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Publication numberUS3862874 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 28, 1975
Filing dateMar 12, 1973
Priority dateMar 12, 1973
Publication numberUS 3862874 A, US 3862874A, US-A-3862874, US3862874 A, US3862874A
InventorsDickey Helen M, Hopper Joan M
Original AssigneeDickey Helen M, Hopper Joan M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Modular rug construction
US 3862874 A
Abstract
A rug construction comprising a plurality of modular rug units having fastener elements for removably securing said modular rug units to a tape grid-work which may optionally be bonded to a floor whereby the modular rug units may be selectively attached and detached from the grid-work for washing, replacement or repair.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Hopper et a1.

1 1 Jan. 28, 1975 1 1 MODULAR RUG CONSTRUCTION [76] Inventors: Joan M. Hopper, 4236 Seneca St.,

West Seneca, NY. 14224; Helen M. Dickey, 33 Wabash, Kenmore, NY. 14217 22 Filed: Mar. 12, 1973 211 App]. No.: 339,713

[52] U.S. Cl 161/36, 52/384, 161/37,

161/48, 161/63 [51] Int. Cl B32b 3/10, B32b 3/10 [58] Field of Search 161/36, 37, 48, 62, 63,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1.146.696 7/1915 Eisenkramer 161/48 2.771.383 11/1956 Fine 161/63 X 3.121.977 2/1964 Bersudsky 52/3118 X 3.402.094 9/1968 Lcvitch 161/63 X 3.704.197 11/1972 Bahlo 161/67 3.751.327 8/1973 Hauslcr 161/37 X OTHER PUBLICATIONS Article in Retailing Daily, Feb. 1. 1954.

Primary Examiner-Mayer Weinblatt Assistant Examiner-Edith L. Rollins Attorney, Agent, or Firm.loseph P. Gastcl [57] ABSTRACT A rug construction comprising a plurality of modular rug units having fastener elements for removably securing said modular rug units to a tape grid-work which may optionally be bonded to a floor whereby the modular rug units may be selectively attached and detached from the grid-work for washing, replacement or repair.

8. Claims, 4 Drawing Figures MODULAR RUG CONSTRUCTION The present invention relates to an improved rug construction and more particularly to one which is fabricated from modular rug units which may be selectively attached and detached relative to each other.

In the past, rugs and carpets which were used in the home were generally of the type which were fabricated out of one single piece of material. Such rugs were too large to be washed in a home washing machine. In addition, in the event such a rug experienced wear in a certain area, there was no way of replacing only the worn area. It is with overcoming of the foregoing deficiencies of prior rug constructions that the present invention is concerned.

It is accordingly the primary object of the present invention to provide an improved rug construction having modular rug units which are secured relative to each other in a detachable manner so that the rug may be disassembled into smaller pieces for washing and so that certain portions of the rug can be replaced or shifted around to different positions in the rug as desired. Other objects and attendant advantages of the present invention will readily be perceived hereafter.

The improved rug construction of the present invention comprises a plurality of modular rug units, and attachment means for detachably securing said modular units relative to each other. In its more specific aspect, the improved rug construction of the present invention includes a grid-work of tape which may optionally be secured to a floor. The modular ring units in turn are detachably secured to the grid-work.

The various aspects of the present invention will be more readily understood when the following portions of the specification are read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary perspective view of the improved rug construction of the present invention laid out on a floor;

FIG 2 is a fragmentary plan view of the tape gridwork which is used to hold the modular rug units in assembled relationship;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary cross sectional view taken substantially along line 3-3 of FIG. 2; and

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary cross sectional view taken substantially in the direction of line 4-4 of FIG. 1.

The improved modular rug construction of the present invention includes a grid-work ll of crossing tapes l2 and 13 which are secured to floor 14, and modular rug units 15 are detachably secured to the tape grid-work 11. Because each modular rug unit 15 is detachably secured to tapes 12 and 13, it can be removed for replacement or repair, or for washing, as desired. Furthermore, because the modular units 15 are relatively small, when they are separated from the gridwork 11, they can be washed in an ordinary home-type washing machine.

In accordance with the embodiment of the invention as shown in FIGS. 1-4, the grid-work 11 consists of parallel tapes 13 having a pressure-sensitive adhesive 16 on their undersides to securely bond these tapes to floor 14. Parallel tapes 12 also have a pressure-sensitive adhesive 18 on their undersides so as to bond them securely to the floor in the zones between tapes l3 and also bond them securely to the upper surfaces of tapes 13 where they cross tapes 13.

The initial steps in assembling a modular rug construction such as shown in FIG. 1 is to lay out tapes 12 and 13 into the grid-work 11, as shown, and press these tapes into secure engagement with the floor 14. Furthermore, tapes [6 are laid out where the wall meets the floor, and these tapes are analogous to tapes [2 and 13 but are only half their width because they are to be secured only to one edge of a rug module, and not to the adjacent abutting edges of two modules 15.

Tapes l2 possess a pattern of the male portions 17 of conventional snap fasteners 20 thereon. This pattern includes four male snap fastener portions 17 overlying each junction of tapes l2 and 13. Between adjacent sets of four male snap fastener portions 17 on each tape 12 are two sets of two male fastener portions 17', which are equidistant from each other and from the sets having four portions 17. Tapes 13 do not have any male fastener portions in the areas where fastener portions 17 cross over them. However, tapes 13 do have two pairs of male snap fastener portions 17" spaced equally from each other and from each cluster of four fastener portions 17 which are located above the junctions of tapes l2 and 13. As can be seen from FIG. 2, the male fastener portions l7, l7 and 17" are located so that they are symmetrical with the centerlines (not numbered) of tapes l2 and 13.

Each edge of each modular rug unit 15 has four female snap fastener portions 19 suitably secured thereto by bonding or clamping, and such female snap fastener portions 19 securely engage the male fastener portions 17, 17' 17" which they overlie: on tapes l2 and 13, so that when the modular rug units 15 are assembled on the grid-work 11, they will lie in edge-to-edge abutting relationship. It will be appreciated that the female snap fastener portions 19 are attached to units 15 so as to be hidden from view.

It can thus be seen that each modular rug unit 15 can be selectively detached from the grid-work 11 so that it can be replaced or repaired or washed. Furthermore, since units 15 are relatively small, they can be washed in a conventional home washing machine. Furthermore, since the grid-work 11 is attached to the floor by means of pressure-sensitive adhesive, it can be removed easily from the floor when the rug is no longer desired or when another type of floor covering is desired.

In addition it will be appreciated that while each modular rug unit 15 has been shown as being in the shape of a square, it can be in the shape of a rectangle or any other shape which is convenient or desirable. In addition, while conventional male-female snap fasteners have been shown as being the fastening means for securing the modular rug units 15 to the grid-work, it will be appreciated that any other type of fastening means may be utilized. In this respect, it may be desirable to use hook-pile type of fabric connectors instead of the male-female snap fasteners, or it may be desirable to use any other type of attachment means which will permit selective attachment and detachment of the modular rug units 15 from the grid-work 11.

While the above description has disclosed the gridwork 11 as being secured to the floor by means of pressure-sensitive adhesive, it will be appreciated that if desired it can be secured by tacks or the like. Furthermore, if desired, the grid-work 11 may be left unattached from the floor so that the rug may be in the nature of a movable area rug. In this respect, the mere laying out of a grid-work 11 on the floor, without attaching it to the floor, will serve to hold the modular rug units in assembled relationship with respect to each other when they are secured to grid 11 because the attachment of the rug units 15 to tapes l2 and 13 will produce an entire rug. If desired, instead of attaching the rug units 15 to tapes, which are not attached to the floor, certain of the rug units 15 may have tapes attached to themselves so that one rug unit, such as 15,

would have tapes attached to certain of its sides and the adjacent rug unit 15 would have fasteners thereon which selectively attaches said adjacent rug unit to the tape secured to the other rug unit.

lt can thus be seen that the improved rug construction of the present invention provides an arrangement by which modular rug units can be assembled to produce an entire rug which may be secured to the floor or by which the rug units may be secured to each other and the entire rug may be free for movement on the floor. It will also be appreciated that the principles of the present invention are applicable to all types of rugs and carpets, practically regardless of their type of weave or construction, as long as they can support some sort of fastener elements thereon.

While preferred embodiments of the present invention have been disclosed, it will readily be appreciated that the present invention is not limited thereto but may be otherwise embodied within the scope of the following claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A modular rug construction comprising a plurality of modular rug units, and attachment means for detachably securing said modular rug units relative to each other, said attachment means comprising tape means in the form of elongated strips having first fastener means thereon, and second fastener means on said modular rug units for selective engagement and disengagement with said first fastener means.

2. A modular rug construction as set forth in claim 1 wherein said tape means includes securing means for securing said tape means to a floor.

3. A modular rug construction as set forth in claim 2 wherein said securing means comprises pressure sensitive adhesive on the underside of said tape means.

4. A modular rug construction as set forth in claim 1 wherein said tape means comprises a grid-work of crossing tapes and wherein said second fastener means are located along the edges of said modular rug units.

5. A modular rug construction as set forth in claim 4 wherein said modular rug units are in the shape of squares.

6. A modular rug construction as set forth in claim 4 wherein said grid-work comprises a plurality of first parallel tapes extending in a first direction and a plurality of second parallel tapes extending in a second direction which is substantially perpendicular to said first direction.

7. A modular rug construction as set forth in claim 6 wherein said first fastener means comprises third fastener means on said first tapes with said third fastener means being located in spaced clusters of four with two clusters of two therebetween, and fourth fastener means on said second tapes arranged in spaced clusters of two located between the areas where said clusters of four are located when said first and second tapes are assembled into said grid-work.

8. A modular rug construction as set forth in claim 6 including means for attaching said first tapes to said second tapes.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1146696 *Dec 30, 1914Jul 13, 1915Oscar EisenkramerSnap-fastener binding.
US2038368 *Jan 22, 1934Apr 21, 1936Lang JohnCarpet or rug made of sponge material
US2109402 *May 12, 1934Feb 22, 1938George E GagnierCarpet fastener
US2293614 *Mar 11, 1939Aug 18, 1942United Carr Fastener CorpFastener member and fastener installation
US2771383 *Jan 26, 1954Nov 20, 1956Robert FineCombination floor covering
US3121977 *Feb 8, 1956Feb 25, 1964Bersudsky SidneyBuilding panel structure
US3402094 *Mar 20, 1964Sep 17, 1968Burlington Industries IncCarpet tile
US3704197 *Apr 5, 1971Nov 28, 1972Gen Felt Ind IncRemovable floor covering
US3751327 *Aug 19, 1971Aug 7, 1973D HauslerModular carpet system
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4238268 *Feb 7, 1979Dec 9, 1980Mccreary Tire And Rubber CompanyTire building machine ply turn-down finger assembly
US4242389 *Apr 10, 1979Dec 30, 1980World Carpets, Inc.Carpet web having patterned adhesive segments on the backing thereof and method of manufacture of the same
US4561232 *Jun 22, 1984Dec 31, 1985Tate Architectural Products, Inc.Modular tile with positioning means for use with an access floor panel system
US4921741 *Jun 21, 1988May 1, 1990Carlisle Tire & Rubber CompanyRecreation surface and tile fastening scheme
US5179749 *May 6, 1991Jan 19, 1993Milliken Research CorporationSeamless modular tile
US5976290 *Oct 14, 1997Nov 2, 1999Orcon CorporationApparatus and method for seaming carpets
US6328500Jan 24, 2000Dec 11, 2001Tamara L. RubioSegmented toy roadway, toy roadway segment, and method of making same
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US9062463 *Nov 20, 2013Jun 23, 2015Adam CHOJNOWSKIConstruction set for covering substrate, in particular floor substrate
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US20140150367 *Nov 20, 2013Jun 5, 2014Adam CHOJNOWSKIConstruction set for covering substrate, in particular floor substrate
EP0102211A2Aug 10, 1983Mar 7, 1984Tate Architectural Products, Inc.Modular tile with positioning means for use with an access floor panel system
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WO2001043925A1 *Oct 3, 2000Jun 21, 2001Interface, Inc.Carpet tile with cutout section, method and apparatus for production and method of installation
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/47, 428/62, 428/58, 428/53, 52/384, 428/91
International ClassificationE04F15/10
Cooperative ClassificationE04F15/10
European ClassificationE04F15/10