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Publication numberUS3862469 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 28, 1975
Filing dateNov 17, 1972
Priority dateNov 17, 1972
Publication numberUS 3862469 A, US 3862469A, US-A-3862469, US3862469 A, US3862469A
InventorsBurgoon Jack L
Original AssigneeScott & Fetzer Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vacuum cleaner
US 3862469 A
Abstract
An industrial or commercial type vacuum cleaner is provided. The vacuum cleaner has a nozzle extending from a blower housing to a point near the floor to be cleaned, with an air inlet opening near the floor. A flap is hinged to a forward edge of the nozzle adjacent the inlet opening and the flap can be moved between a first position in which a substantial portion of the inlet opening is covered and a second position in which the inlet opening is substantially unrestricted. A movable vane has a lower edge pivotally connected to the flap and an upper edge extending substantially into said nozzle toward the blower housing. The vane, in conjunction with the rear wall of the nozzle, restricts the effective area of the nozzle, particularly when the flap is in the first position, to increase the velocity of air flow through the nozzle and thereby improve pick up of small, heavier objects. The vane, particularly when the flap is in the second position, improves the pick-up of bulky objects by helping to push the objects up the nozzle when the flap is reciprocated and also by helping to crush such objects.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 Burgoon 1 VACUUM CLEANER Jack L. Burgoon, Toledo, Ohio [73] Assignee: The Scott & Fetzer Company,

Lakewood. Ohio [22] Filed: Nov. 17, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 307,421

[75] inventor:

2,619,669 12/1952 Cuddeback 15/418 X 2,716,773 9/1955 Meyerhoefer.... l5/418 X 3,089,178 5/1963 Sherman 15/354 X 3,491,399 1/1970 Dolan et a1. 15/418 Primary Examiner-Harvey C. Hornsby Assistant Examiner-C. K. Moore Attorney, Agent, or Firm-A1len D. Gutchess, Jr.

[111 3,862,469 Jan. 28, 1975 [57] ABSTRACT An industrial or commercial type vacuum cleaner is provided. The vacuum cleaner has a nozzle extending from a blower housing to a point near the floor to be cleaned, with an air inlet opening near the floor. A flap is hinged to a forward edge of the nozzle adjacent the inlet opening and the flap can be moved between a first position in which a substantial portion of the inlet opening is covered and a second position in which the inlet opening is substantially unrestricted. A movable vane has a lower edge pivotally connected to the flap and an upper edge extending substantially into said nozzle toward the blower housing. The vane, in conjunction with the rear wall of the nozzle, restricts the effective area of the nozzle, particularly when the flap is in the first position, to increase the velocity of air flow through the nozzle and thereby improve pick up of small, heavier objects. The vane, particularly when the flap is in the second position, improves the pick-up of bulky objects by helping to push the objects up the nozzle when the flap is reciprocated and also by helping to crush such objects.

13 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures amzams 3.862.469

PATENTED sum 1 or 2 VACUUM CLEANER This invention relates to a vacuum cleaner and more particularly to an industrial or commercial type vacuum cleaner having a nozzle with a movable vane therein to improve the operation of the vacuum cleaner.

Various large vacuum cleaners for industrial and commercial applications are known in the art and are being used more and more commonly. These vacuum cleaners usually are of the walking type with the cleaner mounted on wheels and pushed and manipulated by an operator walking therebehind. Such cleaners are used for a variety of applications as cleaning factory aisles, sidewalks, shopping center areas, and the like. Cleaners of this general type are also used by home owners for removing leaves from lawns. Since-a wide variety of debris can be encountered by such vac uum cleaners, it is important that they are capable of handling both small and large objects as well as light and heavy ones. I-Ieretofore, such cleaners have been less efficient than desired for picking up small, heavy objects, such as nuts and bolts, which may be readily sucked into the inlet opening of the nozzle but then are not pulled farther upwardly through the nozzle, past the blower, and into the collection bag through which the air passes and in which the debris is collected. Vacuum cleaners of this type also sometimes have difficulty in picking up larger objects which may tend to stick in the nozzle. 7

The vacuum cleaner according to the invention is particularly more effective in picking up debris or objects of a small, heavier nature by providing a more effective flow of air through the nozzle. The vacuum cleaner also is more effective in picking up bulky objects which otherwise may tend to stick in the nozzle by mechanically pushing the objects up the nozzle and by partially crushing them.

The improved operation of the vacuum cleaner is achieved by employing a movable vane in the nozzle which tends to increase the velocity of air flowing therethrough. This improves the efficiency of the vacuum cleaner in picking up smaller, heavier objects which otherwise tend to move into the inlet opening but then are not carried further up the nozzle because of reduced velocity of the air. The vane also enables the vacuum cleaner to be more efficient in picking up bulky'objects because it tends to crush objects which may otherwise stick in the nozzle and because it pushes the larger objects up the nozzle, as will be more apparent later.

In a preferred form, the movable vane for the vacuum cleaner nozzle is pivotally connected to a flap. The flap, in turn, is pivotally connected to the nozzle adjacent the inlet opening and can be moved between a first position in which a substantial portion of the inlet opening is covered and a second position in which the inlet opening is substantially unrestricted. The flap can be remotely controlled through a lever and linkage arrangement by an operator at the rearwardly-extending handle of the vacuum cleaner.

It is, therefore, a principal object of the invention to provide a vacuum cleaner which is more efficient in picking up debris.

Another object of the invention is to provide a vacuum cleaner having a nozzle with a movable vane therein to increase the velocity of the air through the nozzle.

A further object of the invention is to provide a vacuum cleaner with a remotely controlled flap for an inlet of the nozzle and with a movable vane pivotally connected to the flap and extending into the nozzle.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description of a preferred embodiment thereof, reference being made to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is an overall view in perspective of a vacuum cleaner embodying the invention;

FIG. 2 is an exploded view in perspective of a nozzle, flap, and movable vane of the vacuum cleaner of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a view in transverse cross section of the nozzle, taken along the line 33 of FIG. 2, and further showing a movable vane therein;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary, side view in elevation, with parts broken away and with parts in section, of the vacuum cleaner nozzle with the flap in a first position; and

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 4 but with the flap in a second position.

Referring to the drawings, and particularly to FIG. 1, a vacuum cleaner according to the invention is indicated at 10, and includes a nozzle 12 with a blower or impeller housing 14 at its upper end. An internal combustion engine 16 is mounted on the housing 14 and drives an impeller (not shown) located within the housing. The vacuum cleaner is supported on large rubbertired wheels 18 through a frame generally'indicated at 20. A pair of casters (not shown) are also mounted under the nozzle 12 to support the same a predetermined distance above the ground, the casters can be located below a rear collection bag platform 22.

A control handle 24 for the vacuum cleaner 10 includes a pair of legs 26 and 28, which are connected to the housing 14, and a cross bar 30. A large collection or filtering bag schematically indicated by dotted lines 32 is attached to a rear outlet of the blower housing 14 for receiving air-borne particles or debris from the blower which are pulled upwardly through the nozzle 12.

Referring particularly to FIG. 3, the nozzle 12 has a main inlet opening indicated at 34 at the lower end thereof, which opening is defined by a front wall 36, a rear wall 38, and side walls 40 and 42 of the nozzle 12. The front and rear walls 36 and 38 of the nozzle 12 are parallel or substantially so, with the side walls 40 and 42 being perpendicular to the planes of these walls. Thus, the transverse cross-sectional shape of the nozzle 12 is rectangular, as shown in FIG. 3, throughout the length of the nozzle. The front and rear walls are each of trapezoidal shape, however, with the side walls 40 and 42 converging toward one another in a direction from the inlet opening 34 toward the blower housing 14. At the upper or blower end of the nozzle 12, the nozzle walls terminate at a lower wall 44 of the blower housing 14 with the nozzle communicating with a large blower inlet 46 in the bottom wall 44.

With the decreasing cross section of the nozzle 12, some increase in air velocity occurs in the nozzle in a direction toward the blower housing 14. However, this increased velocity often is not sufficient to carry small, heavy objects picked up at the inlet opening 34 completely through the nozzle 12, through the housing 14, and into the bag 32. Consequently, such objects sometimes will move into the nozzle 12, when the inlet opening is narrow and air velocity correspondingly high, and

stay at an intermediate portion thereof until the blower is shut off, at which time they drop back through the inlet opening 34 and onto the floor again.

Flanges 48 and 50 which extend downwardly and outwardly from the front wall 36 are primarily for ap pearance and the channels formed between the walls 48 and 50 and the corresponding nozzle side walls 40 and 42 are closed off at the front of the nozzle, adjacent the inlet opening 34, by short partitions 52 and 54 (FIG. 2).

A flap or door 56 is located adjacent the nozzle inlet opening 34. The flap is pivotally connected to the nozzle 12 for movement between a first position (FIG. 4) in which a substantial portion of the inlet opening 34 is covered, and specifically about the upper half of the opening, and a second position (FIG. in which the inlet opening 34 is substantially unrestricted. The pivotal connection between the flap 56 and the front wall 36 can be achieved through a piano-type hinge 58 having an upper leaf 60 attached to the front nozzle wall 36 by suitable fasteners 62, and a lower leaf 64 attached to the edge of the flap 56 through fasteners 66.

The flap 56 is preferably remotely controlled for movement between the two positions. For this purpose, an L-shaped bracket 68 is affixed, as by a weld, to the flap 56 and a link rod 70 has a lower end pivotally connected to the bracket 68. The upper end of the rod 70 is pivotally connected to an L-shaped lever 72 which is pivotally supported on an upper portion of the handle leg 26. The lever 72 is manipulated by an operator to move the flap 56 to the first position, of FIG. 4, by moving the lever forwardly, and to move the flap to the second position, of FIG. 5, by moving the lever 72 rearwardly. In the latter instance, the lever 72 is in an overcenter position and holds the flap in the second position without need for the operator to continue to hold the lever.

A plate-like member or movable vane 74 is pivotally connected to a portion of the flap 56 which is spaced from the hinge 58. The vane 74 includes a wide, lower portion 76 to which a narrower upper portion 78 is affixed at an angle, the upper portion terminating in a bead 80. In this instance, an angle of 140, and preferably an angle between 120 and 160, is formed between the two portions. The forward edge of the vane 74 is connected to the flap 56 specifically by a piano-type hinge 82. The hinge 82 has an upper leaf 84 attached to the lower edge portion of the flap 56 by fasteners 88. The hinge 82 further has a lower leaf 86 which is attached to the lower or forward edge of the vane 74 and specifically the wide portion 76 thereof by fasteners 90. The hinges 58 and 82 are parallel and are positioned transversely to the direction of movement of the vacuum cleaner.

The wide portion 76 of the vane 74 is of a sufficient width to extend across the inlet opening 34 and to extend between lower end portions of the flanges 48 and 50 to substantially close off the width of the nozzle 12 when the flap 56 is in its closed position. However, a narrow gap indicated at 92 in FIG. 4 exists between the vane 74 and the lower edge of the rear wall 38 so that a narrow inlet opening still remains even when the flap 56 is in the first position and the vane 74 is in the lower position, indicated in solid lines in FIG. 4. At this time, the upper edge or head 80 of the narrow portion 78 rests on the rear wall 38 when no air is flowing through the nozzle. The narrow portion 78 is substantially of the same shape as the rear wall 38 although somewhat smaller. As such, the portion 78 substantially covers the rear wall 38 when the vane is in the solid line position of FIG. 4. When the blower is operating, and air is being drawn through the inlet opening and specifically the narrow gap 92, the vane 74 will move upwardly toward the dotted line position indicated at 96 in FIG. 4, depending upon the magnitude of the air flow into the nozzle 12.

As the collection bag 32 becomes clogged or plugged with dust and dirt, the output of the blower will decrease and the magnitude of air flow through the nozzle 12 will decrease. As this progresses, the vane 74 will drop or pivot downwardly in the nozzle 12 so as to reduce the effective cross-sectional area of the nozzle 12 and thereby maintain the same velocity of the air through the nozzle as when the bag 32 was new or cleaned. Hence, the effectiveness of the vacuum pickup is maintained even though the bag becomes clogged and volume decreases. Further, the vane at all times, when the flap 56 is in the first position of FIG. 4, decreases the effective cross-sectional area of the nozzle 12, as viewed in FIG. 3, so that the velocity of the air through the nozzle is always greater when the flap 56 is in the first position than it would be if no vane were employed. This increased velocity enables small, heavy objects to be drawn completely through the nozzle, through the impeller housing 14 and into the bag 32, whereas with the conventional nozzle, the small, heavy object might be picked up at the narrow inlet opening and then either dropped again or carried to an intermediate point in the nozzle 12 until the blower is shut off, at which time the object would drop back onto the floor.

When the lever 72 is moved to its rear position, the flap 56 moves substantially to a horizontal position, as shown in FIG. 5, at which time the inlet opening 34 is substantially unrestricted. With the flap in this position, and with no air being drawn through the nozzle 12, the vane 74 is located as shown in solid lines with the bead edge resting on the rear wall 38 of the nozzle 12. As air is drawn through the nozzle, the vane 74 can move upwardly toward a position indicated by dotted lines 98 in which instance the nozzle can accommodate objects substantially as large as if the vane were not used at all. In this position, as in FIG. 4, the velocity of the air through the nozzle can be kept more uniform even when the air flow rate drops off due to the condition of the collection bag 32.

With the flap in the open or second position so as to accommodate large objects, the vane can actually help push large objects up the nozzle and also to help crush some objects, such as paper cups, if they are too large. The objects can be pushed upwardly in the nozzle by the operator moving the lever 72 to move the flap 56 toward the first position, at which time the vane 74 and specifically the upper portion 78 thereof is moved upwardly in the nozzle. Objects then located between the vane portion 78 and the rear wall 38 of the nozzle will be pushed upwardly along the back wall due to the movement of the vane portion 78. When the operator moves the lever 72 back again to move the flap 56 toward the second position of FIG. 5, the air being drawn through the nozzle will prevent the object pushed upwardly by the vane portion 78 from being dragged downwardly to its original position. Consequently, the operator, by oscillating the lever 72, can push the larger objects up the nozzle 78 by a combination of the reciprocatory motion of the vane 74 and the movement of the air through the nozzle.

From the above, it will be seen that the movable vane 74 embodied in the vacuum cleaner provides a number of advantages. The vane tends to maintain a higher velocity of air through the nozzle than would otherwise exist. This enables the vacuum cleaner to pick up small, heavier objects and to move them completely through the vacuum cleaner to the bag 32. With the vane in the position of FIG. 5, it can be reciprocated to move larger objects up the nozzle and the weight of the vane also helps to crush larger objects which might otherwise be stuck in a fixed position. Finally, in either position of the vane, a more uniform velocity can be achieved because the cross-sectional area of the nozzle will be decreased as the magnitude of the air flow decreases, thereby maintaining a more uniform velocity instead of one which would correspondingly decrease with the decreased air flow rate.

Various modifications of the-above described em bodiments of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art and it is to be understood that such modifications can be made without departing from the scope of the invention, if they are within the spirit and the tenor of the accompanying claims.

I claim:

1. A vacuum cleaner comprising a nozzle having an inlet opening at one end, means for establishing flow of fluid through said inlet opening and into the nozzle, a flap movably mounted adjacent said inlet opening, means for moving said flap between one position in which a substantial portion of the inlet opening is closed off and another position in which the inlet opening is substantially unrestricted, and a vane having an end movably connected to said flap and another end spaced from said flap and positioned in said nozzle beyond said inlet opening, said another end of said vane being urged under the influence of gravity toward a position to block said nozzle and to reduce the transverse cross-sectional area of said nozzle thereby tending to increase the velocity of fluid flowing therethrough.

2. A vacuum cleaner according to claim 1 characterized by said nozzle having front and rear walls of predetermined shape and said vane having a portion which is shaped similarly to that of the rear wall.

3. A vacuum cleaner according to claim 1 characterized by said vane being pivotally connected to a portion of said flap which is spaced from an edge of the inlet opening.

4. A vacuum cleaner according to claim 1 characterized by said flap being connected to a forward edge of said nozzle adjacent said inlet opening for pivotal movement relative thereto.

5. A vacuum cleaner according to claim 4 characterized by said vane being pivotally connected to a portion of said flap which is spaced from the forward edge of said nozzle.

6. A vacuum cleaner according to claim 5 characterized by the pivot connections being parallel to one another and transverse to the intended direction of movement of the vacuum cleaner.

7. A vacuum cleaner according to claim 1 characterized by said vane having a lower, wide portion extending across the width of the inlet opening and an upper narrower portion having said another end in said nozzle.

8. A vacuum cleaner according to claim 7 characterized by said upper portion forming an included angle with the lower portion between and 9. An industrial or commercial type vacuum cleaner comprising a nozzle having an inlet opening at a lower end, a blower housing above said nozzle and having an inlet communicating with an upper end of said nozzle spaced from said inlet opening, said vacuum cleaner also having a rearwardly extending handle and supporting wheels, a flap movably supported by said nozzle adjacent said inlet opening at one side thereof, a movable vane having a width sufficient to extend substantially across said inlet opening, a first edge of said vane being pivotally connected to said flap near said inlet opening, a second edge of said vane spaced from the first edge extending a substantial distance into said nozzle toward said blower inlet and positioned adjacent the inner surface of said nozzle on the side thereof opposite said flap when no air is being drawn through said nozzle, said vane being moved away from said surface as the volume of air through said nozzle increases.

10. A vacuum cleaner according to claim 9 characterized by means for remotely controlling the position of said flap relative to said inlet opening for changing the effective size of said inlet opening.

11. A vacuum cleaner according to claim 9 characterized by said vane having a wide lower portion and a narrower upper portion, said second edge of said vane being on said upper portion.

12. A vacuum cleaner according to claim 11 characterized by said upper portion lying at an angle to said lower portion.

13. A vacuum cleaner according to claim 12 characterized by said angle being 120 160.

Patent Citations
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US1883327 *Feb 6, 1931Oct 18, 1932Hoover CoSuction cleaner
US2511238 *Mar 6, 1945Jun 13, 1950Electrolux CorpRug nozzle
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3984894 *Apr 15, 1975Oct 12, 1976Albert BrockSweeping vehicles for sweeping roads and other surfaces
US4499628 *Jun 9, 1983Feb 19, 1985Whirlpool CorporationVacuum cleaning apparatus
US4625453 *Jun 24, 1985Dec 2, 1986Ulys SmithApparatus for capturing insects
US4827559 *Jul 10, 1985May 9, 1989Federal-Mogul CorporationVacuum system for pavement grooving machine
US4870714 *Nov 9, 1987Oct 3, 1989Black & Decker Inc.Portable blower/vacuum system
US5208941 *Jun 23, 1992May 11, 1993Mark EttereHigh power vacuum attachment apparatus
US5604950 *Oct 27, 1995Feb 25, 1997H-Tech, Inc.Anti-clogging, variable throat suction nozzle and suction cleaning device equipped therewith
US5722110 *Oct 10, 1995Mar 3, 1998Paul Curtis McIntyrePortable industrial vacuum machine
US5794306 *Jun 3, 1996Aug 18, 1998Mid Products, Inc.Yard care machine vacuum head
US5799365 *Sep 5, 1996Sep 1, 1998Mtd Products Inc.For vacuuming debris from an outdoor surface
US6099661 *Jun 1, 1999Aug 8, 2000Fantom Technologies Inc.Comprising a restricting member mounted in the casings for reducing the size of the dirty air intakes in order to increase the velocity of the air entering
US6185917Mar 12, 1999Feb 13, 2001James GoudesVersatile utility cart
US6584640 *Mar 20, 2001Jul 1, 2003Roger P. VanderlindenLarge area surface cleaning tool for suctioning both dust and debris
US20130145578 *Jun 13, 2012Jun 13, 2013Roger P. VanderlindenPick-up head system
WO1997015737A1 *Oct 24, 1996May 1, 1997H Tech IncAnti-clogging, variable throat suction nozzle and suctioncleaning device equipped therewith
WO2012171103A1 *Jun 13, 2012Dec 20, 2012Roger VanderlindenPick-up head system
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/357, 15/361, 15/418
International ClassificationA47L7/00, A47L9/02
Cooperative ClassificationA47L9/02
European ClassificationA47L9/02
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 28, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:CLARKE INDUSTRIES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:005271/0420
Effective date: 19890412
Jan 12, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: COOPER INDUSTRIES, INC., 1001 FANNIN, SUITE 4000,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:COOPER INDUSTRIES, INC., A OH. CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004657/0666
Effective date: 19870108
Owner name: COOPER INDUSTRIES, INC., A CORP. OF DE.,TEXAS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:COOPER INDUSTRIES, INC., A OH. CORP.;US-ASSIGNMENT DATABASE UPDATED:20100528;REEL/FRAME:4657/666
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:COOPER INDUSTRIES, INC., A OH. CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004657/0666
Nov 8, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: COOPER INDUSTRIES, INC., 1001 FANNIN, HOUSTON, TEX
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:MCGRAW-EDISON COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:004475/0965
Effective date: 19851104
Jul 16, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: MCGRAW-EDISON COMPANY ONE CONTINENTAL TOWERS 1701
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:SCOTT & FETZER COMPANY THE AN OH CORP;REEL/FRAME:004287/0004
Effective date: 19840430