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Publication numberUS3861388 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 21, 1975
Filing dateJul 30, 1973
Priority dateJul 30, 1973
Publication numberUS 3861388 A, US 3861388A, US-A-3861388, US3861388 A, US3861388A
InventorsVaughn Robert Lee
Original AssigneeVaughn Robert Lee
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for administering supplemental medication with parenteral solutions
US 3861388 A
Abstract
An apparatus for administering supplemental medication with an administration set in the form of a tubular conduit for draining blood, dextrose solutions, etc., from a container to a patient's vein. A hypodermic syringe injection site of the tube is held by a support which in addition is adapted to hold one or more hypodermic syringes while the needle thereof is piercing the injection site at the proper angle and depth. The hypodermic syringes may be manipulated independently or simultaneously from a solid mounting for injecting selected amounts of supplemental medication into the parenteral solution stream.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[ Jan. 21, 1975 6/1969 Collins 128/214 R X Dalton L. Truluck Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Carothers and Carothers ABSTRACT An apparatus for administering supplemental medication with an administration set in the form of a tubular conduit for draining blood, dextrose solutions, etc., from a container to a patients vein. A hypodermic syringe injection site of the tube is held by a support 13 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures Primary Examinerwhich in addition is adapted to hold one or more bypodermic syringes while the needle thereof is piercing the injection site at the proper angle and depth. The hypodermic syringes may be manipulated independently or simultaneously from a solid mounting for injecting selected amounts of supplemental medication into the parenteral solution stream,

United States Patent 1 Vaughn APPARATUS FOR ADMINISTERING SUPPLEMENTAL MEDICATION WITH PARENTERAL SOLUTIONS [76] Inventor: Robert Lee Vaughn, 707

Beechwood B1vd., Ellwood City, Pa. 16117 July 30, 1973 Appl. No.: 383,904

128/214 R Int. A61m 05/00 Field of Search......... 128/214 R, 214 C, 214.2, 128/221, 218 R, 215

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 10/1953 Eisenstein........,.............. 128/214 R 7/1967 128/214 R [22] Filed:

Patented Jan. 21, 1975 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 lllh' Patented Jan. 21, 1975 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 APPARATUS FOR ADMINISTERING SUPPLEMENTAL MEDICATION WITH PARENTERAL SOLUTIONS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of Invention This invention relates to apparatus for infusing parenteral liquids into a patient and more particularly it relates to an apparatus for administering supplemental medication with parenteral solutions administered from a dispensing bottle or flexible bag through a conduit to the patient.

2. Discussion of the Prior Art Administration sets presently in use include a flexible plastic tube which is attached to a drip housing for measuring flow rates, which drip housing, in turn, has a tubular spike at one end for connection with a liquid filled bottle or bag. The tubular spike is generally pierced through a rubber membrane for entrance into the bottle or bag. The bottle or bag is generally held in an upside-down position adjacent the top of an intravenous (IV) pole. At the opposite end of the flexible plastic tube a hypodermic needle is connected for insertion into a patients vein. A clamp is generally provided between the ends of the plastic tube for regulating the flow rate through the tube, and in addition, an injection site is provided intermediate the ends of the plastic tube for injecting additional medication.

The injection site is generally a short length of rubber tube which is connected in series with the plastic tube. Supplemental medication such as vitamins, anesthetics, etc., are added to the parenteral solution or liquid by injecting them from a hypodermic syringe into the short length of rubber tube. This method is described in U.S. Pat. No. 3,566,868.

One or more hypodermic syringes may be utilized for the injection of the supplemental medication by piercing the rubber tube injection site with the respective hypodermic needles in a staggered or spaced relationship so that they will not interfere with each other. Thus, two or more different types of medication may be administered by selectively manipulating the proper syringe.

However, complications arise with this method in that the hypodermic syringes having their needles penetrating the injection site are rather clumsy to hold and they are generally laid on a table adjacent to the patient. Accordingly, this subjects the sterile injection site tube to contamination from the table and from the handling of the injection site tube by the nurse or physician while attempting to insert the hypodermic needle therein to the proper depth and at the proper angle. Furthermore, as the hypodermic syringes and the flexible plastic tube to which they are attached are permitted to lie loosely on a flat surface, they readily slide about the surface making it difficult to manipulate the hypodermic syringes to administer the proper amounts of supplemental medication.

Furthermore, it is difficult to insert the hypodermic syringe needles into the pierceable rubber tubing or injection site member at the proper or desired angle such that adjacent hypodermic syringe needles do not interfere with each other or the proper flow of the parenteral solution flowing within the tube and further such that the open or hollow end of the hypodermic syringe needle is inserted to the proper depth such that it is well exposed within the interior of the tube. If the needle end has not sufficiently penetrated the rubber tubing, then the supplemental medication will not reach the interior of the flexible tubing to be mixed with the parenteral solution. Likewise, if the needle is inserted too far into the tube such that its pointed end rests in the opposite side of the tube wall from which it was originally inserted, then the same results will occur.

The present invention has overcome these disadvantages and provides a means for not only gripping the flexible plastic tube together with its injection site on a firm support in a sanitary manner but in addition provides a means for holding the hypodermic syringes to the same support in their proper position and sequence. The apparatus also in its preferred form removes all of the guesswork as to the required depth and angle of penetration which must be made by the hypodermic syringe needle into the injection site.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention comprises an apparatus for administering supplemental medication with parenteral solutions wherein an elongated conduit having one end, adapted to be connected to a liquid to be administered and the other end adapted for connection means for administering a parenteral solution to a patient, is provided with a pierceable elastomeric tube member which communicates with the conduit for permitting additives to be medically administered therein. This administration set is provided with a support having attaching means for holding the pierceable elastomeric tube member on the support and in addition the support includes hypodermic syringe mounting means adapted to hold at least one hypodermic syringe while the needle thereof is piercing the pierceable, elastomeric tube member for administration of additives from the hypodermic syringe into the conduit.

The support preferably is provided with socket means which engage the needle end of the hypodermic syringe body at a predetermined distance from, and at an angle relative to, the longitudinal axis of the pierceable, elastomeric tube member to permit the desired penetration depth and angle of the hypodermic needle into the tube. Thus, no guesswork is left for the nurse dentist, physician, or anesthesiologist, and he merely has to insert the needle into the socket and sink the needle end of the hypodermic syringe body into the seat, at which point the needle will be resting at the proper angle relative to the longitudinal axis of the tube or pierceable member, and it will further automatically be inserted at the proper depth into the same.

The portion of the hypodermic syringe body which is received in the socket means is generally rigidly secured to the base end of the needle opposite the sharp end thereof, and this end portion of the hypodermic syringe body is detachable from the remainder of the syringe body. Thus, when additional medication must be inserted in the syringe, it may be detached from the needle such that the needle head or needle end portion of the hypodermic syringe body remains resting in its seat with the needle remaining pierced into the injection site. The hypodermic syringe body thus removed may either be replaced with an additional filled hypodermic syringe body or it may be refilled and then reattached to the needle such that the needle member need not be removed from the pierceable elastomeric tubing thereby preventing the possibility of leakage of the parenteral solution through the opening left by the needle.

In view of the fact that the support holds the flexible plastic tubing together with the injection site member and further provides mounting means for the hypodermic syringes, the human hands need never touch the injection site, thereby completely preventing contamination of the parenteral solution due to an injection at a contaminated area of the pierceable elastomeric tube.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS I Other objects and advantages appear in the following description and claims.

The accompanying drawings show, for the purpose of exemplification without limiting the invention or the claims thereto, certain practical embodiments illustrating the principles of this invention wherein:

FIG. 1 is a view in front elevation of the parenteral solution supplemental medication apparatus of the present invention with portions cut away.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a second embodiment of the parenteral solution supplemental medication administering apparatus of the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a rear view of the apparatus illustrated in FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a view in front elevation of a third embodiment of the apparatus of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to the first embodiment of FIG. 1, an apparatus for administering supplemental medication with parenteral solutions as shown. The apparatus as illustrated includes an administration set having an elongated tubular conduit 1 which has an outer surface, an inner surface and a bore therethrough. This tubular conduit has a hollow spike 2 at its upper end which is adapted for connection with the parenteral liquid container 3. The spike end 2 is connected to the parenteral liquid container 3 by piercing the same through a rubber membrane covering the bottom opening of the container 3 and which is in turn held in place by means of the rim 4.

A drip housing 5 is connected to the spike and measures liquid flow rates through the administration set. At the bottom end of the drip housing, the thermoplastic tube 1 is connected. This tube is preferably made of such material as polyvinyl chloride.

The flexible tube 1 passes through a clamp 6 which permits adjustment of the flow rates through the administration set.

The bottom of plastic tube 1 is connected to a pierceable, resealable elastomeric tube length or section 7 which is made of a material such as rubber and is connected at its lower end at an adapter 8. The adapter 8 in turn has a second flexible plastic tube 9 connected thereto with an adapter 10 at its end securing a hypodermic needle 11. With this arrangement, the administration set can drain parenteral liquid from the container 3 through the bore of the hollow assembled conduit provided by elements 1, 2, 5, 7, 8, 9, l0 and II into a patient's vein through the hypodermic needle I].

A support 12 is provided which may be attached temporarily to an IV (intravenous) pole or laid flat on a table or the like. Support 12 is provided with attaching means in the form of block member 13 which is provided with a longitudinal sinuous channel 14 in which the flexible tube 1 is inserted. This prevents flexible tube 1 from being drawn in either of its longitudinal directions away from the support 12. In other words, the sinuous channel 14 grips the flexible tube 1 without constricting it in any way to impede the flow of the liquid therethrough, yet prevents dislodgement of the plastic tube 1, if it is accidentally pulled in either of its longitudinal directions.

The elastomeric pierceable tube section 7 is held by attaching means in the form of another block member 15 which is provided with a vertical channel 16 which snugly receives the elastomeric pierceable tube section 7. The bottom of channel 16 is provided with a flared annular socket 17 which is contoured to receive the wider base 18 of the elastomeric tube section which is made such by expansion due to the insertion of adapter 8 into the bottom end of the elastomeric pierceable tube section 7. This prevents the bottom end 18 of the tube 7 from becoming dislodged from the channel 16 as the flared base 18 is held in the annular socket 17 with a slight pressure due to the fact that tube 1 is gripped by the sinuous channel 14 of block 13.

Accordingly, the elastomeric pierceable tube member 7 may be inserted in channel 16 without contamination by one grasping adapter 8 and tube 1 and first inserting elastomeric tube section 7 in channel 16 and then sliding the entire tube assembly upward as illustrated in the Figure by the arrow to thereby engage the flared end 18 of the elastomeric pierceable tube member 7 in the socket 17. After this has been completed, the tube member 1 is then pushed into sinuous channel 14 thereby preventing elastomeric tube member 7 from becoming dislodged from channel 16 in block 15.

The block member 15 is provided with a series of tapered bores 20 which are arranged in a staggered relationship on opposite sides of block member 15 and communicate with channel 16. The outer ends of bores 20 are sockets 21 which engage the bottom needle end 22 of the hypodermic syringe body 23 of hypodermic syringes 19. The needle body ends or needle bases 22 are rigidly secured to hypodermic needles 29 and are detachable from the remainder of the hypodermic syringe body 23 by a thread attachment.

Bores 20 are further provided with raised rib members 24 which are received in the recesses or grooves 43 of the needle body end or base 22 of the hypodermic syringe body 23 in order to prevent the needle end 22 from turning in socket 21. This permits the hypodermic syringe body 23 to be turned relative to the needle body end 22 while the same is seated in socket 21 such that the syringe body 23 may be threadably detached therefrom and removed, refilled, or replaced, and reattached to the exposed end of needle body end 22.

The sockets 21 of bores 20 engage the needle ends 22 at a predetermined distance from the longitudinal axis of elastomeric pierceable tube member 7 so that the proper penetration of the sharp needle end 25 is made into pierceable tube member 7 merely by passing hypodermic needle 29 into the selected tapered bore 20 and pushing it in until it seats firmly in socket 21 such that the needle end 25 sufflciently penetrates the tube member 7 so that the hollow sharp end of the hypodermic needles have penetrated the tube member such that the hollow end thereof communicates with the bore within elastomeric pierceable tube member 7. In this manner, the sharp needle ends 25 are also prevented from extending too far into the tube member 7 such that they might pierce the opposite side thereof. Thus, the unobstructed flow of the supplemental medication from the hypodermic syringe bodies 23 of the hypodermic syringes 19 is permitted through the hollow needle 23 into the conduit formed by the elastomeric pierceable tube member 7.

The angles of bores 20 in relation to the axis of tube section 7 are also predetermined for the most desirable angles to provide optimum flow of the parenteral solution flowing through the tube section 7.

The support 12 may be readily manufactured of an inexpensive disposable plastic thereby rendering the entire support disposable after oneuse. In this manner, the support 12 may be packaged in a sterile manner and then discarded after use. On the other hand, the support may be manufactured of a more durable material and then sterilized prior to each use. Sterilization may be carried out by submerging the support 12 into a disinfectant or by placing the same in an autoclave. It should also be recognized that the only portion of the support 12 that requires sterilization is the block member 15, and accordingly, the support 12 may also be manufactured in two parts such that the block member 15 is quickly detachable to and from the remainder of the support 12. Thus, the remainder of support 12 may be of a more durable material and the block membber 15 may be manufactured of an inexpensive disposable plastic. It also may be made of a more durable material but made detachable for autoclaving.

With the hypodermic syringes 19 inserted in a place such that needle body ends 22 are received snugly in sockets 21 of bores 20, the plungers 26 may be manipulated independently to inject the different supplemental medications maintained respectively into the parenteral liquid flow within the conduit formed by the bore within elastomeric pierceable tube section 7.

Referring next to the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 2, elements which are silimar to those depicted in the embodiment of FIG. 1 are designated with the same reference numerals. In the embodiment of FIG. 2, however, the function of the gripping block 13 and the mounting block 15 of FIG. 1 are combined into one structure. In the structure of FIG. 2, the support 12 comprises a block member 35 and a pivotal block member 36 which form therebetween a sinuous channel 37 in which the elastomeric, pierceable tube 7 lies.

The movable block section 36 is pivoted about axis 38 as indicated by the arrows. The axis 38 in this instance is a pin protruding upwardly from the bottom portion of base 35 which underlies the pivotal block member 36.

The reason that block member 36 is pivotal as illustrated rather than stationary as illustrated for block member 13 in FIG. 1 is that one should not handle the sterile, elastomeric, pierceable tube member or section 7, which would be required in order to insert the tube section directly into the sinuous channel 37 if the block member 36 were not pivotal on the block member 35. With the arrangement illustrated, the block member 36 is swung outwardly about pivot 38 to the right and then the elastomeric, pierceable tube section 7 is laid between movable block member 36 and stationary block member 35 without the nurse or physician touching the sterile tube section 7. The movable block section 36 is then rotated to the left about pivot 38 which thereby automatically causes the flexible tube 7 to conform to the sinuous channel 37 when movable block member 36 is in its full closed position as illustrated in the Figure. At this point, movable block section 36 is locked into position by means of pin 39, which is merely inserted in an opening which passes through movable block member 36 on into an underlying opening in the underlying portion of block member 35. Pin member 39 is provided with a flat key face 42 for handling. Any other suitable fastening device may be substituted for pin 39, such as a conventional snap fastener.

In the foregoing described manner, the pierceable tube member is placed into position for penetration by the hypodermic syringe needles 23 without contamination due to the fact that the support 12 is in a sterile condition before use. The support 12 may be manufactured of an inexpensive plastic which may be disposed after one use, or it may be manufactured of a more durable substance which may be sterilized before each use.

In this embodiment, the bores 20 are aligned with the axis of tube member or section 7 between peaks of its sinuous form so that the possibility of too deep a penetration by the sharp needle end 25 is eliminated and in addition, obstruction to flow of the parenteral solution within the conduit is minimized.

The support illustrated in FIG. 2 at 12 may be provided with IV pole clamps or suction cups on the back side similar to that illustrated in FIG. 3.

Referring to FIG. 3, the back side of support 12 shown in FIG. 2 is illustrated. The back side of the support 12 is provided with four suction cups 30 in opposed corners as indicated. The four suction cups 30 permit the support 12 to be firmly secured to a flat surface such as a table so that when the hypodermic syringes 19 are manipulated the support is held rigid or firm.

The back of the support 12 as indicated in FIG. 3 is also provided with IV pole clamps 31 so that the support 12 may be rigidly clamped to an IV pole for support. These IV pole clamps 31 are removable by either a snap or thread fit so that the suction cups 30 may be utilized instead.

The IV pole clamps 31 may be metal, but are preferably molded of a flexible plastic which will permit the clamp arms 32 to flex only enough to permit the neck 33 of the clamp to expand sufficiently to pass the IV pole which will then be held snugly in the seat of the clamp. A rubber seat 28 is preferably provided in the base of each clamp 31 in order to prevent the clamps from slipping or rotating on the IV pole.

FIG. 4 illustrates another embodiment of the present invention which, while being less desirable than the afore-described embodiments, is nevertheless meritorious for its simplicity. In this embodiment, elements similar to those described in conjunction with the embodiments illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2 are designated with the same numeral references.

In this embodiment, the support 12 merely consists of a flat base and the attaching means for holding the pierceable elastomeric tube member on the support are two spaced clips or clamps 40. The nurse or physician thus grasps the elastomeric, pierceable tube section 7 by its end and forces the respective ends into respective clamps or clips 40 thereby leaving the mid-section or injection site of the tube section 7 uncontaminated.

In this embodiment, the hypodermic syringe mounting means is provided by the spring clamps 41 which are, in turn, secured to support 12. Each hypodermic syringe needle is respectively inserted in the injection site and then the body 23 of the hypodermic syringe 19 is snapped into clamped engagement with its respective spring clamp 41.

The disadvantage of this embodiment is that the depth of penetration of the needle 29 into the tube section 7 is not predetermined, nor is the initial angle of insertion of the needle. In all other respects, however, the embodiment of FIG. 4 is operated in the same manner as the embodiments illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2.

It is contemplated that the present invention may be utilized with different types of injection sites which may be incorporated in different types of administration sets. For example, US. Pat. No. 2,868,200 illustrates an administration set with an injection site which is adapted to receive a plurality of hypodermic needles in an annular arrangement rather than a vertical staggered arrangement. In such a situation, the principles of the present invention may be readily carried out by arranging the hypodermic syringe mounting means of the support in an annular manner as compared to a vertical staggered manner which is illustrated in each of the disclosed embodiments of FIGS. 1, 2 and 4.

Prior art considered in preparing this application: US. Pat. No. 2,077,774, Class 128-214 US. Pat. No. 2,322,753, Class 128-221 and US. Pat. No. 2,854,027, Class 137-62541.

I claim:

1. An apparatus for administering supplemental medication with parenteral solutions comprising in combination:

an elongated conduit having one end adapted to be connected to a liquid to be administered and the other end adapted for connection means for administering a parenteral solution to a patient;

a pierceable, elastomeric tube member communicating with said conduit for permitting additives to be medically administered into said conduit;

a support;

attaching means holding said pierceable, elastomeric tube member on said support;

hypodermic syringe mounting means on said support adapted to rigidly hold at least one hypodermic syringe independently of said tube member while the needle thereof is piercing said pierceable, elastomeric tube member for administration of additives from said hypodermic syringe into said conduit.

2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said hypodermic syringe mounting means includes socket means receiving the needle end of the hypodermic syringe body.

3. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein said socket means engages the needle end of said hypodermic syringe body at a predetermined distance from and at an angle relative to the longitudinal axis of said pierceable, elastomeric tube member to permit the desired penctration depth and angle of said needle into the same.

4. The apparatus of claim 3 wherein said socket means consists of an annular socket in said support.

5. The appratus of claim 4 wherein said socket means snugly engages the sides of said needle end of said hypodermic body.

6. The apparatus of claim 5 wherein said needle end of said hypodermic body is rigidly secured to said needle and is detachable from the remainder of said syringe body.

7. The apparatus of claim 6 wherein said support is molded of plastic.

8. The apparatus of claim 3 wherein said attaching means comprises a sinuous channel in said support gripping said pierceable, elastomeric tube member.

9. The apparatus of claim 8 wherein said angle is selected such that said needle is substantially aligned with said tube member axis between peaks of its sinuous form.

10. The apparatus of claim 1 characterized in that said hypodermic syringe mounting means is adapted to hold a plurality of said hypodermic syringes in staggered needle penetration with said tube member.

11. The apparatus of claim 1 including IV pole clamp means attached thereto to provide means to clamp said support to an IV pole.

12. The apparatus of claim 1 characterized by suction cup means on said support to secure said support to a surface.

13. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said elongated conduit is flexible and said attaching means includes a sinuous channel snugly receiving a portion of said elongated conduit.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification604/86
International ClassificationA61M39/02, A61M39/04
Cooperative ClassificationA61M39/04
European ClassificationA61M39/04