Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3862876 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 28, 1975
Filing dateApr 2, 1973
Priority dateApr 2, 1973
Publication numberUS 3862876 A, US 3862876A, US-A-3862876, US3862876 A, US3862876A
InventorsJames E Graves
Original AssigneeJames E Graves
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Protective edge weighted cover cloth
US 3862876 A
Abstract
A protective cover cloth having continuous flexible weights secured along at least two opposed edges for securing the cover against wind blowing, etc... The cover cloth may be made from insulated materials and heated for curing concrete. Sand, shot or other particulate material, possibly in individual bags, is inserted in a wide hem or tubes attached along the edges of the cover.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 11 1 Graves [111 3,862,876 1 1 Jan. 28, 1975 1541 RQTEC YE. DGE WEIGHT D OVER.

cum-1 [76] Inventor: James E. Graves, 485 Jay 51.,

Lakewood, Colo. 80215 [22] Filed: Apr. 2, 1973 [21] Appl. No.1 347,149

[52] 11.5. CI 161/44, 52/3, 52/23, 161/100, 161/149, 161/162 [51] int. Cl B32b 3/02, B321) 3/04, 8321) 5/16 [58] Field of Search 161/44, 99, 100, 149, 162; 52/23, 23, 4

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 325,365 9/1835 Simonds 52/3 691,318 1/1902 Van Buren 52/3 1.544507 6/1925 Van Bihher 161/100 1.583547 5/1926 Greenberg 161/100X Hendcl 161/44 X 2,565,219 8/1951 Gardiner ct a1 161/44 X 2,613,306 10/1952 Waltersdurl' cl ul. 161/44 X 2,623,150 12/1952 Buccher, Jr. ct 11. 161/149 X 2,883,676 4/1959 Kwzlke 52/3 X 2.94.3,380 7/1960 161/44 3,637,454 1/1972 Pnvcrnick 161/44 Primary l'.'.\'amim'r Philip Dier Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Richard D. Law

[57] ABSTRACT A protective cover cloth having continuous flexible weights secured along at least two opposed edges for securing the cover against wind blowing, etc... The cover cloth may be made from insulated materials and heated for curing concrete. Sand, shot or other particulate material, possibly in individual bags, is inserted in a wide hem or tubes attached along the edges of the cover.

8 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures 'PATENTEU JANE 8 I975 FIG.4

PROTECTIVE EDGE WEIGHTED COVER CLOTH Cover cloths, which include tarpaulins, drop cloths, blankets, sheets, wrapping and the like, have many uses both inside and outside various types of structures. A few of such pieces include coverings for objects during painting, protection of various items from adverse weather conditions, protection for stored items and the like. All such coverings are sheet like material, and as such, they are subject to being disarrange d from their spread-out covering position over the desired area by many different factors. People, vehicles, wind and the like can cause a disarray of the coverings so as to expose the covered objects.

It is, therefore, an object and advantage of the present invention to provide a covering having at least two opposed, continuously weighted edges which tend to hold the covering in a spread-out position.

Another object of the invention is to provide an inexpensive and simple means for holding a covering spread over any desired area against disarrangement by wind or other extraneous forces.

Still another object and advantage of the invention is to provide acovering which has attached weights providing self-contained hold-down means.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a rectangular covering having four edges containing continuous flexible weight material for securing such covering in a spreadout condition.

An additional object of the invention is to provide insulated and/or heated rectangular covering having flexible weight means continuously extending around the periphery of such covering for securing the covering in spread-out position.

A further object of the invention is to provide a selfcontained covering for securing the same over desired areas, but which is sufficiently light for easy transportation and still provide a secure covering over a desired area under adverse conditions.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention may be readily ascertained by referring to the following description and appended illustrations in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one form of the rectangular covering according to the invention illustrating one form of weighting means extending completely around the periphery of the rectangular covering;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of the device of FIG. 1 taken along section lines 2-2;

FIG. 3 is a modified form of a rectangular cover showing continuous weighting on two opposed edges of the covering;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of a modified form of covering providing an insulating covering for curing concrete and the like;

FIG. 5 is a schematic perspective view of a rectangular covering including a weighted flexible periphery and including heating wires in the insulated body; and

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional detail view of a modified form of securing means for flexible weighting material along the edge of a cover cloth.

In the device illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, a rectangular sheet material cover 10 may be formed of any size and any desired material. For example, the cover may be made from cloth of woven, natural or synthetic fibers, may be of continuous sheet material such as synthetic plastic film or the like, may be of metal covered sheet material such as aluminum foil on canvas, or the like, or may be of any desired flexible cloth-like material used for covering any object. The sheet-like material may be made inany size and generally is made rectangular for ease of manufacture and use.

Opposed edges 12 and 14 are folded back along themselves and are sewn together to form a pocket or wide hem which extends along the length of the cloth 10. In a similar manner, edges 16 and 18 are folded back along themselves and are sewn to form an elongated pocket along the edge of the cloth. As shown in FIG. 2, edge 12 is folded back along itself and sewn by stitching 13 extending along the edge and in the same manner, edge 14 is folded back along itself and is stitched at 15, both forming an elongated pocket along the edge. In a similar manner, the edges 16 and 18 are folded and stitched to form an elongated pocket. The pocket at edge 12 is filled with sand, shot, or other granular or particulate weighting material 20 and the pocket at edge 14 is likewise filled with a similar material 21. The weighting material 20 and 21 is preferably granular so as to form a continuous weight which is flexible and easy to handle. The pockets at edges 16 and 18 are similarly filled with the particulate material. With the pockets sewn tight, the cloth may be spread out and used to cover any desired item. The weighted edge holds the cloth from disarray by wind, people, etc. In a 12 ft. by l5 ft. canvas tarp, with the edges rolled back and sewn, about 40 to 50 pounds of sand may be placed in the tubes along the edges to provide weighting material for the canvas. If desired, small separate bags of sand may be placed in the hem formed by the turning back and stitching rather than filling the tube with free sand. By the use of the small bags, the weighting material may be made semi-permanent since a corner may be left open for removal of the bags if desired.

The modification shown in FIG. 3 includes a rectangular cover 25 having opposed edges 26 and 27 turned back upon themselves and edge 26 has stitching 28 therealong to form a tube and edge 27 has stitching 29 therealong to form a tube along that side. The ends 30 and 31 of the tube 26 may be closed after insertion of free sand, shot or particulate material, or insertion of individual bags 28a containing this material. Stitching 29a, across the tube 26, may be provided to hold the bags or loose material in position. In a similar manner, the tube 27 has its ends 32 and 33 closed after the insertion of weighting material in the edge. The size of the cloth 25 is, of course, determined by the size of the object over which it will be placed.

The modification of FIG. 4 utilizes an insulated cover 35 with edges 36 and 37 folded back upon themselves and stitched to form tubes. Weighting material 38, as described above, is placed in the tube 36 and weighting material 39 is placed in the tube 37 to form flexible edge weights for the insulated cloth 35. In a similar manner, the edge 40 is folded back upon itself and stitched to provide a tube for holding the weighting material for the cover.

The modification of FIG. 5 includes a cover or insulating blanket 45 having edges 46, 47, 48 and 49 folded back along themselves and sewn to form tubes in which weighting material is placed. The insulated blanket 45 has included therein, electric heating coils 50 to provide heat for curing cement or the like, and a connection 51, illustrated as a two prong plug, is arranged to be connected to an electrical source to provide current for the coils in the blanket 45. The heated insulated blanket is useful for curing concrete in cold weather where it is desirable to maintain the temperature of the concrete above freezing at least for its initial setting period.

The modification of FIG. 6 illustrates a cover 60 having a tube 61 extended along its edge filled with a weighting material 62. The tube 61 extends along the length of an edge of the cover 60 and is fastened by means of a plurality of snap fasteners 63 to snap fasteners 64 secured in the edge of the cover. This provides a semi-permanent means of affixing weighting tubes along all the edges of the cover. Obviously, various types of fasteners may be used to secure the tubes of weighting material along the cover edges, and these would include zippers, Velcro fasteners, and the like. Preferably, the tube should extend along the full edge of the cover to prevent bulges in the edge which permits wind to enter under the edges and disarray the spread-out cover.

The weighting materials should extend along the full edge of the drop cloths or covers, and in the preferred form, the weighting material extends along all peripheral edges as a continuous flexible weight. This provides means for securing the edges of the cloth to the supporting material, which may be the ground, floor, etc. to prevent wind from coming under the edge of the cloth, filling the same and blowing the cloth away or disarraying it from its spread-out position. As pointed out above, 40 or 50 pounds of sand are sufficient to weight a 12 X 15 ft. drop cloth,'and in similar manner, various weights may be used for different sizes of cover cloth depending on the use for which it will be made.

By having the weighting material continuous and flexi-' ble, the weighted edge conforms to the contours of the surface on which the cloth is spread, thus providing a secure means for holding the cloth down under adverse conditions.

Although a weighted, rectangular drop cloth or cover has been shown and described in this specification, it is to be understood that this shape is illustrative and the cover may be provided in any shape desired, such as circular, oblong or irregular. In addition, it is obvious that this invention is not to be limited to the exact description disclosed, and that changes in detail and construction may be made therein within the scope of the invention without departing from the spirit thereof.

Inflatable tubes may be sewn or otherwise attached to the cover cloth for arching it over fresh concrete.

For example, an inflatable tube of 2 or 3 inches diameter may be sewn around the periphery of a 12 ft. X 7 /2 ft. drop cloth inside the weight tubes as described for the device of FIG. 1. A single inflatable tube across the center, e.g., on the center 6 feet from each end, along with the end inflatable tubes permits the cover cloth to be arched over fresh concrete.

I claim:

1. A cover cloth article for covering an object or an area, said article comprising:

a. a body of flexible sheet material;

b. flexible weight means arranged continuously along at least opposite edges of said body, said flexible weight means being a loose, particulate weight material; and

0. means for securing said weight means to the edge of said body, said securing means being at least one elongated closed tube formed from flexible material and arranged to contain the particulate material of said flexible weight means, said flexible elongated tube being joined to the edge of said body for holding the body over said object or area to prevent its disarray by extrinsic forces such as wind.

2. A cover cloth article as defined in claim 1, wherein said body of sheet material is rectangular.

3. A cover cloth article as defined in claim 1, wherein said flexible weight means is arranged continuously around the entire perimeter edge of said body.

4. A cover cloth article as defined in claim 1 wherein said elongated flexible tube includes an edge of said body which is folded back on itself with the edge attached to said body and with the ends of said tube closed to contain the particulate weight material therein.

5. A cover cloth article as defined in claim 1, wherein said particulate weight material is sand.

6. A cover cloth article as defined in claim 1 wherein said flexible weight means is a plurality of individual elongated bags filled with the loose particulate weight material; and

said bags are enclosed within said elongated tube.

7. A cover cloth article as defined in claim 1 wherein said securing means includes detachable fastener means for joining said elongated tube to the edge of said body.

8. A cover cloth article as defined in claim 7, wherein said detachable fastener means is a plurality of snap fasteners spaced along said body edge.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US325365 *Sep 1, 1885 Monds
US691318 *Apr 30, 1901Jan 14, 1902Thomas L MetcalfeCover for grain-shocks, &c.
US1544507 *Apr 5, 1921Jun 30, 1925Congoleum CompanyBinder for floor coverings
US1583547 *Apr 21, 1924May 4, 1926Greenberg Robert WTable mat
US1622035 *Nov 24, 1924Mar 22, 1927E W Sutton Carpet Lining CorpRug pad
US2565219 *May 15, 1946Aug 21, 1951Donald W GardinerSail and method of manufacture of same
US2613306 *Feb 28, 1949Oct 7, 1952Gen ElectricElectrical wiring panel
US2623150 *Jun 15, 1951Dec 23, 1952Thermoray CorpElectrical radiant heating panel
US2883676 *Sep 30, 1957Apr 28, 1959Kwake John PSwimming pool cover
US2943380 *May 7, 1959Jul 5, 1960Cor Amber SwDropcloth
US3637454 *Sep 12, 1969Jan 25, 1972Aljen Mfg CoFeeding mat
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4043085 *Jul 2, 1976Aug 23, 1977Morishita Chemical Industry Co. Ltd.Polyolefin
US4122637 *Apr 22, 1977Oct 31, 1978Glen V. RungeWindrow retainer, and method of confining windrows
US4272575 *Dec 28, 1979Jun 9, 1981Egigian Robert SAnchor mat
US4278719 *Oct 15, 1979Jul 14, 1981Sarnecki Mildred AWaterproof backed towel
US4301206 *Nov 8, 1979Nov 17, 1981Mills James SBound edges
US4408408 *Jul 10, 1981Oct 11, 1983Eng Fe CDecorative mounting system
US4468424 *Jan 19, 1983Aug 28, 1984Cartwright Robert BSheets of pliant, heat resistant material
US4499133 *May 9, 1983Feb 12, 1985Prince Connie JPocketed beach towels
US4634618 *Jun 19, 1985Jan 6, 1987Greer Keith BMetal cord sewn in edges; beach towels
US4673184 *Dec 26, 1984Jun 16, 1987Roy SansoresSeating surface/gameboard device
US4682447 *Jan 3, 1986Jul 28, 1987Mobil Oil CorporationLightweight tarpaulin
US4690585 *Jan 17, 1985Sep 1, 1987Holmberg Dick LErosion control foundation mat and method
US4889446 *Dec 22, 1986Dec 26, 1989Holmberg Dick LErosion control foundation mat and method
US4961981 *Mar 13, 1989Oct 9, 1990Keegan Patrick KWeighted netting
US5025604 *Jan 9, 1990Jun 25, 1991Yeamans Robert CPerimeter securement assembly for roof deck covering provided with apertured overlay
US5082707 *Feb 7, 1990Jan 21, 1992Fazio Michele PDisposable beach towel
US5121957 *Jan 11, 1991Jun 16, 1992Shea William F OProtector and procedure for protecting vehicle accident victims against broken glass and other debris
US5158395 *May 12, 1989Oct 27, 1992Holmberg Dick LErosion control foundation mat and method
US5364156 *Aug 30, 1993Nov 15, 1994Zerow Danne JWeighted, foldable vehicle cover
US5400549 *Oct 22, 1993Mar 28, 1995Morgan; William D.Insulated removable pond cover
US5579610 *Aug 3, 1995Dec 3, 1996Jackson; Robert L.Leaf retaining net
US5580635 *Mar 6, 1995Dec 3, 1996Hoheisel; Mark G.Collection tarpaulin
US5761853 *Nov 2, 1995Jun 9, 1998Stephen TrosperTo prevent soiling or splatter by paint
US5930956 *Sep 30, 1997Aug 3, 1999Stephen TrosperDevice to prevent soiling or splatter by paint
US6170100May 19, 1998Jan 9, 2001Gray Matter Holdings, LlcSelf-opening towel
US6176050 *Mar 15, 1999Jan 23, 2001Ted GowerFlexible protective wind abatement system
US6343391Aug 15, 2000Feb 5, 2002Gray Matter Holdings, LlcTowel-mat with a frame member and removably attached membranes
US6361249 *Mar 8, 2000Mar 26, 2002Samian Investments Inc.Negative air pressure cover
US6363661Oct 10, 2000Apr 2, 2002Preston D. MyersProtective cover
US6394528Jul 12, 2001May 28, 2002Jeremy HoenackBallistically deployed vehicle and utility covers
US6478038Aug 4, 2000Nov 12, 2002Gray Matter Holdings, LlcCollapsible shade for a towel mat
US6485344Jan 30, 2001Nov 26, 2002Gray Matter Holdings, LlcCollapsible flotation device
US6519793Jul 18, 2001Feb 18, 2003Gray Matter Holdings LlcCollapsible mat with removable portion and method of making same
US6575518 *Dec 21, 2001Jun 10, 2003Aero Industries, Inc.Flexible cover system for an open-topped container
US6595227Jan 19, 2001Jul 22, 2003Gray Matter Holdings, LlcSelf-opening shades and methods of using the same
US6618868 *Feb 12, 2001Sep 16, 2003Jeff F. MinnickLightweight insulated spa cover and method therefor
US6634040Jan 14, 2002Oct 21, 2003Gray Matter Holdings, LlcTowel-mat with a frame member and removably attached membranes
US6658801Jul 3, 2001Dec 9, 2003Patrick KilduffPortable fire curtain system
US6659688Aug 20, 2002Dec 9, 2003Baumgartner Environics, Inc.Waste vessel coverings comprising multilayer geotextiles having photostability and floatation strips formed from open-cell foams, used for suppressing release of odors or waste gases
US6691344Feb 5, 2003Feb 17, 2004Brian E. Le GetteCollapsible mat with removable portion and method of making same
US6739095 *Nov 21, 2002May 25, 2004Peter N. GlynosTent with anchors
US6754919May 24, 2001Jun 29, 2004Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Protective cover article
US6823883 *Oct 24, 2002Nov 30, 2004Keith SearsCollapsible, self-supporting, portable sun-screen apparatus
US6851891Sep 10, 2003Feb 8, 2005Baumgartner Environics, Inc.Organic slurry storage basin cover
US6865852Nov 9, 2001Mar 15, 2005Targus International, Inc.Flexible wind abatement system
US6886299May 14, 2002May 3, 2005Targus International, Inc.Blast curtain
US6915537Aug 7, 2003Jul 12, 2005Kelsyus, LlcFrame member and attached membranes
US6942005Jul 18, 2003Sep 13, 2005Kelsyus, LlcSelf-opening enclosure
US6966152Jul 26, 2004Nov 22, 2005Glynos Peter NProtective tarp with plural separated anchors
US6971936Feb 21, 2003Dec 6, 2005Kelsyus, LlcCollapsible flotation device having support member
US7097524Nov 18, 2002Aug 29, 2006Kelsyus, LlcCollapsible flotation device
US7127754Jul 12, 2005Oct 31, 2006Kelsyus, LlcFrame member and attached membranes
US7134930Jun 3, 2005Nov 14, 2006Kelsyus, LlcCollapsible flotation device
US7147528May 18, 2004Dec 12, 2006Kelsyus, LlcCollapsible flotation device
US7243384Feb 17, 2006Jul 17, 2007Kelsyus, LlcCollapsible mat with removable portion and method of making same
US7246468 *Mar 21, 2003Jul 24, 2007Forbis Sr Jack RShade assembly for storage tank and method of use thereof
US7270617Nov 25, 2003Sep 18, 2007Aer-Flo Canvas Products, Inc.Method for protecting at least one baseball area of a baseball playing field
US7335080Oct 30, 2006Feb 26, 2008Kelsyus, LlcCollapsible flotation device
US7374059Nov 2, 2001May 20, 2008Industrial And Environmental Concepts, Inc.Covering systems and venting methods
US7490378Oct 30, 2006Feb 17, 2009Kelsyus, LlcFrame member and attached membranes
US7494433 *Jul 16, 2007Feb 24, 2009Aer-Flo Canvas Products, Inc.Baseball area protection system and method
US7500893Feb 8, 2008Mar 10, 2009Kelsyus, LlcCollapsible flotation device
US7661160 *Feb 5, 2009Feb 16, 2010Adams David MBeach blanket
US7665164Feb 17, 2009Feb 23, 2010Kelsyus, LlcFrame member and attached membranes
US7690134 *Nov 26, 2004Apr 6, 2010Yi-Zoong KimCutoff device with liquid bag
US7691465Aug 31, 2007Apr 6, 2010The Wooster Brush CompanyDrop cloth systems and methods of using same
US7727038May 31, 2005Jun 1, 2010Kelsyus, LlcCollapsible flotation device having back support member
US7785008 *Jul 27, 2005Aug 31, 2010Portaquip LlcPlanar loaded operably conformable material containment system
US7793390Aug 3, 2007Sep 14, 2010Layfield Geosynthetics & Industrial Fabrics Ltd.Method of and apparatus for connecting floating covers
US7805897Sep 4, 2007Oct 5, 2010Jhrg, LlcStorm panel for protecting windows and doors during high winds
US7811145Mar 9, 2009Oct 12, 2010Kelsyus, LlcCollapsible flotation device
US7841151 *Jan 15, 2008Nov 30, 2010The Matworks Company, LLCEdge-molding system for floor coverings
US7841378Dec 1, 2005Nov 30, 2010Aer-Flo Canvas Products, Inc.Ballasted wind shielding system and method
US7900408Jun 25, 2007Mar 8, 2011Jhrg, LlcStorm panel for protecting windows and doors during high winds
US8025595Feb 23, 2009Sep 27, 2011Aer-Flo Canvas Products, Inc.Baseball area protection system and method
US8066540May 27, 2010Nov 29, 2011Kelsyus, LlcCollapsible flotation device having back support
US8079888Sep 24, 2010Dec 20, 2011Kelsyus, LlcCollapsible flotation device
US8082970 *May 17, 2005Dec 27, 2011Ted GowerInflatable barrier
US8100785 *Mar 16, 2011Jan 24, 2012Aer-Flo Canvas Products, Inc.Baseball area protection system and method
US8261503Mar 28, 2008Sep 11, 2012Meyer Donald LFastener element and system for curing concrete
US8291814 *Jan 13, 2009Oct 23, 2012Recia WeigeltMethod of using a protective barbeque mat
US8393055Feb 13, 2004Mar 12, 2013Ted GowerTrack mount for flexible impact resistant enclosure
US8479946 *Apr 17, 2012Jul 9, 2013Matson, Inc.Portable drip containment device apparatus and method
US8505263Dec 26, 2011Aug 13, 2013Ted GowerInflatable barrier
US8523623Dec 16, 2011Sep 3, 2013Kelsyus, LlcCollapsible flotation device
US8657640Nov 28, 2011Feb 25, 2014Kelsyus, LlcCollapsible flotation device
US20100154943 *Feb 25, 2009Jun 24, 20103M Innovative Properties CompanyDrop cloth
US20120312821 *Apr 17, 2012Dec 13, 2012Mark MatsonPortable Drip Containment Device Apparatus and Method
USRE33550 *Apr 19, 1990Mar 12, 1991 Restraint edge for paving members
USRE36775 *Nov 30, 1998Jul 11, 2000Hoheisel; Mark G.Collection tarpaulin
USRE41442 *Mar 28, 1997Jul 20, 2010Industrial & Environmental Concepts, Inc.Insulated removable pond cover
EP1889741A1 *Jul 31, 2007Feb 20, 2008Ivera H.-P. Rück Textilhandel u. -verarbeitung GmbHProtective cover for a vehicle
WO1994023942A1 *May 21, 1993Oct 27, 1994Steven SaylorVinyl garage floor cover
WO1999059452A1Mar 16, 1999Nov 25, 1999Gray Matter Holdings LlcTowel-mat with a frame member and removably attached membranes
WO2001023204A1 *Sep 26, 2000Apr 5, 2001Jeremy HoenackBallistically deployed vehicle and utility covers
WO2002067732A2 *Feb 25, 2002Sep 6, 2002Mastandrea James C JrWeighted blanket
WO2010062324A2 *Oct 27, 2009Jun 3, 2010Hydro Tarp, LlcProtective tarp with plural removable anchor tanks
WO2010080244A1 *Dec 2, 2009Jul 15, 20103M Innovative Properties CompanyDrop cloth
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/83, 383/4, 47/9, 52/3, 52/DIG.130, 5/417, 428/193, 52/23, 150/901, 428/122
International ClassificationE04G21/28
Cooperative ClassificationY10S52/13, E04G21/28, Y10S150/901
European ClassificationE04G21/28
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 10, 1985PAPatent available for license or sale
Aug 13, 1985PAPatent available for license or sale
Jun 11, 1985PAPatent available for license or sale
May 14, 1985PAPatent available for license or sale
Jul 10, 1984PAPatent available for license or sale