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Publication numberUS3861683 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 21, 1975
Filing dateApr 18, 1973
Priority dateApr 18, 1973
Publication numberUS 3861683 A, US 3861683A, US-A-3861683, US3861683 A, US3861683A
InventorsCarl M Henry
Original AssigneeCarl M Henry
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tubular shaped projectile for sporting games
US 3861683 A
Abstract
A longitudinally oriented and cylindrically shaped tubular member used primarily to serve as the intended projectile to be struck with a club or other similar objects as one step in the play of a sporting game, said tubular member being comprised of a resilient material such as Nylon, and having a cylindrically shaped cavity throughout its entire length, and wherein said cavity may be lined with a hollow steel sleeve inserted within the cavity, which cavity member is open at each respective end and is so adapted to receive a circular end plug to seal the cavity on each end.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Henry Jan. 21, 1975 1 1 TUBULAR SHAPED PROJECTILE FOR 3,179,412 4/1965 Niederberger 273/106 R x SPORTING GAMES 3,649,017 3/1972 Kirkpatrick 273/106 R [76] Inventor: Carl M. Henry, 1956 Franklin St., FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS Lucas, Ohio 43624 375,413 6/1932 Great Britain 273/95 F [22] Filed: 1973 Primary ExaminerPau1 E. Shapiro [21] Appl. No.: 352,171

[57] ABSTRACT [52] U S Cl 273/106 R 273mm 6 A longitudinally oriented and cylindrically shaped tu- [51] A63b 65/00 bular member used primarily to serve as the intended [58] Fie'ld B 84 95 F projectile to be struck with a club or other similar ob- 273/l28 jects as one step in the play of a sporting game, said tubular member being comprised of a resilient mate- [56] References Cited rial such as Nylon, and having a cylindrically shaped cavity throughout its entire length, and wherein said UNITED STATES PATENTS cavity may be lined with a hollow steel sleeve inserted Nekuda F within the cavity cavity member is pen at 2.121.989 6/1938 Schnase et a1. 273/84 X each respective end and i so adapted to receive 3 Cir:

' 2: 5; fig cular end plug to seal the cavity on each end. 239933696 7/1961 Demaline 273/95 F 2 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures \a 14 16B 20A TUBULAR SHAPED PROJECTILE FOR SPORTING GAMES BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Projectiles of various sizes and shapes are used frequently in the prior art of sporting games. One of the most common shapes used is a round projectile such as a baseball. Certain games, however, used an elongated or cylindrically shaped projectile to be propelled towards target zones upon the impact of a club member. One such type of projectile is used in the game described in the US. Pat. No. 2,993,696 (Demaline). It is the type of projectile shown in the Demaline patent to which this invention is directed as an improvement feature. One disadvantage of the usual cylindrical projectile is the lack of durability. This problem is readily apparent because frequent striking of the projectile by clubs of hardened materials. On the one hand, the projectile must be sufficiently hard and durable to withstand repeated strikings. On the other hand, the projectile must be sufficiently resilient and lightweight in order to serve as an optimal projectile. If, for instance, the composition of the projectile is of a material of high density, it will be too heavy for ideal propulsion upon impact by the club. Consequently, one can see the need for some durable but lightweight construction for a projectile of the type described herein. It is to this problem that this invention is directed, and the objects of this invention are construed accordingly, as follows:

It is thus an object of this invention to provide an improved projectile for sporting games of the type using an elongated projectile;

It is another object of this invention to provide a durable projectile for a sporting game;

Other and further objects of this invention will become manifest upon a reading of the description in conjunction with the following drawings:

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a side elevational view in section of the bar construction, showing the preferred embodiment of the subject invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the projectile showing an alternate embodiment for the subject invention.

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view of the projectile showing another alternate embodiment of the subject invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE GENERAL EMBODIMENT The invention is a unique tubular construction for a projectile for sporting games which is comprised mainly of a cylindrically shaped and longitudinally extending tubular member, which is in turn composed of a durable resilient material such as nylon or hard rubber. The tubular member has a longitudinally extending inner cavity of equal diameter throughout its entire length and is open at each end. The central cavity has a central longitudinally extending axis which is congruent with the central longitudinal axis of the tubular member itself. As a result of this latter axial relationship with the tubular member this tubular member and the central cavity are symmetrical relative to one another. Inserted in the cavity of the tubular member is a metallic tubular sleeve which serves as a liner and strengthening member of the overall tubular projectile. This tubular sleeve has an outer diameter equal to the inner diameter of the central cavity of the tubular member, and as a consequence the sleeve fits snugly within the cavity as a support-member. On each end of the tubular member where the cavity opens to the outside there is a plug member affixed at the end of such cavity to seal the inner cavity.

Referring now to the drawinggand particularly FIG. I, in which a preferred embodiment is shown, a projectile 8 is shown. The basic member of projectile 8 is an elongated cylindrical tubular member 10, as shown. This tubular member 10 is preferably constructed of a nylon material or similar hard rubber material so as to impart both a resiliency and durability to the projectile. Tubular member 10 has ends 12A and 12B respectively, as shown in FIG. 1. Additionally tubular member 10 has a longitudinally extending inner central cavity 14, of equal diameter throughout the entire length which cavity extends completely through tubular member 10 from end 12A and 12B. The central cavity 14 is equal diameter throughout the tubular member 10 and has a central longitudinal axis which is congruent with the central longitudinal axis of the tubular member 10. Therefore, the tubular member 10 with its central cavity 14 is symmetrical throughout its length. This cavity 14 is enlarged at the respective ends thereof adjacent to ends 12A and 12B of tubular member 10. This enlarged diameter areas 16A and 168 at such respective ends serves to receive sealing means, discussed below. Inserted in the cavity 14 is a metallic sleeve member 18 of hollow construction. Sleeve 18 has a diameter equal to the inner diameter of cavity 14 so that when it is inserted in place such sleeve fits tightly into the cavity. The sleeve 18 thus serves as a skeletal supporting member to impart strength to the tubular member 10 comprising the main element of the projectile 8.

Affixed into the enlarged diameter areas 16A and 16B of cavity 14 are circular end plugs 20A and 203. These end plugs have a diameter equal to the diameter of areas 20A and 208 respectively and thus when affixed into such areas as shown in FIG. I, serve to seal the cavity area 14 from outside dust or other foreign particles.

The projectile 8 thusly constructed is a durable unit, yet light enough to be able to fly a substantial distance upon impact. In FIGS. 2 and 3 are shown alternate embodiments in which the projectile is constructed in a variant form of that shown in FIG. 1. These will be described below.

Referring to FIG. 2, a projectile is shown. Projectile 80 is comprised of a tubular member which has ends 112A and 1128, as shown. Furthermore, tubular member 100 has a central cavity 114 which is similarly disposed as the central cavity 14 in tubular member 10, as shown in FIG. 1. In all respects, therefore, tubular member 100 is similar in constructional features to the tubular member 10, as shown in FIG. I. There are enlarged diameter areas 116A and 116B at the ends of 112A and 1123 of tubular member 100 which are adapted to receive circular end plugs 120A and 1208 for sealing the cavity 114. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 2, there is no sleeve inserted within the cavity 114.

In FIG. 3, a third embodiment of the subject invention is shown. Specifically, a projectile I80 is shown being comprised of a base tubular member 200 having ends 212A and 2128. Tubular member 200 is cylindrical in shape and has a cylindrical cavity 214 disposed therethrough, except that in the embodiment shown in FIG. 3, the cavity 214 is enclosed at the end 2128, thus, the only opening of the cavity is at end 212A on tubular member 2128. An enlarged diameter area 216 is machined in cavity 214 near end 212A, as shown. Inserted within the cylindrical cavity is a tubular sleeve member 218, which is of similar construction and function to tubular sleeve member as shown in FIG. 1. A circular end plug 220 is inserted into the enlarged cavity area 216 for sealing purposes.

The inventive concept for the projectiles as described above yeilds a tubular projectile which is both durable and resilient. The resultant resiliency provides a better projectile for flight path purposes, making the game more enjoyable, while the durability provides a more economical feature. The foregoing descriptions are of specific embodiments and are for description purposes sealing means on each end are circular plugs.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1935370 *Nov 25, 1932Nov 14, 1933Nekuda Raymond FGame apparatus
US2121989 *Dec 1, 1937Jun 28, 1938Robert M HawkCombined handle grip and weapon
US2377498 *Jan 10, 1944Jun 5, 1945Jacke Raymond EGame or toy
US2640699 *Aug 28, 1947Jun 2, 1953Garbo Paul WDisklike plaything
US2993696 *Aug 15, 1958Jul 25, 1961Demaline Donald ROutdoor game
US3179412 *Jul 3, 1962Apr 20, 1965Niederberger Albert PTorque ball
US3649017 *Mar 9, 1970Mar 14, 1972James W KirkpatrickSimulated baseball game
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4022467 *Sep 13, 1974May 10, 1977Ruess Alfred PTennis practice device
US4253673 *May 4, 1979Mar 3, 1981Bailey Dennis BPiece for catch and toss game
US4305582 *Mar 3, 1980Dec 15, 1981Barton Owen EArticulatively segmented, elongate amusement device
US5067730 *Mar 12, 1991Nov 26, 1991Charles WanalistaSports game organization
US7998031 *Aug 16, 2011Sharon DumkeExercise device for aquatic use
US20040075039 *Aug 13, 2003Apr 22, 2004Dubey Dharmesh K.Molds for producing contact lenses
US20080081742 *Sep 28, 2006Apr 3, 2008Sharon DumkeExercise device for aquatic use
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/604, 273/DIG.600
International ClassificationA63B67/14
Cooperative ClassificationY10S273/06, A63B67/14
European ClassificationA63B67/14