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Publication numberUS3863601 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 4, 1975
Filing dateJan 25, 1974
Priority dateJan 25, 1974
Publication numberUS 3863601 A, US 3863601A, US-A-3863601, US3863601 A, US3863601A
InventorsEckart Jr Edmund Albert
Original AssigneeSapolin Paints
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surface masking device for painters
US 3863601 A
Abstract
In the spray painting of houses, a vertical masking element is temporarily attached to a storm sash frame or channel and protects the same and adjacent window pane areas from the paint spray. A right angular horizontal masking element is handheld by the painter and protects horizontal sections of the storm sash frame or channel while allowing freedom of one hand for spray painting of surrounding areas. The masking elements embody reusable body portions of sheet metal or the like and replaceable cardboard extensions applied to the reusable components with adhesive tape. The invention effects a major saving in time compared to prior art systems.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[451 Feb. 4, 1975 SURFACE MASKING DEVICE FOR PAINTERS [75] Inventor: EdmundAlbert Eckart,Jr.,

Westport, Conn.

[73] Assignee: Sapolin Paints, Inc.,New York,

[22] Filed: Jan. 25, 1974 [21] Appl. No.: 436,555

[52] 11.8. C1 118/505, 117/85, 117/38, 118/504 [51] Int. Cl. ..B05c11/16 [58] Field of Search 49/404, 414; 118/504, 505; 117/85, 38; 161/167 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,697,200 1/1929 Morgana et a1 118/505 2,672,122 3/1954 Kupec et a1 118/505 3,743,150 7/1973 Eckart 225/9 OTHER PUBLICATIONS Masks for Precision Painting, pub. in Engineering, pp. 195, 196 and 197, Jan. 28, 1966.

Accessories that help you paint: like a Pro. Good Housekeeping, vol. 166, pp. 161-162, May, 1968.

Primary Examiner-George F. Lesmes Assistant ExaminerR. J. Roche ABSTRACT In the spray painting of houses, a vertical masking element is temporarily attached to a storm sash frame or channel and protects the same and adjacent window pane areas from the paint spray. A right angular horizontal masking element is handheld by the painter and protects horizontal sections of the storm sash frame or channel while allowing freedom of one hand for spray painting of surrounding areas. The masking elements embody reusable body portions of sheet metal or the like and replaceable cardboard extensions applied to the reusable components with adhesive tape. The invention effects a major saving in time compared to prior art systems.

9 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures sum 10F 2 sum .2 or 2 PATENIEB FEB 41975 1 SURFACE MASKING DEVICE FOR PAINTERS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Because of the ever-increasing demand for low cost housing and constantly increasing labor costs, it has become imperative to develop a system which enables the entire exterior of a house or other building to be spray painted. Traditionally. fine houses have always been brush painted in the interest of quality work. More recently, with improved paints and spray apparatus, it has become feasible to spray paint all major areas of the house, such as siding, and to brush paint doors and windows and closely surrounding areas. thus effecting a considerable saving of time and labor compared to traditional methods. One example of the patented prior art pertaining to this problem is US. Pat. No. 3,743,150 issued July 3, 1973. This patent deals with the preparation and application of adhesive-coated paper masking strips having miter cuts to window frames and particularly to covering and protecting the projecting open channels of aluminum storm sash during spray painting operations. The present invention has for its object to improve upon the prior art including the aforementioned patent by the provision of a more simplified covering or shielding device whose use will effect even a greater savings of time and labor. By means of the present invention, the spraying time for a window has been reduced approximately four minutes in comparison to the required time utilizing the system of US. Pat. 3,743,150. In comparison to hand brushing, thirty to forty minutes per window is saved.

The present invention additionally involves indefinitely reusable components formed of metal or plastic and attachment elements of cardboard or the like which can be discarded after a single use economically. Furthermore, a unique arrangement for temporarily adhesively attaching a section of the masking device to a storm window sash is included as an important feature of the invention and this feature adds to the overall efficiency of the system.

Other features and advantages of the invention will appear during the course of the following description.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWING FIGURES FIG. 1 is a front elevation of a window illustrating the use of the masking device embodying the invention.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary elevation showing one lower corner of the window frame without the invention.

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 2 with the invention in place.

FIG. 4 is a similar view showing the invention in use on the interior of the window frame.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary horizontal section taken on line 5-5 of FIG. 6.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary front elevation of the invention adjacent to one upper corner ofa window frame.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION frame 11 is recessed into the wooden frame while the forward channel 13 thereof projects forwardly of the wooden frame 10. As shown, the dual channel aluminum frame 11 receives the inner and outer storm sash l4 and 15 while theusual wooden sash I6 and 17 lie inwardly within the interior of the wooden window frame. the numeral 18 designating interior trim. The chiefpurpose of the invention to be described is to protect the entire aluminum storm sash frame 11 including the flange 12 and the two channels from paint during a spraying operation in which the entire surrounding structure up to and including the exposed portions of the wooden frame 10 may be rapidly spray painted.

Toward this end. the invention comprises a pair of shields or masks I9 and 20 SI'IOWlII in their cntireties during use, FIG. 1, at the upper left hand corner of the window in that figure. The broken line illustration in FIG. 1 indicates the use of the two shields after they have been shifted to mask the upper right handcorner of the window. Similarly, the two portable shields are relocated to protect the lower corners of the window when these regions are being spray painted. The shields 19 and 20 can be produced in various lengths depending upon the sizes of windows being processed and it is thought that two or three standard lengths for the shields should satisfy the needs of all windows.

During use of the invention, as will be fully explained, the vertical shield 19 is temporarily adhesively mounted on the adjacent window structure while the painter manipulates and holds the: second shield 20 in one hand. This leaves the other hand free to hold the spray gun and this method has proven to be the fastest method of painting utilizing the invention.

Continuing to refer to the drawings. each shield 19 and 20 embodies a relatively rigid preferably sheet metal marginal body portion 21 including an exterior flange 22 disposed at an angle of about 15 to the remainder ofthe body portion 21. During use, FIG. 5, the angular flange 22 overlies and protects the aluminum attaching flange 12 of the dual channel aluminum storm sash frame. The body portion 21 of the vertical shield 19 during use is temporarily adhesively attached to the front face of the forward aluminum channel 13 by adhesive tape 23 which is adhesive coated on both sides for attachment to the shield body portion 21 and also to the channel 13, FIGS. 5 and 6. The metal body portion v21 projects somewhat inwardly of the sash frame 11 and carries a relatively wide discardable or replaceable extension panel 24 of cardboard or the like. This extension panel is temporarily attached to the body portion 21 in slightly overlapped relation thereto by external and internal adhesive tape sections 25 and 26 which are preferably coextensive in length with the elements 21 and 24. While the metal body portion 21 can be'used indefinitely, the extension panel 24 of cardboard can be periodically detached and replaced by a fresh section and this can be done following each use of the shield if desired. The double gummed tape section 23 need not extend for "the full length of the body portion 21 but should be sufficiently large to provide firm adherence of the shield 19 to the aluminum channel 13 during use. v

The metal body portions 21 of both shields 19 and 20 are mitered at their opposite ends as shown by the numeral 27 to allow covering or shielding of the entire corner area of the window frame. The cardboard extensions 24 need not be mitered and their square cut ends may simply overlap during usage as depicted in dotted lines in the drawings. Except for possible differences in length where desirable, and the fact that the hand-held shield 20 does not require the mounting tape 23, the two shield sections are identically formed and the above description of one serves to describe both. The purpose of the extensions 24 is of course to protect the adjacent window glass from paint. The extensions 24 can be wider or narrower than shown herein depending upon needs.

FIG. 3 shows the use of the two shields after shifting thereof from their positions in FIG. 1 to facilitate spray painting a lower corner of the window and adjacent areas of siding. By similarly shifting or relocating the two shields, the entire window frame area and surrounding area may be rapidly spray painted. At each relocation of the two shields, one of them, usually the shield 19, is temporarily adhesively attached as described while the other shield, usually the horizontal shield 20, is hand-held. In some cases, this could be reversed and the vertical shield 19 could be hand-held while the horizontal shield 20 is temporarily adhesively supported by a double gummed tape similar to the described tape 23. In still other cases, it may be desirable to temporarily adhesively attach both the vertical and horizontal shields to the work in the described manner during the use of the invention, and this latter mode of use enables the painter to have both hands free during the operation. In any case, it will be seen that the invention is quite versatile as to its usage so as to meet the needs of individual painters and individual jobs.

FIG. 4 illustrates that the invention may also be utilized to protect the interior of a storm sash frame or other window frame or sash during painting. The construction and mode of use of the invention is essentially unchanged whether used externally or internally in relation to a window frame. The invention may be utilized in relation to the storm sash frame 11, FIG. 5, with the storm sash l4 and in place or removed.

It is to be understood that the form of the invention herewith shown and described is to be taken as a preferred example of the same, and that various changes in the shape, size and arrangement of parts may be resorted to, without departing from the spirit of the invention or scope of the subjoined claims.

I claim:

1. A surface masking device for masking selected corners of rectangular window frames including storm window sash channels and adjacent portions of a window pane, said masking device comprising a pair of shields each having at least one complimentary mitercd end, each shield including a marginal body portion and an interior extension panel and having means for attaching said extension panel to said body portion. said masking device having adhesive attaching meanson at least one of said shields enabling said shield to be temporarily attached to a window frame section and self supported thereon during a painting operation.

2. The structure of claim 1, and each shield including a reusable marginal body portion and an interior discardable extension panel temporarily attached to the body portion.

3. The structure of claim 2, and said body portion formed of sheet metal, said extension panel formed of cardboard, and a section of adhesive tape attaching said extension panel releasably to said body portion.

4. The structure of claim 3, and said adhesive tape section comprising exterior and interior adhesive tape sections approximately coextensive lengthwise with said body portion and extension panel and each tape section adhered to both.

5. The structure of claim 1, and said attachment means on one shield comprising a section of adhesive tape having opposite sides thereof gummed for adhesion simultaneously to said shield and to an adjacent window frame portion.

6. The structure of claim 5, and said shield including a sheet metal reusable body portion to which said oppositely gummed tape section is adhered, and a discardable extension panel of cardboard temporarily adhesively attached to said body portion inwardly of said tape section.

7. The structure of claim 6, and said body portion ineluding an exterior flange disposed at a shallow angle to the remainder of the body portion at said extension panel.

8. The structure of claim 7, and said shallow angle being approximately fifteen degrees.

9. The structure of claim 3, and said bodyportion including a part lying in a parallel plane with said extension panel and an external angular flange adapted to project outwardly and inwardly of a storm sash channel to cover and protect a flat exterior mounting flange of the storm sash channel.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1697200 *Apr 4, 1927Jan 1, 1929Briggs Mfg CoPaint shield
US2672122 *Aug 4, 1952Mar 16, 1954Kupec Emil JSurface masking shield for painters
US3743150 *Dec 10, 1971Jul 3, 1973Sapolin PaintsMethod of and apparatus for preparing windows and the like for spray painting
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4235192 *Dec 13, 1979Nov 25, 1980Brubaker Thomas GCorner painting shield
US4559245 *Aug 25, 1983Dec 17, 1985Stark William CPaint shield holder and shielding method
US5368633 *Aug 12, 1993Nov 29, 1994Morrison-Knudson (An Idaho Corporation)Pressurized radioactive gas treatment system
US6793971Dec 3, 2001Sep 21, 2004Cardinal Ig CompanyMethods and devices for manufacturing insulating glass units
US6973759Aug 28, 2001Dec 13, 2005Cardinal Ig CompanyMethods and apparatus for providing information at the point of use for an insulating glass unit
US7025850Mar 31, 2003Apr 11, 2006Cardinal Glass Industries, Inc.Methods and apparatus for masking a workpiece
US7026571Dec 31, 2002Apr 11, 2006Cardinal Ig CompanyGlass masking method using lasers
US7083699Nov 1, 2002Aug 1, 2006Cardinal Ig CompanyMasking glass shapes
US7165591Apr 28, 2003Jan 23, 2007Cardinal Ig CompanyMasking machine
US8015762 *Nov 15, 2007Sep 13, 2011Airbus Operations GmbhWindow element for inserting in a structural part and method of integration of a window element in a structural part
US20030041534 *Aug 26, 2002Mar 6, 2003Paul TrpkovskiRemovable protective covering
US20030087592 *Nov 1, 2002May 8, 2003Paul TrpkovskiMasking glass shapes
US20040031215 *Mar 31, 2003Feb 19, 2004Paul TrpkovskiMethods and apparatus for masking a workpiece
US20040123627 *Dec 31, 2002Jul 1, 2004Cardinal Ig CompanyGlass masking method using lasers
US20050013950 *Aug 13, 2004Jan 20, 2005Cardinal Ig CompanyMethods and devices for manufacturing insulating glass units
US20060045973 *Aug 24, 2004Mar 2, 2006Kerry HannPaint shield
US20060070869 *Oct 4, 2005Apr 6, 2006Krisko Annette JThin film coating and temporary protection technology, insulating glazing units, and associated methods
US20060099025 *Nov 4, 2004May 11, 2006Kerry HannMulti-surface paint roller
US20060127612 *Feb 1, 2006Jun 15, 2006Larsen James EGlass masking method using lasers
US20100043300 *Nov 15, 2007Feb 25, 2010Airbus Deutschland GmbhWindow element for inserting in a structural part and method of integration of a window element in a structural part
WO2003020439A2 *Aug 27, 2002Mar 13, 2003Cardinal Ig CompanyRemovable protective covering
WO2003020439A3 *Aug 27, 2002Aug 21, 2003Cardinal Ig CoRemovable protective covering
Classifications
U.S. Classification118/505, 118/504, 427/282
International ClassificationB05B15/04
Cooperative ClassificationB05B15/0475
European ClassificationB05B15/04G5
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 5, 1981AS07Mortgage
Free format text: AMBASSADOR FACTORS CORPORATION, 1450 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY. 10018 A CORP. OF N * METROPOLITAN GREETINGS, INC. : 19800801
Feb 5, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: AMBASSADOR FACTORS CORPORATION, 1450 BROADWAY, NEW
Free format text: MORTGAGE;ASSIGNOR:METROPOLITAN GREETINGS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:003830/0918
Effective date: 19800801