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Publication numberUS3861538 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 21, 1975
Filing dateDec 3, 1973
Priority dateDec 3, 1973
Also published asCA1013203A1
Publication numberUS 3861538 A, US 3861538A, US-A-3861538, US3861538 A, US3861538A
InventorsFrank W Locke
Original AssigneeHoerner Waldorf Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Car loading block
US 3861538 A
Abstract
A car loading block for holding a load of containers from movement in a railroad car includes a rectangular sleeve of a length to extend from the stacked load to the railroad car wall or other wall. A filler comprising a pair of intersecting corrugated panels extends through the sleeve and beyond at least one end thereof. The portion of the filler extending beyond the sleeve extends between the similar sized containers and holds the sleeve between the load and the wall.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[11 3,861,538 Jan. 21, 1975 United States Patent [191 Locke I v 5 Pierce..............................

[ CAR LOADING BLOCK 105/369 S 105/367 X 3,534,691 10/1970 Carlomagno, 105/369 B 2,608,165 8/1952 3,421,451 l/1969 Brucks..................

[75] Inventor: Frank W. Locke, Minneapolis,

Minn.

Primary Exar ninerFrank E. Werner Attorney, Agent, or FirmRobert M. Dunning; Jerry F. Best [73] Assignee: I-Ioerner Waldorf Corp., Ramsey,

Minn.

[22] Filed: Dec. 3, 1973 [57] ABSTRACT A car loading block forholding a load of containers from'movement in a railroad car includes a rectangular sleeve of a length to extend from the stacked load to the railroad car wall or other wall. A filler compris [21] Appl. No.: 420,894

CMS 9MU 6 6 3 063 5. M ZML l U We B 5 MR w m9 9 m R B 5 0 "1 I. m. .U 4 u 1 U. 2 h C n .r "a N "e U US C 1m S a U IF 11] 2 00 5 55 r... .l.

ing a pair of intersecting corrugated panels extendsthrough the sleeve and beyond at leastone end 105/369 BA, 367 369 B; 214/l0.5 R; 229/14 thereof. The portion of the filler extending beyond the sleeve extends between the similar sized containers and holds the sleeve between the load and the wall.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 9 Claims, 13 Drawing Figures 2,475,719 Pierce..............................105/369 S PATENTEB JANZ 1 I975 SHEET 10F 2 1. CAR LOADING BLOCK This invention relates to an improvement in car loading block and deals particularly with a spacer for holding a series of containers of equal size in-suitably spaced relation to a parallel retaining wall such a railway car wall.

i BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION For many years difficulty has been experienced in the shipping of containers filled with products of one type or another in railroad cars without damage to the product. It is seldom that-containers of one product or another fit within a railroad car snuggly enough so that they need not be held from shifting during transportation. Usually, when the containers are of equal size, the containers are stacked against one end wall of the car and against one of the sidewalls. A wooden barricade is built up between the load of containers and the opposite wall of the railroad car so as to prevent movement of the containers toward this other wall. In other cases, rows of containers are built up against an end wall and both of the side walls'thereof. lnthis case, a wooden barricade is built up between the rows of containers on opposite sides of the car; The building of such a wall is not only time consuming but also expensive. Furthermore, a wooden barricade is often difficult to build, particularly where the space between the load of containers and the railroad car wall or between rows of containers is relatively short. In such a case, the barricade must be built as the containers are loaded into the car, as after the load is completed, there is insufficient space between the load and the wall of the railroad car to permit the erection of such a wall.

Various devices other than wooden barricades have been provided for filling this empty space in a railway car to prevent the shifting of the load. One such means comprises inflatable flat bags which may be inserted in the empty space and may be inflated as the load is built up or may be inserted in the empty space and inflated after the load is complete. Such inflatable bags are obviously costly, and are not disposable. Accordingly,

after use, the bags must be preserved and returned tothepoint of shipment for further'use. This creates an extra expense, and usually results in some loss. Thus it is usually preferable to erect a barricade from wood or other such material which is disposable and need not be returned.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION l have found thata very inexpensive car loading block may be formed of corrugated paperboard. Contin ued tests have found that loading blocks can effectainers, the load within the car can be readily restrained from movement toward the spaced wall.

A feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a spacer block including a filler having panels which intersect at right angles. One of these panels overlies the upper panel of two adjoining containers, while the right angular panel extends between the containers which are in side-by-side relation. Where the containers are stacked one above the other, the horizontal panels may overlie the upper surfaces of the containers in the lowermost layer, and may extend beneath the upper tier of containers. As aresult, the corners of four containers which-are adjoining can be held from movement toward the wall of the car.

A feature of the present invention resides in the fact that by forming the rectangular sleeve with the corrugations extending longitudinally of the sleeve, the sleeves are extremely'resistent to cruching. With the present arrangement, one panel of the corrugated sleeve engages against each of the four containers of the stack, effectively holding the load from shifting.

A further feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a car loading block which may be used to hold the uppermost layer of containers from movement toward the railroad car wall. In such an event, the lower portion of one filler member extends between the containers while the other panel rests upon the top of conveyers. When once engaged in place, the sleeves are prevented from tilting or shifting by engagement with the containers and the wall, so that the movement of the load is effectively prevented.

A further feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a car loading block which can be produced at a minimum of cost. The only veriable in producing the blocks is the length of the sleeve which differs as the space between the load and the railway car wall differs. The length of the fillers may remain constant for the accomodation of various lengths of sleeves. In other words, the tillers may remain constant for sleeves of two or three inch lengths or tenor twelve inch lengths as long as the fillers-exceed the length of the sleeves by a reasonable amount. The sleeves may be produced in units which-are several feet in length, and

the sleeves may be cut off to form sleeves of the desired length. Thus once the length of sleeve is determined to accomodate a certain load'and certain car, sleeves may be cut of the proper length to accomodate this load and car.

I have found that an effective car loading block may be formed employing asquare sleeveof corrugated pa.- perboard and a filler of corrugated paperboard comprising a pair of intersecting panels where only one panel exceeds the length of the sleeve. l have found that the blocks may be effectively anchored if the extending end of the filler extends between the upper surface of one container and the lower surface of a super- I. imposed container. Thisstructure has theadvantage edges of the panels engage into the corners of the sleeve. This filler is somewhat longer than the sleeve so as to project from one end thereof. The projecting end of the filler may accordingly be placed to fit between adjacent containers so as to be firmly secured in place. By inserting such structures between equal siZe conthat it need not extend between the corners of the containers, and two or more blocks may extend between each container and the wall.

An additional feature of my invention liesin the fact that one liner panel may be completely enclosed withina sleeve, while both ends of the other liner panel may extend beyond the. sleeve ends. A block of this type is useful where rows of containers are built up against both side walls of the car. The extending ends of a filler may be rested upon the upper ends of two spaced con tainers, with the sleeve engaging the walls of these containers. Two containers may be rested upon the spaced containers to hold the four containers in spaced relation.

These and other objects, and 'novel features of the present invention, may be more clearly and fully set forth in the following specification and claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic view indicating an end portion ofa railroad car with a series of containers therein, showing the car loading blocks in place. I

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a single car loading block.

FIG. 3 is a sectional view vertically through a car loading block in place between a pair of superimposed containers.

FIG. 4 is a diagrammatic view of one of the filler panels.

FIG. 5 is a diagrammatic view of the other filler panel.

FIG. 6 is another perspective view of the car loading block.

FIG. 7 isan exploded view showing the tiller in spaced relation to the sleeve.

FIG. 8 is a diagrammatic. perspective view of anend of. a railway car, showing another form of loading block.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of the loading block shown in FIG. 8.

FIG. 10 is a diagrammatic plan view of the intersecting panels forming the liner for the block shown in FIGS. 8 and 9.

FIG. 11 is a diagrammatic perspective view of another modified form of loadingblock.

FIG. 12 is a perspective view of the loading block shown in FIG. '11.

FIG. 13 is a diagrammatic plan view of the intersecting panels forming the filler in the .loading block of FIGS. 11 and 12.

The car loading blocks are perhaps best illustrated in FIGS. 2, 6, and 7 of the drawings. As is indicated in FIG. 7, each car loading block includes a square sleeve of corrugated paperboard or the like having side panels 10, 11, 12-, and 13 connected along parallel fold lines 14. A stitch or glue flap 15 is connected to one end panel of the series, for example the panel 13, and is secured to the surface of the other end panel of the series, for example the panel 10, and the glue flap 15 is stitched or otherwise secured to a surface of the panel The blocks A also include a filler which is indicated p in general by the numeral 17. The filler 17 is formed of'the panels 19 and 20 which are shown in FIGS. 4 and 5 of the drawings. The panels 19 and 20 are actually identical in form and each panel includes a slot 21 intermediatebetween its side edges 22, the slots 21 extending one half of the length of the panels 19 and 20. As a result, these panels 19 and 20 may interfit with another to form a cross-shaped filler with the panels extending in right angular relations. The panels 19 and 20 are of equal length and are somewhat greater in length than the length of the square sleeves.

As indicated in FIG. 7 of the drawings, when the sleeve is erected into rectangular form, the filler 17 may be inserted in an end thereof so that one end 23 may be flush with an end of the sleeve, and the other end of the filler may project beyond the other end of the sleeve. Each of the panels Hand 20 extend diagonally of the sleeve 9 so that the parallel longitudinal edges 22 engage the corners of the sleeve between ad- 5 joining panels and adjacent the fold lines 14 connecting the panels together.

FIG. 1 of the drawings indicates the manner in which the car loading blocks A are used. A railroad car body is indicated diagrammatically by the letter C, and the car C is indicated as having a floor 24, an end wall 25 extending upwardly at an end of the floor, and parallel side walls 25 and 26 extending upwardly along opposite sides of the floor. As is also indicated in this figure, the containers B are placed in rows 27, 29 and 30, the containers of thetrows being in face contact. One wall of the containers B of the row 27 are in face contact with the wall 25, and a right angular wall at the end of each row is in face contact with the end wall 25. The walls of the containers which are opposite those engaging the railway car wall 25 are in spaced relation to the side wall 26 of the car. A plank 31 may be nailed to the floor between the load of containers B and the wall 26 if it is desired, but such a plank has been found unnecessary in actual practice. I

As thebody of containers is built up, the lower tier of containers normally supports a similar layer or tier. As indicated in FIG. 1 of the drawings, a transverse row of containers 8 of containers is usually positioned before the similar superimposed containers B are placed on top of them. As shown in this figure, a block A is inserted between adjoining corners of three containers by merely wedging them apart sufficiently so that the panel such as 20 may rest upon the upper surfaces of two adjoining containers of the outermost row. In actual practice, this is not as difficult as it may seem, do to the fact that the walls of the containers tend to bulge. A transverse row of containers B are placed upon the containers of the transverse row therebeneath, and the various rows may be added one at a time, and the spacer blocks or car loading blocks may be added as the erection of the wall continues.

When two layers or tiers of containers are provided 7 in the railroad car, usually the lower tier of containers will present a flat surface on which the second tier of containers may be supported, and it is unnecessary to hold the upper ends of the upper tierfrom tilting. However, if it is desired, the blocks A may be also inserted between the upper ends of the containers and the wall 26. When once in place, the blocks A holding the upper tier of containers B from tilting are held in place from slipping down between adjoining tiers by the horizontal flanges of the panels 20 resting upon the upper surfaces of the containers B. Due to the fact that the sleeves 9 till the space between the containers and the car wall, they cannot very well tilt out of place, and accordingly remain in place in spite of'the fact that only the portion of'the projecting end of the panel 19 which is below the level of the panel 20 is engaged between the containers.

FIGS. 8 to 10 of the drawings show a modified form of loading block D which may take the place-of the loading block A. In this construction, a rectangular sleeve 32 is provided identical to the sleeve 9 previously shown. The sleeve 9 is of a length to fit the space between the containers B and the railway car wall 26.

The fillers 33 are of the form illustrated in FIGS. 9

and 10. One filler panel 34 is of similar length to the sleeve 33, and is wholly contained within the sleeve to add to the compressive strength of the loading block D. The other panel 35 is of a length to project beyond one end of the sleeve. The slots 36 and 37 in-the panels 34 and 35 respectively are of a length equal to one half the length of the panel 34.-

As indicated in FIG. 8, the blocks D may be applied to the upper surfaces of the containers B in the lower row of containers (such as the row 30). Due to the fact that the blocks D need not fit between the corners of the containers, they may fit anywhere along the length of the containers. The blocks D are particularly useful when the containers are of considerable length. The term length is meant to describe the dimension of the container which is parallel to the side walls 25 and 26 of the car.

The loading blocks-illustrated in FIGS. 11 to 13 of the drawings are of use where the rows of containers are stacked to provide the empty space between longitudinal rows of containers. In FIG. 11, the rows 27 and 29 are in contacting relation along the car wall 25,

while the row 30 of containers are stacked along the car wall 26. This provides a dunnage space between the containers B and the containers B.

The loading block E appears as best illustrated in FIG. 12. The square sleeve 39 is identical in shape and form to the sleeves 9 and 32 which have been described. These sleeves 39 are formed of proper length to fit between the containers B and'B of the rows 29 and 30. i

The fillers 40 are formed as illustrated as in illustrated in FIG. 13. One panel 41 is substantially equal in length to the length of the sleeve 39. The other panel 42 is of a lengthto extend beyond bothends of the sleeve 39. The slot 43 in the panel 41 is'one half the length of this panel. The slot 44 in the panel 42 extends 1 one half the length of this panel. Accordingly, when interfitted together, the panel 41 is centrally located between the ends of the panel 42, as indicated in FIG. 12'.

The loading blocks E are applied by placingeach block to span the space between the containers B and the containers B, with the sleeves 39 extending between-thecontainers B and B. The projecting ends of the panels 42 rest upon the upper surfaces ofthe lower tiers of containers as shown in FIG. 11. The blocksE take the place of barricades andprevent the spacedv containers B and B from sliding toward one another during movement of the cars.

In accordance with the Patent Statutes, I have described the principles of construction and operation of my improvement in CAR LOADING BLOCK; and while I have endeavored to set forth the best embodiment thereof, I desire to haveit understood that obvious changes may be made within the scope of the following claims without departing from the spirit of my invention.

I claim:

1. A car loading block for use in holding a load of similarly sized containers in spaced relation to a railto panels engaging diagonally opposite corners of said rectangular sleeve, at least a portion of the filler extending beyond one end of said sleeve.

2. The block of claim 1 and in which the corrugations of said sleeve extending parallel to the axis thereof.

3. A car loading block in combination with a pair of adjoining containers of equal height having coplanar walls in spaced parallel relation to a railway car wall, the car loading block including:

a square sleeve of corrugated paperboard of a length substantially equal to the distance between said coplanar walls and said railway car wall,

a filler within said sleeve,

said filler comprising a pair of rectangular paperboard panels slotted to intersect at right angles to one another, each panel extending diagonally of said sleeve with-opposite panel edges engaging diagonally opposite corners of said. sleeve,

an end of one of said panels projecting beyond said sleeve and resting upon the upper surfaces of said containers.

4. The combination of claim 3 and including a second pair'of containers resting upon said first named pair of containers with corners ofsaid second pair of containers resting upon the projecting ends of said one panel.

5. Thestructureof claim 4 and including a projecting end on the other of said filler panels extending between the adjoining corners of said pairs of containers.

6. A series of spacers for holding containers in spaced relation to a retaining wall, the containers being rectangular and of equal height, width and thickness, said containers being arranged in two rows, the containers of one row being in superimposed relation upon the containers of the other row with the adjoining walls of the containers of one row directly'above'the adjoining walls of the containers'of the other row and with one coplanar wall of the containers of both rows lying in spaced parallel relation to said retaining wall, said spacers each comprising:

a square sleeve of corrugated papergo ard of a length substantially equal to the distance between said coplanar wall and said retaining w-all,

a filler in said sleeve and extending beyond one end of the same, i

said filler comprising a pair of rectangular panels each slotted midway between their parallel sides an extendingportion on one of said panels overlying the top surfaces of said adjoining containers of said one row and beneath the lower surfaces of overlying containers of said the other row.

7. The structure'of claim 6 and including extending portions on theother of said panels extending between the adjacent vertical walls of said adjoining containers.

8. A car loading block in combination with containers arranged in two spaced apart parallel rows, the containers being of equal height, the block including:

a square sleeve of corrugated paperboard of a length substantially equal to the distance between said spaced rows,

a filler comprising a pair of panels slotted to intersect at right angles to one another, each panel extending diagonally of said sleeve with opposite panel edges engaging diagonally opposite corners of said sleeve,

3,861 ,5 38 7 8 one of said panels extending beyond said sleeve to superimposed upon said containers of said spaced rows rest upon the upper surfaces of opposed containers and resting upon said projecting ends of said one panel of said rows. of said filler. 9. The structure of claim 8 and including containers

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2475719 *May 15, 1946Jul 12, 1949Pierce Harold CBracing system for boxed produce loads
US2608165 *Jul 25, 1947Aug 26, 1952Pierce Harold CBox load brace
US3421451 *May 31, 1966Jan 14, 1969Hunt Wesson Foods IncDunnage plug
US3534691 *Jun 17, 1968Oct 20, 1970Carmen F CarlomagnoThree-dimensional carton-spacer
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3985242 *Jul 14, 1975Oct 12, 1976Burlington Northern Inc.Dunnage filler
US4109587 *Jan 27, 1977Aug 29, 1978Narad, Inc.Load spacer support
US5132156 *Mar 7, 1990Jul 21, 1992Down River International, Inc.Void filler
US5823726 *Apr 3, 1997Oct 20, 1998Damage Prevention CompanyReinforced slotted void filler
US7836668 *Nov 19, 2008Nov 23, 2010American Excelsior CompanyMethod of packing and shipping erosion control blankets
US8176712Oct 25, 2010May 15, 2012American Excelsior CompanySystem for packing and shipping erosion control blankets
US20130134278 *Nov 28, 2011May 30, 2013Shay ZeltzerCarton stacking stabilizer ("css")
WO2008077790A1 *Dec 12, 2007Jul 3, 2008Arcelik AsA supporting member for transportation
Classifications
U.S. Classification410/155, 220/919
International ClassificationB60P7/13, B65D25/10
Cooperative ClassificationB60P7/13, B65D25/10, Y10S220/919
European ClassificationB65D25/10, B60P7/13
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 4, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: STONE CONTAINER CORPORATION
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:STONE BROWN PAPERS, INC., A DE CORP., (MERGED INTO);REEL/FRAME:004893/0167
Effective date: 19861222
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNORS:STONE CONTAINER CORPORATION, A CORP. OF IL, (MERGED INTO);S.C.C. MERGER CORPORATION, A CORP. OF DE, (CHANGED TO);REEL/FRAME:004893/0153
Effective date: 19870515
Oct 28, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: STONE BROWN PAPER, INC., A CORP. OF DE.
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:CHAMPION INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION, A CORP.OF N.Y.;REEL/FRAME:004680/0410
Effective date: 19860707