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Publication numberUS3862872 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 28, 1975
Filing dateAug 17, 1972
Priority dateAug 18, 1970
Publication numberUS 3862872 A, US 3862872A, US-A-3862872, US3862872 A, US3862872A
InventorsHoey Charles Edwin
Original AssigneeRohm & Haas
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for making non-woven pile fabric
US 3862872 A
Abstract
Continuous strands of yarn are formed into loops defining upper and lower bight portions. A body of liquid resinous backing material is formed, and the lower bight portions of the loops of yarn are moved into the liquid backing material so that these lower bight portions are substantially embedded within and penetrated by the backing material. The backing material is then solidified.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

I United States Patent 11 1 1111 7 3,862,872

Hoey 1 Jan. 28, 1975 1 APPARATUS FOR MAKING NON-WOVEN 3.173.823 3/1965 Guinard 161/66 3,376,178 4/1968 McA1pinc.. FILE FABRIC 3,383,259 5/1968 Cochran Inventor: Charles Edwin y u 3,533,871 10/1970 Zcntmycr Assignee Rohm and Haas p y 3,701,700 10/1972 Von Dcr Hcidc 161/66 Philadelphia. Pa.

1 Filed: 1972 Primary limminer-Marion E. McCzimish [2]] Appl. No.: 281,571

Related U.S. Application Data [62] gal Ser. No, 64,722, Aug. 18, 1970, Pat. No. ABSTRACT 52 s. Cl u 156/435 156/72 15 /17 Continuous strands of yarn are formed into loops dc- 156/552, 156/553, 161/66, ]6|/(,7 fining upper and lower bight portions. A body of liq- 51 1m. 01 D04h 11/04 uid resinous backing material is formed. and the lower 58 Field 61 Search 161/66, 62, 65, 67; bight portions of the loops of y n are moved into the 156/72, 435, 166, 176l78, 196, 199, 206, quid backing material so that these lower bight por- 289, 298, 306, 436, 539, 549, 552, 553 tions are substantially embedded within and penctrated by the backing material, The backing material 5 References Cited is then solidified.

UNITED STATES PATENTS 7/1964 Mills .1 156/435 X 7 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures P/JENTEU JAN 2 8 3-75 SHEET 1 OF 2 mm w wm 53m HOWLQ N Q OM r Q o Q ww m x A ow o/ 7 mm m aw 1 on &

PATENTEI] JAN 2 8 I975 I SHEET 2 OF 2 am? am APPARATUS FOR MAKING NON-WOVEN PILE FABRIC This application is a divisional application of copending U.S. application Ser. No. 64,722, filed Aug. 18, 1970 now U.S. Pat. No. 3,723,213.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a non-woven pile fabric which is particularly useful in the carpet industry.

In the past, carpets were made solely by weaving. In recent years, tufted carpet has replaced woven carpet to a substantial extent because of the low cost of the tufting operation. In the manufacture of a tufted carpet, yarns from a creel are reeded into a warp and these warp yarns are then formed into loops into a base fabric usually formed of jute or cotton. In order to lock the base yarns in position, the fabric is backed with filled latex. After backing, further strength is achieved by laminating a reinforced scrim to the carpet. Additionaly, foam may be drop coated onto the carpet back to provide an underlay. Weaving and tufting are both slow and laborious operations, and a woven or tufted carpet requires additional handling such as back coating and scrim reinforcement.

Known methods are provided in the prior art to manufacture flocked pile fabrics without weaving, but yarns cannot be employed in this process nor can loop pile fabrics be produced.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,206,343 discloses an arrangement wherein a viscous foaming composition is applied to a pile construction to form a flexible backing for the completed pile fabric. The arrangement as shown in this patent does not provide sufficient anchorage between the yarn and the backing material. Strong anchorage is of paramount importance particularly when the loops are not cut because of the possibility that a penetrating object such as a woman's high heel shoe might accidentally become caught in a loop and exert considerable pulling action on the yarn which would tend to cause it to separate from the backing material if an adequate interlock is not provided between the yarn and the backing material. This problem is also encountered where domestic animals such as dogs and cats dig their claws into the carpeting. Furthermore, a certain amount of scale weight is desirable in floor coverings to make them lie flat, and in the case of area rugs, stay put.

Many carpet yarns are made from relatively short fibers which are rather loosely twisted. If the backing material is adhered merely to the surface of the yarn andthe yarn is subsequently subjected to pulling action, the fibers in contact with the backing material will separate from the rest of the yarn which is then free to pull away. This problem is avoided in woven carpeting by actually placing backing or stuffer yarns over the bight portion of the loop so that it cannot escape. In tufted carpeting, the bight portion of the loop is pinched between the interstices of a base fabric and then well anchored by means of viscous backing resins and in many cases further stabilized by the laminations of a second fabric or scrim. The low density of a foamed resin as suggested in the aforementioned U.S. patent would not be adequate to provide the necessary anchorage. The foaming action of such backing material does not serve to sufficiently embed and surround the bight portions of the yarn in the backing material so that a good mechanical interlock is provided in addition to the chemical fusing action.

This patent further suggest the use of alternating rods to form the loops, these rods remaining in place during the resin application and foaming. The rods prevent the resin from embedding and surrounding the bight portions of the yarn so that it is impossible to obtain a good interlock. A slight amount of build-up of material on the rods will also result in serious problems of rod extraction and distortion of the pile fabric.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,142,604 discloses an arrangement for making non-woven pile fabrics wherein yarn is formed into a plurality of loops and the backing material is cxtruded onto the upper surfaces of the loops and subsequently compressed into place. Hlere again, the bight portions of the loops in the yarn are not sufficiently embedded and surrounded by the backing material so as to provide the desired mechanical interlock.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In the present invention, a body of liquid backing material is provided. The yarn is then formed into loops having upper and lower bight portions. The lower bight portions are then moved into the liquid backing material such that these lower bight portions are substantially embedded in and penetrated by the backing material. The backing material is then caused to solidify to provide the finished product.

The pile fabric formed according to the present invention includes a substantially continuous sheet ofresinous backing material. The yarn associated with the backing material defines a plurality of spaced curved bight portions which are substantially embedded within and penetrated by the backing material so as to provide not only fusion between the yarn and the backing material but also a good mechanical interlock within the yarn structure to prevent the yarn from pulling away from the backing material when in use. Such an embedded pile fabric is inherently flexible in both the warp and filling directions well as being strong and durable.

An embedded pile fabric according to the present invention is superior to the heat sealed or otherwise adhered arrangements as heretofore provided in the prior art since such known arrangements sealed only the surface fibers of a yarn to the substrate and these surface fibers often separate from the body of the yarn when the tuft or loop is pulled. In contrast to such conventional arrangements, the embedded bight portions of the product of the present invention, penetrated by the substrate material, hold the yarn firmly in place.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. I is a somewhat schematic illustration of a first form of apparatus for performing the method of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged view ofa portion of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1'.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged sectional view through the fin ished product;

FIG. 4 is a somewhat schematic illustration of a further form of apparatus for carrying out the method of the present invention; and

FIG. Sis an enlarged sectional view through a portion of the structure shown in FIG. 4.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to the drawings wherein like reference characters designate corresponding parts throughout the several views, a first form of apparatus for carrying out the present invention is illustrated in FIGS. I and 2. A creel indicated generally by reference numeral includes a plurality of individual cones of yarn 12. The strands 14 are fed from the cone and normally pass through individual yarn tubes to prevent the parallel yarns from becoming entangled and to form a warp. After passing through such tubes (not shown), the yarn passes through a conventional reed l6, and thence through a pair of nip rolls l8 and which are driven in the direction of the arrows so as to provide a feed means for drawing the yarn from the creel and into the loop-forming means comprising a pair of rolls and 32, these two rolls having teeth 34 and 36 formed thereon respectively which cooperate with one another as seen most clearly in FIG. 2 so that yarn passing between the two rolls will be formed into a plurality of loops. The yarn may be overfed by the nip rolls so that there is no tendency of the yarn to pull out from between the rolls 30 and 32. Roll 30 is preferably formed of a highly polished metal while the other roll 32 may be formed of a relatively soft rubber. This facilitates retention of the yarn by the rubber roll due to friction. Roll 32 may also comprise a vacuum roll to hold the yarn thereon after the teeth 36 of roll 32 move away from the teeth 34 of roll 30.

A conveyor means is provided for the yarn having loops formed therein, the conveyor means including an endless flexible belt 40 which is driven around a pair of spaced rolls 42 and 44. This conveyor belt is formed of a suitable resilient substance such as rubber and is relatively thick. The belt includes a plurality of spaced, tapered or parallel ribs 48 formed along the length thereof. As the conveyor belt moves around the guide rolls 42 and 44 in the direction indicated by the arrows, the ribs tend to separate from one another like a pair ofjaws. As the belt moves around roll 42, the ribs open up to receive the loops in the yarn from roll 32. As conveyor belt 40 moves around the bottom of roll 42 into a horizontal plane, the ribs again move toward one another to pinch the yarn therebetween and to hold it in place as the yarn moves lengthwise of the apparatus. When the conveyor belt subsequently passes around roll 44, the ribs will be separated from one another so as to release the loops of yarn.

A second conveyor means comprises a continuous belt 50 which moves around a pair of rolls 52 and 54, the belt being driven in the direction of the arrows as indicated on the drawings. A supply hopper 60 is pro vided for supplying liquid backing material to the upper surface of the conveyor belt 50. A doctor blade 62 or other suitable means is provided for adjusting the thickness of the body ofliquid backing material on the upper surface of the conveyor belt. As shown in FIG. 2, the tapered or parallel ribs 42 are of such length that the tips thereof do not contact the body of liquid backing material.

A plurality of heating units 64 are provided immediately beneath the upper part of the conveyor belt 50 for heating the liquid backing material to cause solidification thereof as it moves along the apparatus. A kiss roll 66 engages the belt 50 and is adapted to apply a suitable release agent carried within open top container 68 disposed beneath the conveyor belt.

After the pile fabric leaves the conveyor belt, it passes through a drying over indicated generally by reference number 70 and then is wound upon a take-up roll 72.

The yarn employed in the present invention may be any typical yarn as utilized in carpets and, for example, may comprise wool, cotton, Nylon 6, Nylon 66, polyester, etc. The backing material may comprise any suitable resinous substance: (a) which can be knifed or otherwise metered onto the conveyor belt 50, (h) which, in liquid form, (e.g., as a melt or latex) will wet the selected yarn sufficiently to effect penetration thereof, and (c) which, in its final form, meets the specifications for the end use application. Suitable sub stances are resins which can be liquefied and later solidified through temperature changes (hot melts and modifications thereof), products which polymerize such polyurethanes (not necessarily ofa foamablc variety), chemicals which gel (such as latices with gelling agents incorporated or N-methylol bis-acrylamide manufactured by American Cyanamid) or thickened latices (including acrylic emulsions) which can be dried to continuous film. In most cases, the resin system is filled with clay or other inert materials such as calcium carbonate, titanium dioxide and the like to provide economy, physical reinforcement of the resin and scale weight. With regard to the use of acrylic emulsions or blends or acrylic emulsions with natural or synthetic rubber latices, it is also possible to use nitrogeneous thermosetting resins to promote chemical reaction and gelation.

In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 1, the backing material may comprise a liquid latex which is dried to a continuous film as it moves along the conveyor belt.

In operation of the apparatus shown in FIG. I, the yarn is formed into loops as it passes between the rolls 30 and 32 and is then picked up by the conveyor belt 40. The yarn is moved downwardly by conveyor belt 40 and forced into the upper surface of the body of resinous material provided on the upper surface of conveyor belt 50. This body of resinous material is indicated by reference numeral 80 in FIGS. 2 and 3 of the drawings. It will be noted that the lower bight portions formed by the strands of yarn are thereby embedded within the backing material 80 so that a substantial amount (e.g., from about 25 percent to all) of each individual strand of yarn is embedded in and penetrated by the backing material 80. The relative position of the yarn and the backing material is retained since the conveyor belts 40 and 50 are moved parallel with one another at the same rate of linear movement. As the backing material moves from left to right as seen in FIG. I, it is solidified due to the heating effect produced by heaters 64. At the right-hand end of conveyor belt 40, the yarn is released, and at the right-hand end of conveyor belt 50, belt 50 separates from the backing material 80, whereupon the backing material 80 and the yarn 14 continue through the drying oven to complete the formation of the pile fabric. The loops of the pile fabric may subsequently be sheared to provide a cut pile fabric if so desired.

In the embodiment of FIG. 3 of the drawings, the lower bight portions 84 of the fabric are completely embedded within and surrounded by the backing material 80. The bottom edges of these bight portions are disposed substantially in a horizontal plane as seen in this figure, and are disposed a substantial distance from the opposite surfaces and 86 of the backing material. The upper bight portions 88 may be sheared as mentioned previously. It is apparent that by so embedding the lower bight portions 84 ofthe yarn in the backing material, a very good mechanical interlock is provided between the yarn and the backing material in addition to the fusing or bonding provided between the backing material and the yarn.

Referring now to FIGS. 4 and 5 of the drawings, a further moldified form of the invention is illustrated. As seen in these figures, a pair of drive nip rolls and 102 are provided and correspond to the nip rolls l8 and 20 previously described. Suitable strands of yarn 104 are fed between the nip rolls and thence about a guide roll 106 to a pair of loop forming rolls 110 and 112 having teeth 114 and 116 formed thereon respectively. The nip rolls may provide a certain degree of overfeed as mentioned previously.

The teeth on the loop forming rolls 110 and 112 cooperate in the same manner as aforedescribed. However, in this form of the invention roll 112 is a vacuum roll. As seen most clearly in H0. 5, roll 112 has a plurality of holes 120 formed therethrough which are positioned between the teeth ll6 formed thereon. Suitable means is provided for drawing a vacuum within the roll. A central shaft 124 extends through the roll, and a fixed radially extending support element 126 has a curved plate 128 formed thereon which is adapted to engage the inner surface of the roll and to block off the holes at the bottom of the roll so that the yarn will be released from the roll after it has been forced into the body of liquid backing material hereinafter described.

In addition, a curved plate 130 is provided adjacent the outer ends of the teeth 116 formed on the roll. This plate extends from a point adjacent the upper bights of the loops of yarn which are embedded in an associated body of backing material to a point adjacent the yarn as it enters the teeth of roll 112.

It is apparent that the yarn moving beneath the two rolls 110 and 112 is provided with suitable loops including upper and lower bight portions. The looped yarn material is then retained on roll 112 and is carried down and forced into the body of backing material adjacent thereto, whereupon it is released.

A continuous flexible conveyor belt passes around rolls 142 and 144. A hopper 146 provides a supply of liquid backing material, and a doctor blade 148 or other suitable means is provided for adjusting and maintaining the desired thickness of the layer of backing material on the conveyor belt which receives the looped yarn.

A plurality of cold rolls 150 engage the undersurface of the conveyor belt immediately adjacent roll 112 and serve to cool the conveyor belt and to solidify the backing material. The conveyor belt is made ofa substance which has a good heat transfer characteristic. A plurality of heat lamps 152 are provided for heating the belt just prior to its receiving backing material from supply means 146.

In operation of the apparatus shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, the looped material is carried downwardly by roll 112 and the lower bight portions of the yarn are embedded within and penetrated by the backing material 162 disposed on the upper surface of conveyor belt 140. As the backing material and embedded yarn moves in the direction of the arrows shown in FIG. 4, the backing material is solidified to form the finished product. This solidified backing material has no adhesion for the cold endless belt l4(l so that the material will readily separate from the endless belt at the righthand end thereof whereupon the finished pile fabric is wound up on a take-up roll 170.

In the arrangement shown in FIG. 4, a suitable backing material is chosen such as a hot melt of resinous material which is adapted to solidify upon cooling as it moves along the conveyor belt.

As this invention may be embodied in several forms without departing from the spirit or essential characteristics thereof, the present embodiment is therefore illustrative and not restrictive, and since the scope of the invention is defined by the appended claims, all changes that fall within the metezs and bounds of the claims or that form their functional as well as conjointly cooperative equivalents are therefore intended to be embraced by those claims.

I claim:

1. Apparatus for making non-woven pile fabric comprising:

yarn supply means, two intermeshing toothed rolls for forming loops having upper and lower bight portions in the yarn from the yarn supply means, backing material supply means, first conveyor means for conveying backing material from said backing material supply means beneath said loop forming means, second conveyor means for receiving yarn having loops formed therein from said loop forming means, said second conveyor means being disposed substantially parallel with and above said first conveyor means, said second conveyor means comprising a continuous flexible belt having a plurality of spaced ribs formed thereon, end rolls at each end of said second conveyor, said flexible belt being in position to travel around said rolls, said loop forming means being positioned adjacent one of said end rolls, the teeth ofone of said loop forming rolls intermeshing with the ribs of said flexible belt while said belt is positioned on one of said end rolls whereby the looped yarn is received in said second conveyor and pinched by said ribs during the passage of said belt between said end rolls, said second conveyor means being so spaced from said first conveyor that the lower bight portions of the loops formed in the yarn are moved downwardly into the body of backing material on said first conveyor means and said ribs do not contact said backing material.

2. Apparatus according to claim 1 wherein one of the two intermeshing tooth rolls is formed of metal and the other of said rolls is formed of rubber.

3. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 including feed means for feeding yarn to said loop-forming means.

4. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 including means for applying a release agent to said belt means.

5. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 including heating means disposed adjacent said conveyor means.

6. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 including cooling means disposed adjacent said first conveyor means.

7. Apparatus defined in claim 1 wherein said backing material supply means is adapted to supply liquid backing material and said apparatus includes means for ad justing the thickness of the body of liquid backing material on said first conveyor means.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3142611 *Dec 12, 1960Jul 28, 1964Jennings Engineering CompanyNon-woven pile fabrics and methods of their manufacture
US3173823 *Jun 16, 1961Mar 16, 1965Guinard John EPiled fabric and the method of and apparatus for manufacturing the same
US3376178 *May 3, 1965Apr 2, 1968William D. McalpineCarpetmaking method and apparatus
US3383259 *May 4, 1964May 14, 1968Madison Res & Dev CorpMethod of making a tufted fabric
US3533871 *Apr 10, 1968Oct 13, 1970Armstrong Cork CoNonwoven tufted fabric by crimping
US3701700 *Aug 5, 1970Oct 31, 1972Thiokol Chemical CorpProcess for producing a continuous non-woven fabric
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5254194 *Aug 21, 1991Oct 19, 1993Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyCoated abrasive sheet material with loop material for attachment incorporated therein
US5354591 *Aug 2, 1993Oct 11, 1994Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyCoated abrasive sheet material with loop material for attachment incorporated therein
US5611791 *Jan 11, 1996Mar 18, 1997Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanySheet of loop material, and garments having such loop material incorporated therein
US5616394 *Jun 1, 1995Apr 1, 1997Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanySheet of loop material, and garments having such loop material incorporated therein
US5643397 *Jun 1, 1995Jul 1, 1997Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyEquipment for forming a sheet of loop material
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/435, 156/178, 156/72, 428/92, 428/96, 156/552, 156/553
International ClassificationD04H11/04, D04H11/00
Cooperative ClassificationD04H11/04
European ClassificationD04H11/04