Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3864153 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 4, 1975
Filing dateJan 26, 1973
Priority dateAug 30, 1969
Publication numberUS 3864153 A, US 3864153A, US-A-3864153, US3864153 A, US3864153A
InventorsSatoru Enomoto
Original AssigneeKureha Chemical Ind Co Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Water resisting and anticorrosive painting method and the painted articles
US 3864153 A
Abstract
A painting method which comprises applying to a substrate an undercoating composition comprising from 10 to 500 parts by weight of an alkylated polycyclic aromatic compound containing no nitrogen, oxygen or sulfur to the extent detectable by elementary analysis and having a mean molecular weight measured by the VPO method of from 250 to 600 and an aromatic ring-forming proton density measured by the nuclear magnetic resonance method of from 35 to 80%, and 100 parts by weight of a urethane resin, said under-coating composition further containing a hardening agent and then applying an over-coating composition comprising a curable resin selected from the group consisting of an epoxy resin, a urethane resin, and an alkyd resin.
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

llnited States Patent Enomoto 1 1 Feb.4,1975

[75] Inventor: Satoru Enomoto, Fukushima, Japan [73] Assignee: Kureha Kagalru Kogyo K.K.,

Tokyo, Japan 22 Filed: .lan.26,1973

211 Appl.No.:326,657

Related 1.1.8. Application Data [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 68,553, Aug. 31,

1970, abandoned.

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Aug. 30, 1969 Japan 44-68350 [52] US. Cl 117/75, 117/72, 117/92, 117/135, 260/336 UB [51] Int. Cl B321) 15/08 [58] Field of Search 117/75, 72, 132 BE, 92,

117/161 KP, 132 B, 135; 260/336 EP, 33.6 UB

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,864,722 12/1958 Millar et a1. 117/72 2,906,720 9/1959 Simpson 117/132 BE X 3,062,771 11/1962 Boenau et a1 [17/132 BE X 3,284,400 11/1966 Nelson et a1. 260/336 EP 3,352,955 ll/1967 Pigott et a1 117/75 3,390,119 6/1968 Alexander et a1 260/18 TN X 3,625,742 12/1971 Baldwin 117/75 Primary Examiner-Ralph l-lusack Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Sughrue, Rothwell, Mion, Zinn & Macpeak [57] ABSTRACT A painting method which comprises applying to a sub strate an undercoating composition comprising from 10 to 500 parts by weight of an alkylated polycyclic aromatic compound containing no nitrogen, oxygen or sulfur to the extent detectable by elementary analysis and having a mean molecular weight measured by the VP0 method of from 250 to 600 and an aromatic ring-forming proton density measured by the nuclear magnetic resonance method of from 35 to 80%, and 100 parts by weight of a urethane resin, said undercoating composition further containing a hardening agent and then applying an over-coating composition comprising a curable resin selected from the group consisting of an epoxy resin, a urethane resin, and an alkyd resin.

7 Claims, No Drawings WATER RESISTING AND ANTICORROSRVE PAINTING METHOD AND THE PAINTED ARTICLES CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION The present application is a continuation-in-part of co-pending application Ser. No. 68,553, filed Aug. 3 1. I970, now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates to a method of applying water-resisting and anticorrosive paint to a substrate and, more particularly, the present invention relates to a painting method comprising applying to the substrate an undercoating composition comprising a mixture of an alkylated polycyclic aromatic compound and a curable resin and then applying an over-coating composition comprising a curable resin.

2. Description of the Prior Art Coal tars which have hitherto been used as paint materials have sufficient water resisting and anticorrosive properties and may be satisfactory from this point of view but, in practical use, they encounter various difficulties. That is, they have such faults that the color thereof is black, the quality is not constant, they readily cause bleeding thus making over-coating impossible, etc. Therefore, although coal tars have excellent waterresistance and corrosion-resistance properties, their use is limited to a narrow range.

On the other hand, since petroleum asphalts have an inferior compatibility with resins as compared with coal tars, they are not usually used.

Therefore, an object of this invention is to provide a method for applying a novel paint composition that can overcome the aforesaid difficulties without losing the specific merits of coal tars.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present inventor has discovered that by applying to a substrate a mixture of 10 to 500 parts by weight of an alkylated polycyclic aromatic compound and 100 parts by weight of a curable resin, such as a urethane resin as an under-coating material and then applying an over-coating composition containing, as a curable resin, a resin such as an epoxy resin, a urethane resin, or an alkyd resin, a thick paint coating having excellent water resistance and corrosion resistance can be obtained without being accompanied by the undesirable formations of bleeding and other similar disadvantages.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The alkylated polycyclic aromatic compounds having the excellent properties as mentioned above are those compounds in which no oxygen, sulfur or nitrogen is detected by an elementary analysis, and which do no emit, therefore, and offensive odors, and which show a neutral property. Also, it is preferable for the purposes of this invention that the alkylated polycyclic aromatic compounds have a mean molecular weight of from 250 to 600 measured by the VP method (i.e., a vapor pressureosmotic pressure method), If the mean molecular weight is less than the disclosed range, the viscosity of the aromatic compound is lowered and the volatility thereof is increased, which makes the use of such alkylated polycyclic aromatics undesirable for paint compositions.

On the other hand, if the mean molecular weight of the aromatics is greater than the above range, solidification of the alkylated aromatics occurs due to the increase in the softening point, which is undesirable in operation.

Moreover, it is also desirable that the alkylated polycyclic aromatic compounds have an aromatic ringforming proton density measured by nuclear magnetic resonance of 35 to (the 1' value of tetramethyl silane is defined to be l0 as the standard and a 1' value of less than 4 represents the aromatic proton). An aromatic ring forming proton density of less than 35% means that the alkylated polycyclic aromatics have long alkyl groups or an increased number of naphthenic rings, which results in reducing the compatibility of the aromatic compounds with the curable resin.

On the other hand, if the aromatic ring forming proton density is higher than 80%, a solidification phenomenon occurs due to the increase of aromaticity.

Furthermore, the general properties of the alkylated polycyclic aromatic compounds used in this invention are as follows: a specific gravity of 0.95 to l.l0, and (if liquid) a viscosity of higher than 2,000 c.p.s. (at 25 C), or (if solid) a softening point of about 25 C.

The alkylated polycyclic aromatic compounds of this invention are derived from, for example, residual oils obtained in the thermal cracking of petroleum fractions at temperatures of higher than 900 C. Typical of such residual oils are a bottom oil obtained from the production of ethylene by the decomposition of a light oil or the residual oil obtained from the production of ethylene and acetylene by the decomposition of petroleum. See, for example, Hydrocarbon Processing," November, I969.

To obtain the alkylated aromatics of this invention, the abovedescribed residual oil is first subjected to a conventional hydrodesulfurization treatment. The product is then alkylated and finally, low boiling fractions boiling at less than 380 C are removed from the alkylated product to provide the alkylated polycyclic aromatic compounds of this invention.

Any conventional hydrodesulfurization process can be employed and the process can be conducted in one or two steps. Similarly, any conventional alkylation process is operable. Typical examples of operable hydrodesulfurization and alkylation techniques are as follows:

Conditions of a Typical Hydrodesulfurization Treatment Temperature (C) 40 to 450 Pressure (kg/cm) 5 to 300 H """/Fracti l 3 to l5 LHSV (liquid hourly space velocity) Catalyst:

0.2 to l0 One or more metals or sulfides of tungsten, molybdenum, nickel, cobalt, etc, on a carrier such as alumina, diatomaceous earth, etc.

Conditions of a Typical Alkylation Treatment phosphoric acid, etc.

Generally, the alkylation is conducted using a lower olefin such as an ethylene, propylene, or butylene in the presence of an acid catalyst such as silica-alumina gel, etc.

Generally, the viscosity of the alkylated polycyclic aromatic compounds can be varied at will by controlling, inter alia, the molecular weight of the raw material (i.e., the residual oils) and the degree of alkylation. Specifically, as the molecular weight of the raw material becomes lower, the viscosity becomes lower. The residual oils generally have a high viscosity and are near-solids but by alkylating such oils, the viscosity will decrease. Continuing the alkylation (i.e., adding more alkyl groups) beyond a certain point will result in further increases in the viscosity.

Therefore, one may produce alkylated polycyclic aromatic compounds of the above type having any viscosity above 2000 cps at 25 C by considering the above factors.

According to the present invention, an under-coating composition is applied using a mixture of to 500 parts by weight of the above-mentioned alkylated polycyclic aromatic compounds and 100 parts by weight of a urethane resin, the mixture further containing a hardening agent for the resin and, if necessary, a filler and a solvent; and, then, an over-coating composition is applied using a coating composition containing, as the vehicle, a curable resin such as an epoxy resin, a urethane resin, or an alkyd resin.

The painting method of this invention has the advantages that the period of time between the under-coating and the over-coating can be greatly shortened as compared with conventional painting methods and no stripping of the coated layers occurs when completed. Also, when the painted articles are subjected to a long weathering test, no bleeding-out phenomenon occurs, and when a titanium white-containing paint is applied to the over-coat, no discoloring occurs. Also, the water resistance and the corrosion resistance of the layers thusa painted are the same as, or superior to, those layers obtained using a coal tar-blended paint.

Thus, the painting method of this invention overcomes the abovementioned disadvantages of conventional coal tar-blended paints, the coloring range of the paint is greatly enlarged, and further, the most inexpensive alkyd paint among the various baking paints can be used for the over-coating.

The preferred substrate is metal, most preferably iron or steel.

The following examples illustrate several embodiments of the production of the raw materials for the paint used in the method of this invention and several embodiments of the painting method of this invention.

MANUFACTURED EXAMPLE 1 A crude oil from North Sumatra was sprayed into a high temperature steam at 2,000 C to cause the pyrolysis thereof and from the tarry materials thus obtained were recovered fractions having boiling points of 250 to 450 C. These fractions were introduced in a reactor containing a cobalt-molybdenum-alumina type desulfurization catalyst together with hydrogen under a pressure of 35 kg/cm a temperature of 410 C, a LHSV of 0.5, and a molar ratio of hydrogen to the fraction of 6 to remove impurities from the fractions. Then, the fractions thus refined were alkylated by introducing them into a reactor containing a silica-alumina catalyst together with ethylene in an ethylene/fractions molar ratio of 10 under the following conditions: a pressure of 40 kg/cm, :1 LHSV of0.5, and a temperature of 300 C. Thereafter, by distilling the alkylation product, the

following two components A and B were obtained. The

properties thereof are also shown below.

Component A Component 8 Temperature of removing low boiling matter 380C 430C Specific gravity 1.10 1.20

Viscosity (cps)(at 25C) l20,000 42,000

Volatile matter ("/11 0 0 Molecular weight (VPO) 310 460 Aromatic ring-forming proton density (NMR) 367! 50% Elementary analysis N l none none 0 MANUFACTURED EXAMPLE 2 The fractions recovered from the tarry materials as in Example 1 were introduced in a reactor containing a cobalt-molybdenum-alumina type desulfurization catalyst together with hydrogen under a pressure of 35 Kg/cm a temperature of 350 C, a LHSV of 0.5, and a molar ratio of hydrogen to the fraction of 5 to remove impurities from the fractions. Then, the fractions thus refined were alkylated by introducing them into a reactor containing a silica-alumina catalyst together with propylene in a propylene/fractions molar ratio of 3.0 under the following conditions: a pressure of 20 Kg/cm, a LHSV of 0.5, and a temperature of 200 C. Thereafter, by distilling the alkylation product, the following component C was obtained. The properties thereof are also shown below.

Component C Temperature of removing low boiling matter 380C Specific gravity 0.99

Viscosity (cps) (at 25 C) 10,000

Volatile matter (/z) 0 MANUFACTURED EXAMPLE 3 A bottom oil formed during the production of ethylene by an outer heating-type steam decomposition of naphtha was recovered. The bottom oil was subjected to the desulfurization as in Example 1 and then a part of the bottom oil thus desulfurized was alkylated with ethylene as in Example 1 and then distilled to remove low boiling matters of lower than 400 C to provide Component D. The properties of this component are shown below.

Component D S ecil'ie ravitv L08 I p g prepared by mixing the above-mentioned components Viscosity (CPS! (at 35Cl 14mm) 5 using each ofthe components A, B, C and D prepared Volatile matter W) o in the above examples as the alkylated polycyclic aromatics and applied to an iron plate to a thickness of Welsh 800-] .000 microns. After drying the coating for 1 day Aromatic-forming proton at normal temperature, the over-coating COmpOStttOtt (NMR) described above was applied to the under-coat thus Elementary analysis' formed to a thickness of 50 microns. The excellent re- N and 0 sults obtained by the method of this invention are shown in the following table.

Water Light Weathering (4) Impact Aromatic Over resis- Fast- Resis- Bending resis- Component Coat tancet l) ness(2) tance(3) Strength tanee(5) Bleedingtoi A Urethane Resin 1 kg- Compono no no 50cm sition change change change passed passed none B do. do. do. do. do. do. do.

D do. do. do. do. do. do. do.

C do. do. do. do. do. do. do.

A Alkyd resin Composition do. do. do. do. do. do. do. do. do. do. do. do. do.

do. do. do. do. do. do. do.

C do. do. do. do. do. do. do.

(llWater resistance (immersed in distilled water for 3 months 41140 C); (ZlLight Fastncss (light exposed for 200 hours by means of a fade-wmeterl; (JlWeathering resistance tallowed to stand outdoors for (a months); (4JBending strength (an inch. mandrel test); (illmpact resistance (Du Pom-type test); and (filBlceding (observed after allowing to stand for (i months).

EXAMPLE 4 What is claimed is:

This example describes the use of a paint composition containing a urethane resin and the alkylated polycyclic aromatic compounds of Examples l, 2 and 3.

Under-coating composition Urethane resin. Olestcr No. 1066 (trade name. made by Mitsui Toatsu Kagaku K.K.)

Alkylated polycyclic aromatic compound (described below) Colonate L (Trade Name) O\'ercoating composition 1. Urethane resin composition:

Urethane resin Olester No. 1066 Titanium white Colonate L Alkyd resin composition:

Alkyd resin (Phthalkyd 3657()) Titanium white parts by weight 50 parts by weight parts by weight 25 parts by weight 25 parts by weight parts by weight I00 parts by weight 40 parts by weight Chemical Co., Japan, and is a prepolymer of tristyrolpropane and toluene diisocyanate.

The coating composition for the under-coating was 1. A coated article having excellent water-resistance and corrosion-resistance and which is non-bleeding comprising:

1. a substrate;

2. a first layer coated directly on said substrate consisting essentially of 10 to 500 parts by weight of an alkylated polycyclic aromatic compound and 100 parts by weight of a urethane resin, said alkylated polycyclic aromatic compound containing no nitrogen, oxygen or sulfur to the extent detectable by elementary analysis, having a means molecular weight measured by VPO method of from 250 to 600, having an aromatic ring-forming proton den sity measured by the nuclear magnetic resonance method of from 35 to having a specific gravity of from 0.95 to 1.10, and, if liquid, having a viscosity of at least 2,000 eentipoises at 25 C or, if solid, having a softening point of about 25 C; said first layer further consisting essentially ofa hardening agent for the urethane resin; and

3. a second layer coated directly on said first layer consisting essentially of a curable resin selected from the group consisting of an epoxy, a urethane resin and an alkyd resin.

2. A method of coating a substrate to provide said substrate with excellent water-resistance and excellent corrosion-resistance and to make said substrate nonbleeding comprising:

1. applying to said substrate an undercoating composition consisting essentially of 10 to 500 parts by weight of an alkylated polycyclic aromatic compound, 100 parts by weight of a urethane resin and a hardening agent for the urethane resin. said alkylated polycyclic aromatic compound containing no nitrogen, oxygen or sulfur to the extent detectable by elementary analysis, having a mean molecular weight measured by the VP0 method of from 250 to 600, having an aromatic ring-forming proton density measured by the nuclear magnetic resonance method of from 35 to 80%, having a specific gravity of from 0.95 to 1.10, having a viscosity of at least 2,000 centipoises at C and having a softening point of about 25 C; and

2. applying to the undercoated substrate an overcoating composition consisting essentially of a curable resin selected from the group consisting of an epoxy resin, a urethane resin and an alkyd resin.

3. The method of claim 2 wherein said alkylated polycyclic aromatic compound is obtained by hydrodesulfurizing and alkylating a residual oil obtained in the thermal cracking of petroleum fractions at temperatures higher than 900 C and subsequently removing low boiling fractions from the resulting product.

4. The method of claim 3 wherein said alkylation step is conducted with a lower olefin selected from the group consisting of ethylene. propylene and butylene.

5. The method of claim 2 wherein said substrate comprises steel.

6. The method of claim 2 wherein the undercoating composition is dried before said overcoating composition is applied thereto.

7. The method of claim 2 wherein said uncoating composition further consists essentially of a filler and

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2864722 *Mar 1, 1955Dec 16, 1958Glidden CoPlural coating with epoxy primer and alkyd-silicone topcoat
US2906720 *Apr 24, 1957Sep 29, 1959Shell DevComposition comprising aromatic petroleum residue and polyepoxide and process for treating surfaces therewith
US3062771 *Oct 8, 1958Nov 6, 1962Socony Mobil Oil Co IncCompositions of epoxy resin and aromatic hydrocarbon oils
US3284400 *Apr 5, 1963Nov 8, 1966Shell Oil CoProcess for preparing improved oil-extended polyepoxide compositions and resulting products
US3352955 *Mar 5, 1962Nov 14, 1967Mobay Chemical CorpProcess of bonding a polyurethane resin to a metal surface having a cured epoxy resin coating
US3390119 *Dec 4, 1963Jun 25, 1968Monsanto CoHydrocarbon oil-urethane compositions
US3625742 *May 22, 1968Dec 7, 1971Goodyear Tire & RubberDimethyl formamide soluble polyurethane bonded to metal using an epoxy-polyamide primer
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4137349 *Dec 20, 1976Jan 30, 1979Dai Nippon Toryo Co., Ltd.Process for forming multi-layer coatings
US4241682 *Oct 7, 1974Dec 30, 1980Milton K. RubinSolutions of polyethylenimine or a hydrophilic derivative thereof and a hydrophilic acrylic polymer and watercraft coated below the waterline therewith
US4268542 *Jan 25, 1979May 19, 1981Dai Nippon Toryo Co., Ltd.Process for forming multi-layer coatings
US4393120 *Aug 18, 1981Jul 12, 1983Yuken Industry Co., Ltd.Plastic coated with golden evaporated film
US4421827 *Jan 18, 1982Dec 20, 1983Scott Bader Company LimitedComposites and methods for providing metal clad articles and articles produced
USRE31960 *Oct 5, 1984Jul 30, 1985Scott Bader Company LimitedComposites and methods for providing metal clad articles and articles produced
CN101831138BMay 22, 2009May 18, 2011陈维伟Quick drying hand inkpad for hand model
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/413, 428/461, 427/409, 428/423.3, 428/423.7, 427/386, 428/425.8, 524/499
International ClassificationC09D175/04, B05D7/26
Cooperative ClassificationB05D7/26, C09D175/04
European ClassificationB05D7/26, C09D175/04