passes outwardly around the pressure disc 17 previously described, but the disc 17 is not visible in FIG. 5 because it is obscured by the rope. The layers of rope L1, L2 and L3 are shown in a position in which the layer L1 is about to be cut as soon as the next layer is fed within layer L3.

It is important in accordance with this invention that the blades be mounted with respect to each other in such a manner that they diverge outwardly in the manner shown in FIG. 6 of the drawing. This provides a spacing D2 at the outer extremities of the blades which is greater than the spacing D1 at the cutting edges, thus providing an outwardly diverging passageway 53 between adjacent blades 16, 16 allowing the cut fibres to proceed radially outwardly without packing or exerting undue lateral pressure upon the blades. This is an important and advantageous feature of this invention, and it has been found that without this feature of divergence, it is virtually impossible for the cut fibres to exit without jamming or to cut the rope into short flock lengths without encountering repeated and frequent breakage of excessive numbers of cutting blades. The holders 44 have a generally U-shaped cross section and are tapered so they may be arranged side by side with each other to form a circle.

Although this invention has been described in connection with a rotatable disc operating in conjunction with a stationary ring of cutting blades, it is impossible instead to rotate the blades as shown in FIG. 8, and to maintain the pressure disc 17 and the axes of the rotatable pressure wheels 20 stationary. The rope is continuously brought into the cutter by the rotation of the blades.

FIG. 9 shows another modification of the apparatus in accordance with this invention wherein the pressure wheels 20, carried on their shafts 30, are caused to be driven in rotation by means of pinions 61 meshing with the teeth of an internal ring gear 62. In some forms of the apparatus, it has been found to be preferable to drive the wheels 20 in rotation, rather than to allow them to rotate under the influence of the rope alone, and in some cases a better cutting action and cutting control and a better cut product have been obtained.

It is an advantage of this invention that the rope may be cut into very small length fibres, forming flock having a length of one-eighth inch down to one sixty-fourth inch and even smaller. However, the apparatus is also capable of producing short staple up to three-fourths inch and longer staple from inch to 7 k inches in length, for example.

The number of wraps of uncut rope that are trained around within the periphery of the cutting edges at a given time varies, of course, with the pressure needed to cause cutting under the conditions that prevail. The spacing between the pressure wheels and the cutting edges may be varied or limited at will, as may the spring pressure and the sharpness of the blades. However, it is preferred to space the pressure wheels at least far enough away that they have no chance to contact or damage the cutting edges, and there should normally be at least a partial layer of uncut infeeding rope in the intervening space forming a cushion. However, there is no limit to the number of such uncut rope layers, and two, three, four or more may be used with efficiency and effectiveness.

The rope, of course, may be of any denier at all. With smaller deniers, such as 10,000 or less, it is preferable to use a larger number of layers of uncut rope in the intervening space, and with deniers of 250,000 to 500,000 or more, a lesser number of such uncut layers (such as part of one or up to two) is considered more practical.

It will be appreciated that the rope may be cut while wet, if desired, and the wet cut fibres may be conveyed away either by air or other fluid or by mechanical means.

Further, various blade spacings may be used, even using different spacings for a particular product, to achieve predetermined ratios of multiple cut lengths.

Instead of the springs 32, air or hydraulic cylinders, or equivalent mechanical linkages, may be substituted or even combined.

Although it is preferred in most cases to use a yieldable means such as spring 32 or the like, the apparatus may be built with fixed shafts 30 for the wheels 20, for example, as shown in FIG. 7. In that instance, although the pressure disc 17 remains concentric with the ring of blades 16, the shafts 30 and wheels 20 should be located at different diameters on disc 17. For example, as shown in FIG. 7, wheel 20a might be the closest to the center of rotation 12, 20b next closest, 20c next closest, and so on, with wheel 20h the closest to the edges of the blades 16. Since the thickness of the uncut rope varies around the circle in the same manner, these selectively spaced wheels 20a 20h provide substantially constant cutting pressure all around the circle, and they all perform approximately equal shares of the total cutting operation.

When reference herein is made to layers of rope within the ring of blades, it is appreciated that the layer next to the blades may be cut partially through, but nevertheless keeps its integrity as a layer for the purpose of assuring continuity of feed of the successive layers of rope as they are fed into the cutter.

In order to achieve maximum divergence angles of the blades it is preferable to make the blade ring at the minimum diameter that will nevertheless provide the desired production rate. Although great numbers of blades may be provided, up to 1,000 or 2,000 or even more in a common circle, we achieve preferred cutting operations by using about 50 to about 300 blades in a circular arrangement. This gives substantial blade divergence angles, excellent cutting and reliable performance in accordance with this invention.

Although specific pressure means such as discs 20 have been disclosed, other pressure means may be substituted, such as high-pressure water jets, for example.

Although this invention has been described with reference to specific embodiments thereof, it will be appreciated that various modifications may be made, including the substitution of equivalent elements for those shown and described. Further, the invention comprehends the use of certain features independently of other features; for example, it is possible to generate cutting pressure from a pressure disc like disc 17 alone, without providing any separate pressure wheels 20. Other modifications include the reversal of parts, and

the substitution of equivalent elements, all of which modifications may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

The following is claimed:

I. In a precision cutter for cutting rope into a plurality of cut fibres of predetermined short length, the combination which comprises: support means maintaining a plurality of at least about 50 spaced-apart substantially parallel cutting blades in a substantially closed configuration, said blades having cutting edges which face inwardly within said configuration and are spaced about one-eighth to one sixty-fourth inch apart from each other, feed means feeding said rope within said configuration and including distributing means operative within said configuration to distribute a layer of said rope around in successive contact with said successive cutting edges, pressure means comprising a plurality of spaced-apart pressure members movable relative to said rope within said configuration and operative and effective upon said rope while said rope is disposed in simultaneous contact with a plurality of said successive edges, to press said rope outwardly against said successive cutting edges while said rope is in contact with a plurality of said successive edges to cut said rope by radially-directed pressure in contact with said cutting edges.

2. The cutter defined in claim 1, including delivery means operative and effective to impose a stream of fluid upon the cut fibres flowing outwardly through the spaces between said blades.

3. The cutter defined in claim 2 wherein said distributing means is spaced-apart from said cutting edges at a distance greater than the thickness of said rope, and accordingly serves to distribute a plurality of layers or partial layers of said rope internally along the edges of the blades, one such layer being located in contact with said layer or partial layer which is in contact with said cutting edges.

4. The cutter defined in claim 3 wherein each said pressure means includes a rotatable member yieldably urged downwardly toward said cutting edges, and means are provided for continuously swinging said rotatable member around inside said configuration in contact with rope which is located outwardly of said rotating member but inwardly of said cutting edges.

5. The cutter defined in claim 4 wherein each said pressure means includes a wheel which is driven in rotation about its axis.

6. The cutter defined in claim 1 wherein each said pressure member is movable toward and away from said blades, and wherein stop means are provided to limit said movement toward said blades to provide a spacing equivalent to about the thickness of one to four layers of rope between said pressure member and said cutting edges.

7. The cutter defined in claim 6, wherein said stop means is adjustable in position.

8. The cutter defined in claim 6 wherein said number of thicknesses is 2.

9. The cutter defined in claim 6 wherein said number of thicknesses is 3.

10. The cutter defined in claim 6 wherein said number of thicknesses is 4.

11. The cutter defined in claim 1 wherein all means are interconnected in a manner to form a substantially enclosed chamber in which said cutting blades are radially arranged in a generally ring-shaped configuration.

12. The cutter defined in claim 1 wherein said cutting edges are removably and disposably mounted in spacer holders.

13. The cutter defined in claim 1 wherein said feed means includes an angularly arranged rotatable feed member provided within said configuration, having a rope guide which is arranged to swing around in a path which is spacd inwardly of said cutting blades to apply said rope in said configuration of said cutting edges.

14. The cutter defined in claim 1 wherein a discharge collecting passage is provided for the cut fibres outwardly of said blades, and wherein suction means are connected to the cutter to draw the cut fibres through the space between said blades and along through said collecting passage for collection of the cut fibres.

15. The cutter defined in claim 1 wherein said cutting blades are mounted on a common carrier, and wherein access means are provided in said cutter for removing said carrier as a unit for removing and replacing a plurality of blades as a unit.

16. The cutter defined in claim 15, wherein said carrier is a blade ring.

17. The cutter defined in claim 1, wherein said configuration is a ring and wherein said pressure means is a rotating disc.

18. The cutter defined in claim 1 wherein said support means comprises spaced-apart wall members forming substantially parallel floor and ceiling members, and wherein said blades extend substantially perpendicularly between said floor and said ceiling, wherein said blade configuration is a ring, wherein said pressure means includes a disc which is arranged substantially parallel to said floor and ceiling and arranged to rotate with its surface forming a confined space between said floor, ceiling, pressure disc and blade configuration, and wherein said feed means is located to feed said rope into said confined space.

19. The cutter defined in claim 2, wherein said carrier fluid is air.

20. In a precision cutter for cutting rope into a plurality of cut fibres of predetermined length, the combination which comprises: support means maintaining a plurality of spaced-apart cutting blades in a substantially closed configuration, said blades having cutting edges which face inwardly within said configuration, feed means feeding said rope within said configuration and including distributing means operative within said configuration to distribute a layer of said rope around in contact with said cutting edges, pressure means movable relative to said rope within said configuration and operative and effective upon said rope to press it outwardly against said cutting edges to cut said rope in contact with said cutting edges, wherein said cutting edges are removably and disposably mounted in spacer holders, and wherein said holders have a generally U- shaped cross section and are tapered so that they may be arranged side-by-side in contact with each other in a generally arcuate configuration.

21. In a precision cutter for cutting rope into a plurality of cut fibres of predetermined length, the combination which comprises: support means maintaining a plurality of spaced-apart cutting blades in a substantially closed configuration, said blades having cutting edges which face inwardly within said configuration, feed means feeding said rope within said configuration and including distributing means operative within said configuration to distribute a layer of said rope around in contact with said cutting edges, pressure means movable relative to said rope within said configuration and operative and effective upon said rope to press it outwardly against said cutting edges to cut said rope in contact with said cutting edges, wherein said pressure means includes a rotatable member yieldably urged outwardly toward said cutting edges, and means are provided for continuously swinging said rotatable member around inside said configuration in contact with rope which is located outwardly of said rotating member but inwardly of said cutting edges, and wherein a plurality of such rotatable pressure members are provided, wherein they are carried in spaced relationship upon a rotating drive member, and wherein drive means are provided for continuously rotating said drive member to force said pressure members against a layer of rope as said rope is fed into said configuration.

22. In a precision cutter for cutting rope into a plurality of cut fibres of predetermined length, the combination which comprises: support means maintaining a plurality of spaced-apart cutting blades in a substantially closed configuration, said blades having cutting edges which face inwardly within said configuration, feed means feeding said rope within said configuration and including distributing means operative within said configuration to distribute a layer of said rope around in contact with said cutting edges, pressure means movable relative to said rope within said configuration and operative and effective upon said rope to press it outwardly against said cutting edges to cut said rope in contact with said cutting edges, wherein said blades are mounted in a stationary manner and said rope feed means is driven in a path located within said configuration.

23. In a precision cutter for cutting rope into a plurality of cut fibres of predetermined length, the combination which comprises: support means maintaining a plurality of spaced-apart cutting blades in a substantially closed configuration, said blades having cutting edges which face inwardly within said configuration, feed means feeding said rope within said configuration and including distributing means operative within said configuration to distribute a layer of said rope around in contact with said cutting edges, pressure means movable relative to said rope within said configuration and operative and effective upon said rope to press it outwardly against said cutting edges to cut said rope in contact with said cutting edges, wherein said feed means is mounted in a stationary position within said configuration, and wherein said cutting blades are mounted on supporting means which rotate as a unit around said feed means.

24. In a precision cutter for cutting rope into a plurality of cut fibres of predetermined length, the combination which comprises: support means maintaining a plurality of spaced-apart cutting blades in a substantially closed configuration, said blades having cutting edges which face inwardly within said configuration, feed means feeding said rope within said configuration and including distributing means operative within said configuration to distribute a layer of said rope around in contact with said cutting edges, pressure means movable relative to said rope within said configuration and operative and effective upon said rope to press it outwardly against said cutting edges to cut said rope in contact with said cutting edges, wherein said support means comprises spaced-apart wall members forming substantially parallel floor and ceiling members, and wherein said blades extend substantially perpendicularly between said floor and said ceiling, wherein said blade configuration is a ring, wherein said pressure means includes a disc which is arranged substantially parallel to said floor and ceiling and arranged to rotate with its surface forming a confined space between said floor, ceiling, pressure disc and blade configuration, and wherein said feed means is located to feed said rope into said confined space, and wherein said pressure disc carries a pressure member yieldably movable toward and away from said blades, said pressure member protruding closer to said blades than does the body of said pressure disc, and said rope feed means being located to feed said rope through a location outwardly of said pressure disc but inwardly of the outermost portion of said pressure member.

25. In a method of cutting rope into fibres, the steps which comprise providing a plurality of cutting edges in a generally enclosed configuration, said edges facing inwardly toward the space within said configuration, continuously feeding said rope into the space within said configuration to lay said rope in successive contact with successive edges, applying pressure outwardly against said rope simultaneously at a plurality of spaced-apart locations to cut said rope under radiallydirected pressure on said cutting edges, while said rope is disposed in simultaneous contact with a plurality of said successive edges, and substantially radially outwardly conveying the resulting cut fibres.

26. The method defined in claim 25 wherein said pressure is applied at a point that is spaced apart from said cutting edges at a distance greater than the thickness of said rope, whereby plural layers of said rope are disposed concentrically within each other within said blade configuration, and wherein the incoming rope is fed as the innermost layer, and wherein the outermost layer is cut into fibres concurrently with the feeding of said innermost layer.

27. The method defined in claim 25, wherein said cutting of said outermost layer is accomplished by pressure applied through said innermost layer.

28. The method defined in claim 25, wherein the cut fibres are conveyed by causing a fluid to flow outwardly between said cutting edges, wherein said fluid is caused to transport said cut fibres to a collection container, and wherein said fibres are separated from said fluid in said container.

29. The method defined in claim 28, wherein said fluid is air.

30. The method defined in claim 25, wherein the rope is fed from within, in a manner to provide an internally coiled rope having more than one layer, of which the outermost layer is in contact with the cutting edges and the innermost layer is the most recently fed layer and wherein said pressure is applied upon at least a por tion of said innermost layer, said pressure being applied outwardly through said innermost layer and upon said outermost layer to cause said cutting edge to cut said outermost layer.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US2307721 *Apr 11, 1941Jan 5, 1943Bruno WeirauchMachine for cutting beans and other elongated vegetables
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3978751 *Oct 9, 1974Sep 7, 1976Farmer Earl TApparatus for cutting fibrous tow into staple
US4014231 *Dec 4, 1975Mar 29, 1977Akzona IncorporatedMethod and apparatus for cutting tow
US4083276 *Aug 16, 1976Apr 11, 1978Akzona IncorporatedMethod for cutting tow
US4237758 *Nov 15, 1978Dec 9, 1980Bayer AktiengesellschaftProcess and apparatus for shredding fibre tows into staple fibres
US4248114 *Feb 28, 1979Feb 3, 1981Fiber Industries, Inc.Cutter of elongated material
US4369681 *Nov 19, 1980Jan 25, 1983Lummus Industries, Inc.Inside-out cutter for elongated material such as tow
US4519281 *Mar 7, 1983May 28, 1985Eastman Kodak CompanyPackage wind cutter
US4535663 *Jun 2, 1983Aug 20, 1985Allied CorporationApparatus for removing cut staple
US5003855 *Jan 23, 1989Apr 2, 1991Ciupak Lawrence FChopper with auto feed
US6182332 *Jul 30, 1999Feb 6, 2001Owens Corning Composites SprlMethod of forming discrete length fibers
US7168364 *Dec 30, 2003Jan 30, 2007Mate Precision Tooling Inc.Method and apparatus for marking workpieces
EP0305057A2 *Jul 29, 1988Mar 1, 1989Lummus Industries, Inc.Apparatus for cutting elongate fibres
WO2001009415A1 *Jul 27, 2000Feb 8, 2001Owens Corning S A NvMethod of forming discrete length fibers
Classifications
U.S. Classification83/22, 83/913, 83/349, 83/346, 83/37, 83/100
International ClassificationD01G1/04
Cooperative ClassificationD01G1/04, Y10S83/913
European ClassificationD01G1/04