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Publication numberUS3862513 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 28, 1975
Filing dateFeb 15, 1974
Priority dateFeb 15, 1974
Also published asDE2506345A1
Publication numberUS 3862513 A, US 3862513A, US-A-3862513, US3862513 A, US3862513A
InventorsIsaacson Anson, Meyer Burton C
Original AssigneeMarvin Glass & Associates
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Articulated figure toy
US 3862513 A
Abstract
An action figure toy in the form of an articulated doll including a torso rotatable in the waist area about a vertical axis and spring biased toward a forward orientation and a spring biased arm rotatably mounted with respect to the torso, to enable the arm and torso to be manually moved in one direction and then released to effect a quick full body movement in the opposite direction simulating an act characteristic of the represented figure. The figure toy also includes a second non-biased movable arm, a pair of rotatably mounted legs and a pivotally mounted head. The arms include presettable joints at the elbows, and rotatably mounted hands on the ends of the arms. The legs include presettable joints at the knees, and ground supportable feet on the ends of the legs. Various sports oriented accessories, such as softball or baseball, bowling, tennis, golf and horseshoe type games, are provided for cooperative movement with the doll.
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United States Patent Isaacson et al.

[ 1 Jan. 28, 1975 ARTICULATED FIGURE TOY [75] inventors: Anson lsaacson, Chicago; Burton C.

Meyer, Downers Grove, both of ill.

[73] Assignee: Marvin Glass & Associates,

Chicago, Ill.

[22] Filed: Feb. 15, 1974 [211 Appl. No.: 442,900

[52] US. Cl 46/119, 46/120, 46/148, 273/85 E, 273/89 [51] Int. Cl A63h 13/12 [58] Field of Search 46/116, 119, 120, 148, 46/162, 164; 273/38, 87.2, 87.4, 85 A, 85 E, 89, 129

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,658,054 2/1928 Levy 273/88 2,289,421 9/1954 Grieshaber et al. 273/129 2,689,431 4/1959 Beebe 46/119 2,884,739 5/1959 Ketcham 46/116 3,050,307 8/1962 Glass et al. 273/87 4 3,179,413 4/1965 Leclerc 273/87 4 3,377,740 4/1968 Bonanno et al.. 46/119 3,758,982 9/1973 Lemelson 46/148 Primary ExaminerLouis G. Mancene Assistant Examiner-Robert F. Cutting Attorney, Agent, or FirmCoffee and Sweeney [57] ABSTRACT An action figure toy in the form of an articulated doll including a torso rotatable in the waist area about a vertical axis and spring biased toward a forward orientation and a spring biased arm rotatably mounted with respect to the torso, to enable the arm and torso to be manually moved in one direction and then released to effect a quick full body movement in the opposite direction simulating an act characteristic of the represented figure. The figure toy also includes a second non-biased movable arm, a pair of rotatably mounted legs and a pivotally mounted head. The arms include presettable joints at the elbows, and rotatably mounted hands on the ends of the arms. The legs include presettable joints at the knees, and ground supportable feet on the ends of the legs. Various sports oriented accessories, such as softball or baseball, bowling, tennis, golf and horseshoe type games, are provided for cooperative movement with the doll.

17 Claims, 11 Drawing Figures ARTICULATED FIGURE TOY BACKGROUND AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to a figure toy or articulated doll and in particular to a novel combination of joint means for a doll for effecting life-like articulations, for instance in sports-type games.

Figure toys and dolls have been produced in the past which provide mechanized or spring biased movement of arms which enable the doll to perform a human function such as throwing a ball or a punch. However, all of the previously known dolls and figure toys have failed to accurately perform human functions because of their limited degrees of freedom. There is a need for a fully articulated doll for simulating a wide range of recreational activities.

It is the object of this invention to provide a novel combination of joints in a figure toy so that the figure toy can realistically perform many human functions such as those associated with batting of a softball or baseball, hitting a tennis ball or golf ball, pitching horseshoes and bowling.

In accordance with one embodiment of the present invention, the figure toy includes a torso which has an upper portion pivotally mounted on a hip portion by a waist joint, and torso biasing means associated with the waist joint so that the upper torso is normally biased toward a forward disposition relative to the hip portion. At least one arm is rotatably mounted on the torso by an arm joint, and an arm biasing means is associated with the arm joint so that the arm is norm ally biased toward a forward direction.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1A is a perspective view of the articulated doll of the present invention being used in combination with a baseball or softball batting game;

FIG. 1B is a perspective view of the articulated doll being used in combination with a bowling game;

FIG. 1C is a perspective view of the articulated doll being used in combination with a tennis game;

FIG. 1D is a perspective view of the articulated doll being used in combination with a golf game;

FIG. IE is a perspective view of the articulated doll being used in combination with a horseshoe game;

FIG. 2 is a front elevation view of the articulated doll, on an enlarged scale, with the front portion of the torso, right wrist joint and right ankle broken away to facilitate an illustration of the interior components thereof;

FIG. 3 is a horizontal section taken generally along the line 33 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a partial vertical section taken generally along the line 4--4 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is an exploded perspective view showing the head mounting means;

FIG. 6 is an exploded perspective view, on an enlarged scale, showing the arm joint and biasing means; and

FIG. 7 is a perspective view, on an enlarged scale, of the hand attachment means.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Turning first to FIG. 2, the figure toy, generally designated 10, is in the form of an articulated doll and includes a torso having a generally hollow upper torso portion 12 and a lower torso or hip portion 14, a head 16, a pair of legs 18 and a pair of arms 20 and 21. The arms are rotatably connected to the torso portion 12 by means of arm joints, generally designated 24. The arm joint 24 for the right arm 20 also includes a biasing means, generally designated 28. The torso portion 12 is rotatably mounted to the hip portion 14 by 21 waist joint, generally designated 30. The waist joint 30 includes torso biasing means, generally designated 32. The head 16 is secured to the hip portion by head mounting means, generally designated 34.

More particularly, referring to FIGS. 2 and 6, the arm joints 24 each include a rounded ball portion (de scribed hereinafter) at the upper end of the arm received in a socket forming aperture. A shaft 38 is mounted within a bearing aperture 40 in an ear 42 formed on the inside of the back of the torso portion 12. The shaft includes a radial flange 44 and a coaxial flattened tab 46. The tab 46 is provided with a notched opening 48 and fits within a slot 50 provided in a spherical 0r ball-shaped upper end 52 of the arms 20 and 21. Pins 54 are inserted through openings 56 in the spherical portions 52 of the arms and are snap fit onto the shaft tabs 46. Each tab 42 provides support for the inner end of the shaft 38, and the engagement of the spherical portion 52 of the arm with an opening or socket 60 in the shoulder area of the torso supports the outer end of the shaft 38 thus providing for universal rotation of the arms 20 and 21 provided by the longitudinal axes of the shafts 38 and 54. A detent 62 on the flange 44 is provided in combination with a plurality of teeth 64 on the ball portion 52 of the arms 20 and 21, for defining positions for the arms 20 and 21 angularly away from the torso about the pins 54.

Each arm 20 and 21 is provided with a movable presettable joint 66 at the elbows. The joint 66 can be of any movable conventional joint of various forms (e.g., friction, wire, etc.) which permits positioning of the forearm relative to the upper arm. Although these elements are not shown in the drawings, many different forms are contemplated such as friction fit ball and socket joints, with or without stop limit means. In addition, a pin may be secured to the upper or lower arm portion and a complementary journal provided in the other arm portion such that the journal frictionally engages the pin and provides for the relative movement of the arm portions. A leaf spring may be secured to one of the upper arm portions engageable with the other to provide additional friction between the arm portions to permit positive relative positioning. A hand 68 is pivotally mounted on the end of each arm 20 and 21 by pivotal mounting means, generally designated 70 (FIG. 7), which includes a pin 72 in the hand portion which is engageable with a V-shaped resilient element 73. The V-shaped element 73 is compressible and inserted in an opening 74 (FIG. 2) in each arm and is maintained therein by the frictional forces created by the outward spring force of the V-shaped element 73. Each hand 68 contains five fingers 76 which are molded integrally with the hand 68 of a resiliently flexible material. The hands are formed in a slightly cupped position so that an implement can be held by the hand 68 due to the frictional forces thus created.

The arm support 24 for the right arm 20 also includes the biasing means 28, as seen in FIGS. 2 and 6. More particularly, the biasing means includes a U-shaped member 80 mounted in two holes 82 in the shaft 38 axially thereof. A double-ended spring 84 is coiled around the shaft 38 and engages two tabs 86 on the back of the torso 12. Thus, as seen in FIG. 4, as the arm is rotated in either direction, the U-shaped element 80 contacts one end of the spring 84 and increases the tension on the spring during continued rotation of the arm 20. When the arm is released, the spring 84 causes the arm to rapidly return towards its normal position along side the body. There is approximately 180, arrow A (FIG. 4), of possible lost motion rotation of the arm 20 without engagement of the spring 84 by the member 80. Therefore, during rotation of the arm 20 in front of the torso 12 there will be no biasing of the spring 84 on the arm 20 until the member engages the opposite end of the spring 84.

The legs 18 are pivotally mounted on the hip portion 14 by movable joints 90 and also include movable presettable joints 92 at the knees. The movable joints 90 and Q2 are friction, wire, or other type joints, similar to that described in relation to the elbow joints, which permit positionable, articulated movement of the legs 18 at the knees and hips. A foot 94 is provided on the bottom of each leg 18 and includes an opening 96 for engagement with a support stud to be described in connection with the accessories hereinafter.

The waist joint 30 comprises an inwardly directed generally circular flange 100 on the lower end of the upper torso portion 12 received in a complementary outwardly facing groove 102 on the top end of the hip portion 14. The described waist joint 30 permits relative rotation of the torso with respect to the hip portion 14 about an upright axis. The waist joint also includes the torso biasing means 32 as seen in FIGS. 2, 3 and 5. More particularly, the torso biasing means includes a coil spring 106 which is wrapped about a vertical shaft 108 extending upwardly from the hip portion 14. Two tabs 110 and 112 constantly keep the spring 106 under a slight amount of tension. Two tabs 114 and 116 are mounted on the inside wall of the torso l2 and will engage the spring 106 when the torso 12 is manually rotated relative to the hip portion 14. With continued rotation of the torso portion 12, the spring will be increasingly tensed and then when the torso is released, the spring 106 will quickly rotate the torso 12 back to its original position.

The shaft 108 also mounts the head 16 on top of the torso portion but connected to the hip portion 14. More particularly, the top of the shaft 108 includes a truncated cone section 118 which seats a ball 120. The ball 120 similarly is received in an upper truncated cone portion 122 also forming a socket or seat for the ball. The head 16 includes an inwardly directed circular flange 124 which is slidably received in a complementary groove 126 on the upper cone portion 122 so that the head may rotate relative to the hip portion 14. However, rotation of the upper torso portion 12 is independent of movement of the head. An opening 128 is provided through the center of the upper cone portion 122 and another opening 130 is provided through the ball 120. A rubberband 132 passes through the openings 130 and 128 and is wrapped about a pin 134 in the upper cone portion 122 and a pin 136 in the lower cone portion 118 to securely, but flexibly mount the head 16 to the shaft 108.

Thus, the doll has a combination of arm joints 24 and waist joints 30 both of which are spring biased to return toward their forward non-biased positions. Because two biased joints exist and because the two joints rotate about axes which are normal to one another, a motion can be achieved in the arm 20 of the doll which closely simulates the movement of the human prototype. For example, the arm 20 can be rotated backwards against the force of the biasing spring 84 and at the same time the torso can be rotated in a clockwise direction as shown by arrow B (FIG. 3) against the biasing force of spring 106. When the arm and torso are released. the arm 20 will rotate about the waist joint 30 and the arm joint 24 in two different planes. In addition, the elbow joint 66 and waist joint 70 provide varying paths of travel of the hand, Therefore, the described figure toy 10 can be used to provide articulation with a combination of new accessories (FIGS. IA through 1E) which could not be used by the previously known dolls.

Turning to FIG. 1A, the figure toy I0 is shown used in combination with a baseball game accessory, generally designated 150. The baseball game accessory includes a base structure or platform 152 and an upright stand or ball support 154. A simulated baseball 156 is pivotally secured to the platform 152 by a shaft 158 which is secured at the lower end to the platform by a ball and socketjoint 160. A plurality of ridges 162 near the forward edge of the platform 152 are provided as indicating means, and can be marked with indicia such as home run, strike out, base hit, etc. The articulatable limbs of the figure toy 10 can be positioned to hold a simulated bat 164 as shown and can swing the bat in order to hit the baseball 156. To hold the bat 164, the right spring biased arm 20 is positioned to form approximately a right angle at the elbow joint 66 and the left free arm is bent slightly less in order to grasp the bat. The hands 68 frictionally grasp the bat 164 which is manually inserted into the hands. To swing the bat, the user may use two hands to bias the torso portion 12 against the biasing spring 106 and the right, biased arm 20 against the force of the biasing spring 84, and then release both simultaneously. As the ball 156 is hit, it will rotate about the ball and socket joint and the shaft 158 will fall between two of the indicator ridges 162, and designate a score. Although not visible in this view, two studs are secured to the top of the platform and are positionable within the openings 96 on the bottom of the feet 94 to hold the figure toy upright and in proper position to hit the ball. In use with the baseball game 150 the legs 18 of the figure toy usually are not bent at the knee joints 92. It should also be pointed out, that since the head 16 of the figure toy 10 is secured to the hip portion 14, the torso can rotate about the hips while the head is in a forward facing direction similar to that of a baseball player watching the ball being pitched toward him.

FIG. 1B shows the figure toy 10 used in combination with a bowling game accessory, generally designated 170. The bowling game includes an alley I72 upon which a simulated bowling ball can roll toward a plurality of bowling pins (not shown). The alley 172 includes a stud 175 on the alley and a second stud 176 mounted on a footrest 178 which supports the figure toy 10. The alley 172 also includes a ball return gutter 179 on one side. To roll the ball 174 down the alley I72, toward the pins, the legs of the figure toy 10 should be bent at the knee joints 92 and the hip joints 90 to provide a stooping position for the figure toy 10 so that the right arm 20 can pass close to the surface of the alley 172.

Here, the torso is not biased and the right arm 20 is generally straight at the elbow joint 66. Several fingers of the hand 68 will fit into holes in the bowling ball 174 and the arm 20 is then biased against the force of the spring 84 and released. This quick release causes the bowling ball 174 to be released from the hand 68 and travel down the alley 172.

FIG. [C shows the figure toy used in combination with a tennis game accessory, generally designated 180. The tennis game is similar to the baseball game (FIG. 1A) in that indicating ridges 182 comprise a plurality of markers indicating a particular score. A simulated tennis ball 184 is mounted on a rod 186 which is universally supported by a ball and socket joint 188 in a cone-shaped upright support 190. The tennis ball 184 is set for hitting by engagement of the rod 86 in one of a plurality of vertically spaced notches 192 provided in an upwardly directed support shaft 194. The fingers of the right hand 86 of the figure toy l0 frictionally grasp the tennis racket 196 as shown in order to hit the tennis ball which causes the shaft 186 to register in between the indicating ridges 182 to determine a score for that hit. To hit the tennis ball 184, the figure toy 10 can be manipulated with both hands similar to that for the baseball game accessory 150. For tennis though, the right arm is almost straight and the tennis racket 196 is held with only the right hand 86. Twisting of the torso 12 provides most of the return movement required to strike the tennis ball 184 although the arm 20 can also be cocked to provide various angles of contact with the tennis ball 184. Again the head 16 of the figure toy 10 is stationary and does not rotate with the torso.

FIG. 1D shows the figure toy 10 used in combination with a golf game accessory, generally designated 200. The golf game includes a simulated golf ball 202 which is positioned on a simulated tee 204 secured to a platform 206. At the other end of the platform 206 is a cup 208 and a pin 210 receivable in the cup 208. To strike the golf ball 202 the arms of the figure toy 10 are generally bent at the elbows with the right arm being bent considerably more than the left arm 21. The golf club 212 is grasped on the handle by the resilient hands 68. The legs 18 also are slightly bent at the knees as shown in FIG. 1D. For this accessory the torso is slightly twisted to bias the torso spring 106 but less than that necessary for the baseball or tennis game accessories. The right arm, however, must be biased against the spring 84 to provide the force necessary to cause the golf club 212 to strike the golf ball 202. And again the head 16 of the figure toy 10 remains stationary as the torso rotates.

FIG. 1B shows the figure toy 10 being used in combination with a horseshoe game accessory. The knee joints 92 of the figure toy 10 are bent slightly as shown in FIG. 1E with one foot positioned in front of the other. To throw a simulated horseshoe 214, the torso does not necessarily have to be biased. The arm 20 is biased against the spring 84 and then released to cause the horseshoe 214 to be pitched toward a stake (not shown) for scoring as in the game of horseshoes.

The foregoing detailed description has been given for clearness of understanding only and no unnecessary limitations should be understood therefrom as some modifications will be obvious to those skilled in the art.

We claim:

1. A figure toy in the form of an articulated doll, comprising:

an upper torso portion and a lower torso portion connected together at a waist joint for relative rotation of one with respect to the other about a generally vertical axis when the doll is in a generally erect disposition;

torso biasing means operatively associated between said upper and lower torso portions normally biasing the upper torso portion toa generally forwardly directed orientation relative to the lower torso portion to permit the upper torso portion to be pivoted about said vertical axis relative to the lower torso portion against the force of said biasing means, whereby the biasing means, upon release of said upper torso portion, will move said upper torso portion rapidly back toward its forwardly directed orientation;

an arm member movably mounted on said upper torso portion generally at a shoulder joint; and

a second, arm biasing means operatively associated between said arm member to a forward position to permit the arm member to be moved relative to the upper torso portion against the force of said arm biasing means whereby the arm biasing means, upon release of said arm member, will move said arm member rapidly back toward its forward position, and whereby the arm member and the upper torso portion can be moved simultaneously against the force of the arm biasing means and torso biasing means, respectively, so that upon simultaneous release thereof the arm will move forwardly in an arc defined by the two biasing means.

2. The figure toy of claim 1 wherein said arm member is pivotally mounted to said upper torso portion at a shoulder joint for rotation relative to said upper torso portion about an axis extending generally perpendicular to said vertical axis.

3. The figure toy of claim 2 wherein said arm pivot axis extends generally transversely of said figure toy between the shoulder areas thereof.

4. The figure toy of claim 3 wherein said arm member is pivoted at said shoulder joint for rotation about a second, front to rear axis extending generally perpendicular to said transverse axis.

5. The figure toy of claim 4 including detent means at said shoulder joint operatively associated with said arm member defining a plurality of discreet angular positions of the arm member about said second, front to rear axis.

6. The figure toy of claim 1 including a pair of articulatable leg members journalled generally at the base of said lower torso portion.

7. The figure toy of claim 1 including a second arm member mounted on said upper torso portion for generally universal movement relative thereto, both arm members having hand portions on the ends thereof for grasping a manipulatable implement by moving the hand portions together for operative association.

8. The figure toy of claim 1 including a head member mounted above said upper torso portion and connected to said lower torso portion independently of said upper torso portion whereby said head can maintain a predetermined orientation notwithstanding relative movement of said upper torso portion.

9. A figure toy in the form of an articulated doll, comprising:

an upper torso portion and a lower torso portion connected together at a waist joint for relative rotation of one with respect to the other about a generally vertical axis when the doll is in a generally erect disposition;

torso biasing means operatively associated between said upper and lower torso portions normally biasing the upper torso portion to a generally forwardly directed orientation relative to the lower torso portion to permit the upper torso portion to be pivoted about said vertical axis relative to the lower torso portion against the force of said biasing means, whereby the biasing means, upon release of said upper torso portion, will move said upper torso portion rapidly back toward its forwardly directed orientation;

an arm member movably mounted on said upper torso portion generally at a shoulder joint for rotation relative to said upper torso portion about an axis extending generally perpendicular to said vertical axis;

arm biasing means operatively associated between said arm member and said upper torso portion normally biasing the arm member to a forward position to permit the arm member to be moved relative to the upper torso portion against the force of said arm biasing means, whereby the arm biasing means, upon release of said arm member, will move said arm member rapidly back toward its forward position;

a pair or articulatable leg members journalled generally at the base of said lower torso portion; and

a second arm member mounted on said upper torso portion for generally universal movement relative thereto, both arm members having hand portions on the ends thereof for grasping a manipulatable implement by moving the hand portions together for operative association.

10. The figure toy of claim 9 wherein said arm member is pivoted at said shoulder joint for rotation about a second, front to rear axis extending generally perpendicular to said transverse axis.

11. The figure toy of claim 10 including detent means at said shoulder joint operatively associated with said arm member defining a plurality of discreet angular positions of the arm member about said second, front to rear axis.

12. The figure toy of claim 9 including a head member mounted above said upper torso portion and connected to said lower torso portion independently of said upper torso portion whereby said head can maintain a predetermined orientation notwithstanding relative movement of said upper torso portion.

13. The figure toy of claim 9 including, in combination, a base support on which said figure toy is positionable in a generally erect position, means engageable with the lower ends of said legs for holding the figure toy in a predetermined position on said base structure. a simulated baseball, an upright stand mounted on said base structure on top of which said baseball is positionable, and said implement comprising a simulated baseball bat graspable by the hand portions of said figure toy for striking said simulated baseball in response to hand manipulation of said figure toy against at least one of said biasing means and releasing the figure toy.

14. The figure toy of claim 9 including, in combination, a base support on which said figure toy is positionable in a generally erect position, means engageable with the lower ends of said legs for holding the figure toy in a predetermined position on said base structure. a simulated golf ball, means defining a tee on top of said base structure on which said golf ball is positionable, and said implement comprising a simulated golf club graspable by the hand portions of said figure toy for striking said golf ball in response to hand manipulation of said figure toy against at least one of said biasing means and releasing the figure toy.

15. The figure toy of claim 9 including, in combination, a base support on which said figure toy is positionable in a generally erect position, means engageable with the lower ends of said legs for holding the figure toy in a predetermined position on said base structure, a simulated tennis ball, means protruding upwardly from said base structure for positioning said tennis ball thereabove, said implement comprising a simulated tennis racket graspable by the hand portion of at least said biased arm member for striking said tennis ball upon manipulation of the figure toy against'at least one of said biasing means and releasing the figure toy.

16. The figure toy of claim 9 including, in combination, a base support on which said figure toy is positionable in a generally erect position, means engageable with the lower ends of said legs for holding the figure toy in a predetermined position on said base structure. means defining a simulated bowling alley on top of said base structure, said implement comprising a simulated bowling ball graspable by the hand portion of said biased arm member for projection of the bowling ball down said alley upon manipulation of said figure toy against the force of at least said arm biasing means and releasing the figure toy.

17. The figure toy of claim 9 wherein said implement comprises a simulated horseshoe.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3 862 513 Dated Januarv 28. 1975 Inventor(s)Anson Isaacson and Burton C. Meyer It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Claim 1, line 19, delete "a second,

Claim 1, line 20, after "arm member" insert --and said upper torso portion normally biasing the arm member-.

Signed and sealed this 29th day of April 1975.

(SEAL) Attest: 4

C. MARSHALL DANN RUTH C MASON Commissioner of Patents Attesting Officer and Trademarks

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Classifications
U.S. Classification446/381, 273/317.9, 446/380, 446/390, 473/107, 446/268, 273/108.22
International ClassificationA63H3/00, A63H3/20, A63H3/36, A63H3/48, A63F7/06, A63H13/12, A63F7/00, A63H13/00, A63H3/46, A63F7/24
Cooperative ClassificationA63H3/48, A63H13/12, A63H3/20
European ClassificationA63H3/20, A63H13/12, A63H3/48