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Publication numberUS3861730 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 21, 1975
Filing dateMay 21, 1973
Priority dateMay 21, 1973
Publication numberUS 3861730 A, US 3861730A, US-A-3861730, US3861730 A, US3861730A
InventorsJoseph J Ringo
Original AssigneeJoseph J Ringo
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Collector-compactor for hair and the like
US 3861730 A
Abstract
A debris collector especially suited for hair and adapted to receive sweepings thereof and to compact and store the same for subsequent disposal. A box-like enclosure is provided with a scoop and a compactor operable therein and relative to the said scoop, so as to compress the otherwise loose hair into a readily opened chamber held closed by virtue of floor engagement of the scoop when the device is operated and/or at rest. Structurally rigid as well as flexible materials, smooth and devoid of interstices, are used advantageously for efficient collection and sanitation.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191' Ringo 111 3,861,730 Jan. 21, 1975 [541 COLLECTOR-COMPACTOR FOR HAIR AND THE LIKE [76] Inventor: Joseph J. Ringo, 11109 E. Lynrose,

Arcadia, Calif. 91006 [22] Filed: May 21, 1973 21 Appl. No.: 362,415

[52] U.S. C1. 294/1 R, 15/257.1, 56/328 R,

' 294/19 R, 294/55 [51] Int. Cl. A471 13/08 [58] Field of Search.....' 294/55, 1 R, 19 R;

[56] 1 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 689,156 12/1901 Benham 15/257.6 2,440,934 5/1948 De Vol 56/202 2,695,488 11/1954 Harrison 294/55 2,821,833 2/1958 Axtell 294/19 R 2,984,850 5/1961 Law et a1. 56/202 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 982,818 1/1951 France l5/257.6

Primary Examiner-Richard A. Schacher Assistant Examiner Jeffrey V. Nase Attorney, Agent, or FirmWilliam H. Maxwell [57] ABSTRACT A debris collector especially suited for hair and adapted to receive sweepings thereof and to compact and store the same for subsequent disposal. A box-like enclosure is provided with a scoop and a compactor operable therein and relative to the said scoop, so as to compress the otherwise loose hair into a readily opened chamber held closed by virtue of floor engagement of the scoop when the device is operated and/or at rest. Structurally rigid as well as flexible materials, smooth and devoid of interstices, are used advantageously for efficient collection and sanitation.

8 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures LIKE BACKGROUND This invention relates, generally, to the collection of debris and particularly with the collection of hair accumulated as the result of barbering, cleanliness being a prime factor. The hair that is cut from a persons head, and other body parts, is normally allowed to fall to the floor, and for this reason the floor is usually a smooth flat surface that is readily swept clean. Since this dropping of hair onto the floor is unsightly, and because it is blown and tracked about with the least provication, it is most advisable to collect it at frequent intervals; and to do so requires the continued efforts of the hair stylist or barber involved. I-leretofore, dust pans and box-like collection devices have been employed, but without regard to the voluminous .space ordinarily required for the collection of hair. Needless to say, hair is a fine thread-like outgrowth from the skin that will occupy many times its actual volume when permitted to collect loosely at random, but which is very flexible and adapted to be compacted into a relatively small space. Heretofore, there has been a lack of appreciation for the compressible character of hair when collecting the same from the floor. Therefore, it is a general object of this invention to provide a device for the collection of hair and means combined therewith for the compaction of the hair as it is collected and all of which includes cooperative storage means for a substantial quantity of hair that is collected and compacted.

The collection of debris in the form of hair, produced as a result of barbering and/or hair styling, is a problem of sightliness. That is, dust pans and piles of hair and voluminous collections thereof in open waste baskets is not becoming and is not conductive to cleanliness and sanitation. Therefore, it is a primary object of this invention to provide a sightly device into which hair is conveniently collected, compacted and stored. With the aid of a broom or wisk, the device of the present invention is complete and self-contained for the sanitary disposal of hair cuttings that have fallen to the floor.

The compaction of debris in the form of hair is also a problem that is solved by the present invention and which should not require the use of the hands. That is, the barber or stylist should reserve the use of his hands to the manipulation of instruments and to the treatment of the person to whom his services are being applied, and to this end it is an object to provide a foot operated collector-compactor of the character thus far referred t0.

It is also an object of this invention to provide means for emptying the compacted collection of hair, all in a device which requires the fewest number of working parts made of materials especially suited for the functions involved. With this invention, the body of the device is structurally rigid, while the scoop and compactor are resiliently flexible for conformity to the body parts and/or floor contours as variatitons occur. As shown, the scoop seals with the bottom and sides of the housing and also conforms to the floor surface; and the compactor seals with the interior of the body so as to compact the debris of hair forwardly into the confining area established by the scoop.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a foot operable means to effect compaction, and all to the end that the person operating the device need not stoop, bend or touch those parts of the device at or near the floor level.

DRAWINGS The various objects and features of this invention will be fully understood from the following detailed description of the typical preferred form and application thereof, throughout which description reference is made to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the collectorcompactor of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged transverse sectional view taken through the mid-plane of the device and taken as indicated by line 2-2 on FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged longitudinal sectional view taken as indicated by line 3-3 on FIG. I.

FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 3 taken as indicated by line 4-4 on FIG. 2, showing the compactor operated to compress debris.

FIG. 5, 6 and 7 are enlarged fragmentary sectional views taken as indicated by lines'S-S, '6-6 and 77 on FIG. 3.

PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The debris collector compactor of the present invention is particularly adapted to receive and store hair out of sight and with a minimum of effort. The device functions to receive voluminous amounts of hair, to compact the same, to store the same and to discharge the same for disposal. To these ends, therefore, I have provided, generally, a body B into which hair can be swept as by means of a broom or wisk, a scoop S for collecting debris or hair into the body and compartmenting said body, a compactor C for compressing the collected debris or hair into the compartmented body, actuating means A for foot operation of the compactor, and a handle H for convenience in positioning the device without bending or stooping.

As shown throughout the drawings, the collectorcompactor is a floor supported device characterized by its box-like or bin configuration, open and ever ready for the reception of debris. It is voluminous quantities of hiar that is the problem and for which this device is particularly suited to collect, being able to compact the same within the enclosure of the body scoop combination. The floor supported bottom of the device is the body B, and in accordance with this invention the body involves closed imperforate bottom, side and back walls and a forwardly open top-front. The bottom wall 10 is supported by the floor over which it operates, and is preferably spaced slightly above the floor by opposite side legs 11. The bottom has a planar section 12 extending forwardly from a substantially vertically disposed transverse mid-plane about which the elements of the device are oriented, as will be described. The

bottom also has a semi-cylindrical section 13 extending rearwardly from the said mid-plane, described on an arc centered beneath the top horizontal plane of top wall 14 and tangentially merged with the bottom section 12. The back wall 15 is in a vertical plane truncating the semi-cylindrical bottom section 13, spaced substantially rearward of the mid-plane so that the semicylindrical section is of substantial angular extent as shown. The top wall 14 continues forwardly from the back wall to overlie the mid-plane where it terminates so as to expose the body interior, there being no front wall.

The body B is comprised of the above described walls that extend transversely, and of opposite side walls 17 joined thereto. The side walls are vertically disposed and present flat unobstructed planar inner surfaces that are parallel one with the other. The legs 11 depend as part of each side wall, and the forward upper portion of each side wall is provided with a forwardly declined upper edge 18. The edges 18 are in a common plane and are provided to guide the actuating means A later described. The body thus far described is fabricated of structurally rigid material.

The scoop S is provided to establish a ramp X for the collection of debris or hair into the above described body B and to establish a compaction chamber Y and a storage chamber Z therein. The ramp X is defined by the scoop S and the side walls 17, and is an upwardly inclined channel leading from the floor. level at the front of the device to about the mid-height thereof at the mid-plane. The compaction chamber Y is defined by the bottom, side and top walls of the body rearward of the mid-plane, and it is forwardly open throughout its vertical extent. The storage chamber Z is defined by the combined scoop S and body B, and is rearwardly open to the compaction chamber below the mid-height and at the mid-plane of the device. In accordance with this invention, the scoop S is moveable between two extreme positions, an operating position establishing the ramp X and chambers Y and Z, and a discharge position eliminating said features X, Y and Z so as to open the body B for disposal of debris or hair.

Referring now to the preferred form of scoop S, there are spaced bearings 20 on a common axis at the forward lowermost corner of the body and by which the scoop is pivoted to move between the positions shown. The scoop involves a flat panel that extends between the inner parallel surfaces of side walls 17 having sliding sealed engagement therewith. In practice, a cylindrical hub 21 depends from the panel to fricionally engage the front edge 22 of bottom section 12, said edge 22 being cylindrically concaved. There is a stop 23 limiting rearward movement of the scoop so as to determine its angular position; and the front edge 24 of the scoop is chamfered at its underside to engage flat with the supporting floor. As shown, the opposite sides 25 are parallel and slideably fitted to the side walls 17 in order to seal therewith. Various seals can be employed, and in the case illustrated, the seal is effected by forming the scoop S of resiliently pliable material having substantial body so as to retain its general configuration, an elastomeric plastic or the like such as Acrylic Butyl Styrene. Thus, the scoop S forms the inclined ramp X and establishes a reception opening occupying the upper half of said mid-plane, and forms the chambers Y and Z in open communication with each other. The hub 21 and sides 25 seal with the body which is of flexible nature permitting the front edge 24 to conform to floor irregularities. Engagement of the front edge 24 upon the floor levers the scoop S into working position, as shown.

in accordance with this invention, the compactor C is carried to move from a retracted rearmost position to an advanced compression position. There are various ways in which to carry the compactor, it being preferred to pivot it for a downward and forward swinging motion conducive to transporting debris or hair into pactor C involves a-flat panel 29 that extends between' the confines of storage chamber Z. As shown, the comthe inner parallel surfaces of the 'side walls 17 with sliding sealed engagement therewith. There are spaced bearings 30 on a common axis immediately beneath the top wall 16 and at the mid-plane of the device, and the compactor is free to swing on projecting trunnions engaged in said bearings. The lower marginal portion 31 is convexly formed and turned forwardly with its leading edge 32 sharpened as a result ofa rearward chamfer fitted to slideably seal with the bottom section 13. A transverse rib 33 projects from the forward face of the compactor and extends horizontatlly mid height thereof, where the actuator means A connects thereto. Rib 33 is disposed to engage beneath the rear margin of scoop S and acts to depress debris or hair so that it enters chamber Z when the compactor is fully actuated. Thus, debris or hair falling into chamber Y is compressed downwardly and forwardly into the chamber Z and when the compactor is in the advanced position the interior of the body B is closed. Various seals can be employed, and like the scope S seals between compactor C and body B are effected by forming the compactor of resiliently pliable material having substantial body so as to retain its general configuration, an elastomeric plastic or the like such as Acrylic Butyl Styrene. v

The actuator means A is provided to move the compactor between the extreme positions shown in FIGS.

3 and 4 of the drawings, and in accordance with this invention is foot operated. 'As shown, the means A involves an actuator 40, a linkage 41 and return means 42. The actuator 40 is a shiftable bar extending transversely over the open top and front of the body and with depending guides 43 slideably captured for movement along the opposite edges 18. Downward and forward movement of the actuator is readily effected through foot movement. The linkage 41 is preferably a pair of like links pivotally secured at thier opposite ends to the actuator 40 and compactor panel 29. The radius of pivotal securement to the panel 29 is somewhat less than the half height of the device, so that there is no interference with the scoop S. The return means 42 is preferably in the form of a tension spring or springs anchored into the top rearmost interior of body B and connected to the panel 29 below the pivotal axis thereof. Thus, the actuator means A is yieldingly operable to compress debris or hair charged into the chamber Y and returns to a rechargeable position when the actuator 40 is released.

The handle H is provided for transporting and positioning of the operative device hereinabove described. There is an upwardly extending column 50 with its terminal end formed into a hand grip 51 disposed rearwardly and at a convenient angle and height. The column legs 53 adapted to be spread apart over trunnions 54 on a common horizontal axis projecting from the mid-plane of the body B. Spaced above the trunnion axis is a raised detent 55 engageable in a complementary opening in at least one of said legs. Thus, the handle H is free to swing rearwardly or forwardly and it will stand erect upon engagement of said detent.

From the foregoing it will be seen that l have provided a practical device for the collection of voluminous quantities of hair and adapted to process the same by compressing and compacting it into a hidden storage area for subsequent disposal as circumstances require.

The person or persons operating the device need not stoop, bend or employ their hands while maintaining a cleaned-up condition about the premises where their services are performed. Thus, unsightly quantities of debris and hair are disposed of under most sanitary conditions.

Having described only a typical preferred form and application of my invention, I do not wish to be limited or restricted to the specific details herein set forth, but wish to reserve to myself any modifications or variations that may appear to those skilled in the art:

I claim:

1. A debris collector and compactor for disposing of compressible cuttings of hair and the like, and including; a body having bottom, back, top, and opposite side walls with the front thereof open forward of a transverse vertical mid-plane of the body, a scoop for directing debris into a compaction chamber located in the body rearward of said mid-plane and comprised of a panel extending between the side walls of the body and inclined from a foremost floor engaging edge to a transverse rearmost edge at said mid-plane, a normally retracted forwardly moveable compactor pivoted to the body on a transverse axis disposed horizontally beneath the top thereof and comprised of a panel with a lower edge extending between the side walls and shiftable toward the said mid-plane, the bottom interior of the body being cylindrically concaved about said axis as it extends rearward of said mid-plane to slideably engage the lower edge of the compactor and actuating means to force the compactor toward said mid-plane for compaction of debris from said compaction chamber rearward of said mid-plane and into a storage chamber defined beneath the scoop and located forward of said mid-plane.

2. The collector-compactor as set forth in claim 1 wherein the scoop extends both forwardly and rearwardly from a pivot to the body on a transverse axis disposed horizontally at the lower foremost portion thereof thereby to swing upwardly and forwardly to open the storage chamber, there being a stop limiting rearward movement of the scoop to the aforesaid incline.

3. The collector-compactor as set forth in clalim 1, wherein the opposite side walls of the body have parallel inner faces, and wherein the scoop has opposite edges slideably engaged with the inner faces at said opposite side walls and is pivoted to the body on a transverse axis disposed horizontally at the lower foremost portion thereof thereby to swing upwardly and forwardly to open the storage chamber, there being a stop limiting rearward movement of the scoop to the afore' said incline.

4. The collector-compactor as set forth in claim 1,

wherein the opposite side walls of the body have parallel inner faces, and wherein the compactor has opposite edges slideably engaged with the inner faces at said opposite side walls.

5. The collector-compactor as set forth in claim 1, wherein the opposite side walls of the body have parallel inner faces, wherein the compactor is formed of resiliently flexible material and has its opposite edges yieldably sealed with the inner faces at said opposite side walls and has its lower edge yieldably sealed with the cylindrically concaved bottom interior of the body.

6. A debris collector and compactor for disposing of comressible cuttings of hair and the like, and including; a body having bottom, back, top, and opposite side walls with the front thereof open forward of a transverse verticle mid-plane of the body, a scoop for directing the debris into a compaction chamber located in the body rearward of said mid-plane and comprised of a panel extending between the side walls of the body and inclined from a foremost floor engaging edge to a transverse rearmost edge at said, mid-plane, a normally retracted forwardly moveable compactor pivoted to the body on a transverse axis disposed horizontally beneath the top thereof and comprised of a panel with a lower edge extending between the sidewalls and shiftable toward the said midplane, the bottom interior of the body being cylindrically concaved about said axis as it extends rearward of said mid-plane to slideably engage the lower edge of the compactor, and a foot operable actuating means comprising a bar shiftably carried on the body and a linkage extending between the bar and the compactor to force the compactor toward said mid-plane in response to shifting of the bar for compaction of said debris from said compaction chamber rearward of said mid-plane and into a storage chamber defined beneath the scoop and located forward of said mid-plane. t

7. The collector-compactor as set forth in claim 6 wherein the actuating means comprises a return means yieldingly urging the compactor to its normally retracted position.

8. The collector-compactor as set forth in claim 6, wherein the opposite side walls of the body have parallel inner faces, wherein the compactor is formed of resiliently flexible material and has its opposite edges yieldably sealed with the inner faces at said opposite side walls and has its lower edge yieldably sealed with the cylindrically concaved bottom interior of the body, wherein the actuating means comprises a return means yieldingly urging the compactor to its normally retracted position, and wherein the linkage of the actuating means connects the compactor and said bar for movement of the former by the latter.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US689156 *May 13, 1901Dec 17, 1901Camilla BenhamDust-pan.
US2440934 *Nov 9, 1945May 4, 1948Vol Bart E DeAutomatic grass catcher
US2695488 *Jan 26, 1953Nov 30, 1954Jr Benjamin F HarrisonHand-operated harvesting implement
US2821833 *Feb 1, 1957Feb 4, 1958Axtell Harry RNut harvesting device
US2984850 *Jul 11, 1958May 23, 1961Law Irene LLeaf curtain attachment for lawn sweepers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5074064 *Jun 15, 1990Dec 24, 1991Nickels James GSnow shovel
US5502871 *Apr 7, 1995Apr 2, 1996Reyes; Bernard B.High capacity dust and litter collector
US5915431 *Mar 31, 1997Jun 29, 1999Doussan; Herman A.Pool cleaning apparatus
US7066847 *Jul 26, 2002Jun 27, 2006Dale PowerPuck catcher
Classifications
U.S. Classification294/177, 100/233, 294/1.4, 100/100, 100/266, 15/257.1, 56/328.1, 294/181
International ClassificationA47L13/52
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/52
European ClassificationA47L13/52