Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3865374 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 11, 1975
Filing dateJan 22, 1974
Priority dateJan 22, 1974
Publication numberUS 3865374 A, US 3865374A, US-A-3865374, US3865374 A, US3865374A
InventorsTroncoso Jr Fernando
Original AssigneeTroncoso Jr Fernando
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Arrow locating device
US 3865374 A
Abstract
An improved arrow locating device comprises a relatively thin, flat, stretchable, unitary flexible strip of extended surface area with wings projecting outwardly from a preferably approximately central aperture. The aperture is adapted to be stretched around the nock or shaft of an arrow to releasably lock the device in place rearward of the arrow vanes. When locked in place, the wings slope rearwardly from the main plane of the aperture. Preferably, the strip is colored. It is easily viewed at a distance. Moreover, the wings act to stablize the arrow in flight.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Troncoso, Jr.

1451 Feb. 11, 1975 1 ARROW LOCATING DEVICE [21] Appl. No.: 435,516

[52] [1.5. CI. 273/106.5 R, 40/2 R, 273/1065 C [51] Int. Cl. F41b 5/02 [58] Field of Search 273/106.5 C, 106.5 R; 40/2 R, 21 R, 21 B, 20; 161/22-30 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,095,195 10/1937 MacDonald 40/2 R 2,553,953 5/1951 Arkinstall 40/2 R V 2,887,319 5/1959 Lay 273/1065 C 3,161,559 12/1964 Tong 1 161/28 UX 3,231,992 2/1966 Swett 40/21 R 3,428,321 2/1969 Manning 273/1065 C FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 798,175 7/1958 Great Britain 161/30 5/1901 Great Britain 273/1065 c OTHER PUBLICATIONS Archery Magazine, 12-1970, p. 43, Sweetland Archery Products-Fur Tracers Primary Examiner-Paul E. Shapiro Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Donald E. Nist {57] ABSTRACT An improved arrow locating device comprises a relatively thin, flat, stretchable, unitary flexible strip of extended surface area with wings projecting outwardly from a preferably approximately central aperture. The aperture is adapted to be stretched around the neck or shaft of an arrow to releasably lock the device in place rearward of the arrow vanes. When locked in place, the wings slope rearwardly from the main plane of the aperture. Preferably, the strip is colored. It is easily viewed at a distance. Moreover, the wings act to stablize the arrow in flight.

7 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures 1 ARROW LOCATING DEVICE BACKGROUND 1. Field of the Invention The present invention generally relates to arrow locating devices and more particularly to a visual locating device and stabilizer releasably attached to the arrow.

2. Prior Art Arrows are diffucult to spot in the target at any reasonable distance, for example at 20 yards indoors, even with good lighting conditions. In outdoor target archery it is permissable for the archer to use optical spotting devices such as binoculars, telescopes, etc. However, in many indoor and outdoor field tournaments, such devices cannot be used on the shooting line. Accordingly, the archer in such tournaments encounters considerable difficulty in determining where his arrows are in the target and thus how to adjust his sights to correct for inaccuracies.

Arrows are difficult to locate in targets because only the nock or string-receiving end is facing the archer. The nock is very small, as are the vanes (feathers, plastic, rubber, etc.) on most modern arrows (for maximum arrow speed). Even with optical aid, the archer frequently cannot be sure which arrows are his on a target being shoot at by a group of archers. Many archery events require a given number of arrows to be shot by the archer within a time limit. Accordingly, when time is wasted using optical sighting aids, less time is available to concentrate on accurate arrow shooting.

Brightly colored nocks are now in use to help the archer spot his arrows, but are inadequate for such purposes in most cases. In a few instances, some archers, particularly when indoors at short range where arrow speed is of slightly less importance for accuracy, have used pom-pom type attachments made of a bundle of feathers or the like fluffy material and sometimes termed floo-floos or flu-flus, in order to help spot the arrows. Such attachments cannot be used outdoors because of severe wind drag, and even indoors have several disadvantages. Thus, they not only decrease arrow speed, but are expensive and are easily damaged by arrows striking them, are difficult to attach to the arrow and replace and are inconvenient to carry on the arrows in the arrow quiver because of their considerable bulk. Moreover, when a group of arrows bearing such attachments are closely grouped in the target, as frequently happens in indoor shooting, such attachments obscure the true position of each arrow in the target and thus defeat their primary purpose.

Accordingly, there is a need for an inexpensive, durable easily attachable and replaceable visual arrow locating device which will accurately locate each arrow in the target and not materially increase arrow drag, so that it can be used with good results indoors and outdoors.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention satisfies the foregoing needs. It is substantially as set forth in the abstract above. Thus, the improved arrow locating device comprises a thin flat unitary strip of flexible, stretchable,durable material. The strip includes a plurality of wings projecting outwardly from a preferably generally central stretchable aperture. When the nock and/or shaft of an arrow are passed through the aperture, the latter is stretched, deforming the strip so that the wings slope generally symmetrically away from the main plane of the aperture. The device is placed on the rear end of the arrow so that the wing slope is rearward from the arrow vanes, thus minimizing wind drag and permitting the wings to function as arrow stabilizers as well as the means by which the arrows are easily spotted in the target at a distance. Further features of the invention are set forth in the following detailed description and accompanying drawings.

DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a schematic top plan view of a first preferred embodiment of the improved arrow locating device of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a schematic side elevation of the device of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a schematic perspective view of the device of FIG. 1 as initially positioned on an arrow;

FIG. 4 is a schematic perspective view of the device of FIG. 1 in its operative (final) position on an arrow;

FIG. 5 is a schematic top plan view of a second preferred embodiment of the device of the present invention;

FIG. 6 is a schematic top plan view of a third preferred embodiment of the device of the present invention; and,

FIG. 7 is a schematic top plan view of a fourth preferred embodiment of the device of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION FIGS. 1 4.

A first preferred embodiment of the device of the invention is shown schematically in FIGS. 1 4. Thus, a device 10 is shown which comprises a flexible, resilient, tough, thin, flat, stretchable strip 12. Strip 12 is elongated so as to include a pair of wings 14 on opposite sides of a central aperture 16 extending through strip 12.

Strip 12 can be fabricated of any suitable material having the characteristics specified above. For example, one preferred material can comprise polyurethane elastomer or elastomeric plastic. Another such material may comprise certain grades of polyethylene plastic, silicone rubber, natural rubber or polybutadiene rub ber, as well as other plastics, rubbers, stretchable cloth and the like. Strip 12 is usually colored black or a fluorescent-color for easy viewing and can be relatively small, for example, 1 1/16 inch X 5/16 inch or the like, and about 1/64 inch 1/32 inch thick. Other sizes, shapes and thicknesses are also suitable.

Aperture 16in strip 12 can be of any suitable size and shape. Preferably, it is circular and it is smaller in diameter than the nock and arrow shaft to which it is to be attached. Thus, for example, the aperture can be oneeighth inch in diameter when the strip 12 is to be used on, for example, a one-fourth inch diameter arrow shaft having a nock slightly larger than one-fourth inch in diameter. A typical shaft diameter relative to aperture 16 is shown in dotted outline in FIG. 1. It will be understood that because aperture 16 is greatly expandable it can be made to fit over a wide variety of sizes of arrow shafts and nocks. Thus, strip 12 can be made essentially universally adaptable.

When it is desired to use device 10, strip 12 is grasped at Wings 12 by the thumb and forefinger of each hand and aperture 16 is pulled down over the nock 18 (FIGS. 3 & 4) of the arrow 20 until the juncture 22 between nock l8 and arrow shaft 24 is reached.

Since nock 18 is larger in diameter than shaft 24, a retaining ridge is formed therebetween at juncture 22, aiding in holding strip 12 in place. Due to the expansion of aperture 16, strip 12 is deformed so that wings 14 generally symmetrically slope away from the main plane of aperture 16 and towards the rear end of feathers 26 (FIG. 3). Wings 14 are then pulled back to their operative position, i.e., towards the rear end of arrow 20 so that they slope rearwardly from arrow 20, as shown in FIG. 4. This can be done while maintaining aperture 16 at juncture 22. Device 10 is now fully installed, ready for use. If desired, device 10 can be rtated until wings 14 extend in a position of maximum flight stabilization, i.e., in the spaces between feathers (vanes) 26.

Wings 14 do not in any way interfere with carrying, loading and shooting of arrow 20, and are easily viewable in the target when arrow 20 is shot into the target. Vanes 14 are sufficiently small so that they do not obscure the view of the arrows. Moreover, the rearward slope of vanes 14 minimizes arrow drag during flight. Since vanes 14 are flexible, if they are struck by another arrow entering the target, they recover without any damage and without any arrow deflection. They and the rest of strip 12 are held firmly in place due to the gripping effect of strip 12 around shaft 24 at juncture 22. Yet strip 12 can be easily removed merely by pulling it rearwardly over juncture 22 and nock 18 and thus from arrow 20. The installation (and removal) of strip 12 takes only a few seconds, and can be done in the field and on the shooting line, since no adhesives, special tools, etc. are needed.

FIGS. 7.

Further embodiments of the arrow locating device of the invention are schematically shown in FIGS. 5 7. Each is substantially the same as device except in size and shape. Each contains wings and a central aperture and each is thin, flat, unitary, flexible, durable and stretchable, has the advantages, and is used in a manner identical to that of device 10. Each can be fabricated of material similar to that of device 10. FIG. 5 shows device 40 which differs from device 10 only in that it has four spaced wings 42. FIG. 6 shows a device 60 having three spaced wings 62 at 120 from each other and is primarily for use with three-fletched arrows. FIG. 7 shows a pinwheel or star-shaped device bearing eight spaced vanes 82 radiating from a generally circular configuration. It is a multi-purpose design.

Various modifications can be made in the arrow locating device of the present invention and in its components. All such modifications as are within the scope of the appended claims form part of the present invention.

What is claimed is:

1. An improved arrow locating device, said device comprising, in combination:

a. an archery arrow having i. an elongated tubular shaft;

ii. a plurality of spaced flight vanes disposed adjacent the rear end of said shaft, and,

iii. an arrow nock secured over said rear end; and,

b. a Iocater comprising a relatively thin, stretchable unitary flexible strip of extended surface area, said strip including a plurality of wings projecting outwardly from a central portion defining an aperture therein, said central portion being uninterrupted except for said aperture, the diameter of said aperature being less than the external diameter of said shaft said shaft being disposed through said aperture rearward of said vanes, whereby said aperture is stretched, thereby releasably holding said strip in place with said wings sloping rearwardly from said aperture for essentially dragless arrow flight.

2. The improved locating device of claim 1 wherein said strip comprises deformable plastic and wherein said wings slope generally symmetrically.

3. The improved locating device of claim 2 wherein said strip comprises polyurethane elastomeric plastic.

4. The improved locating device of claim 1 wherein said strip is generally elongated, wherein said wings are colored and comprise a pair and wherein said aperture is centrally disposed.

5. The improved locating device of claim 4 wherein said strip comprises deformable plastic.

6. The improved locating device of claim 5 wherein said strip comprises polyurethane elastomeric plastic.

7. The improved locating device of claim 1 wherein said strip is generally circular and wherein said wings project radially outwardly from said aperture.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2095195 *Aug 21, 1935Oct 5, 1937Macdonald Murray ALabel
US2553953 *Aug 6, 1949May 22, 1951Arkinstall George RFlower collar
US2887319 *Sep 30, 1953May 19, 1959Nat Lay IncArrow fletchings
US3161559 *Jul 25, 1961Dec 15, 1964Duncan TongStem mounting for artificial flowers
US3231992 *Oct 4, 1962Feb 1, 1966Kimball Systems IncParcel identification device
US3428321 *Jan 13, 1967Feb 18, 1969William E SweetlandFur fletched arrows
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4234192 *Sep 19, 1979Nov 18, 1980Salamone Joseph LBi-delta vane
US4846481 *Jul 22, 1988Jul 11, 1989Wageman Arthur RString attaching device for arrows
US5251907 *Aug 14, 1992Oct 12, 1993Ady Daniel DSonic archery beacon
US5443272 *Nov 22, 1993Aug 22, 1995Vincent, Sr.; Richard G.Method and apparatus for covering arrow shafts
US6764420 *Mar 12, 2002Jul 20, 2004Talon Industries, LlcDetachable nock for detaching a locator from an arrow
US6814678 *Sep 5, 2003Nov 9, 2004Talon Industries, LlcDevice for detaching locator from arrow for tracking game
US6866599Jan 14, 2003Mar 15, 2005The Game Tracker, Inc.Reinforced arrow shaft including integral fabric sleeve, and arrow which is produced therewith
US7201818Nov 5, 2003Apr 10, 2007Eastman Holding CompanyMethod of making arrow shaft including integral sleeve, and arrow shaft which is produced thereby
US7485057Feb 17, 2005Feb 3, 2009Abbas Ben AfshariArrow fletching assembly
US7608002Aug 31, 2006Oct 27, 2009Eastman Holding CompanyComposite arrow shaft including two-part reinforcing sleeve, method of making same, and front-loaded arrow which is produced therewith
US7909714Aug 15, 2007Mar 22, 2011Maurice CyrRear mounted penetration limiter for bow-fired projectiles
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/578
International ClassificationF42B6/06, F42B6/00
Cooperative ClassificationF42B6/06
European ClassificationF42B6/06