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Publication numberUS3865377 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 11, 1975
Filing dateApr 30, 1973
Priority dateApr 30, 1973
Also published asCA1002981A1
Publication numberUS 3865377 A, US 3865377A, US-A-3865377, US3865377 A, US3865377A
InventorsCooper Julius, Reinertsen Tormod K
Original AssigneeIdeal Toy Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shuffleboard type game
US 3865377 A
Abstract
A shuffleboard type game has a relatively flat playing surface along which a plurality of pucks can be slid from a first to a second or scoring end portion. The playing surface has a plurality of pairs of apertures formed in the scoring end portion thereof, with one of the apertures in each pair being a scoring aperture and the other being a puck ejecting aperture. Independent scoring means are respectivley associated with each of the pairs of apertures for supporting a puck in the scoring aperture and for ejecting the puck in the scoring aperture when another puck is placed in the ejecting aperture of the pair.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Cooper et al.

SHUFFLEBOARD TYPE GAME Inventors: Julius Cooper, New Hyde Park;

Tormod K. Reinertsen, East Northport, both of N.Y.

Assignee: Ideal Toy Corporation, Hollis, N.Y.

Filed: Apr. 30, 1973 Appl. No.: 355,859

US. Cl...... 273/126 R, 273/119 R, 273/123 R, 273/l27 D Int. Cl A63b 67/14 Field of Search 273/118 R, 118 A, US D, 273/ll9 R, 119 A, 121 R, l2l A, 121 D, 121 E, 122 R, 122 A, I23 R, 123 A, 124 R, I24 A, 125 R, 125 A, 126 R, 126 A, 127 R, 127 D, 129

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS [451 Feb. 11, 1975 2,317,506 4/1943 Williams et al. 273/123 A 3,090,622 4/1963 Sire 273/l26 A FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 447,36l l0/l9l2 France 273/l2l R Primary ExaminerAnton O. Oechsle Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Richard M. Rabkin ABSTRACT A shuffleboard type game has a relatively flat playing surface along which a plurality of pucks can be slid from a first to a second or scoring end portion. The playing surface has a plurality of pairs of apertures formed in the scoring end portion thereof, with one of the apertures in each pair being a scoring aperture and the other being a puck ejecting aperture. Independent scoring means are respectivley associated with each of the pairs of apertures for supporting a puck in the scoring aperture and for ejecting the puck in the scoring aperture when another puck is placed in the ejecting aperture of the pair.

22 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures PATENTED FEB] 1 I975 sum 2 0F 3 SHUFFLEBOARD TYPE GAME The present invention relates to a shuffleboard type game, and more particularly to a game in which pucks in a scoring position in the game can be displaced by an opponent through proper'placement of his pucks.

The shuffleboard type game of the present invention is formed with a relatively flat playing surface along which two or more players can slide individual pucks to attempt to place their pucks in predetermined scoring locations along the playing-surface. These scoring locations are determined by a series of apertures formed in the playing surface at one end of the game. Each scoring aperture has-an'associated puck ejecting aperture formed adjacent to it and an associated scoring mechanism which permits the players to play the game by the use of both offensive and defensive strategy. More specifically, each of the scoring mechanisms includes a support platform located below the playing surface beneath its associated scoring aperture so that a puck projected along the playing surface, towards the scoring area, can enter one of the scoring apertures and be supported therein by the support platform. In addition, each scoring mechanism includes a lever mounted below the support platformandhaving opposedends.

respectively associated with the scoring and ejecting apertures of its associatedpair of apertures. The lever is normally biased into a position so that one end thereof is below and adjacent the ejecting aperture while the opposite end thereof is below and remote from the scoring aperture. By this arrangement an opponent can attempt to project a puck into the ejecting aperture associated with a scoring aperture that contains a puck representing'a score. If this puck enters the ejecting aperture it causes the lever mechanism to pivot, thereby moving the other end portion of the lever towards the puck support platform below the scoring aperture. That platform has an opening'therein through which a displacement pin on the lever enters, during this pivotal movement, to engage and urge the puck supported on the platform off of the platform to a position below the playing surface. In this manner, a player can remove his opponents puck from a scoring position. Thus, the game players not only can attempt to make their own scores in order to win the game, but also can play to remove the scores of their opponents.

In accordancewith one embodiment of the invention the playing surface is provided with a resilient peripheral wall and deflecting wall located between the end portions of the playing. surface and positioned to prevent direct movement of a puck from the first end thereof into one of the scoring apertures. The deflecting member is constructed and positioned so that the players do not have a direct or straight. path along which to direct their pucks into any of one of the apertures. Thus, the players are required to deflect or bank their pucks against the resilient wall means before the puck can enter either the scoring apertures or the ejecting apertures. This increases the need for skill in projecting the pucks towards the acoring end of the playing surface and makes the play of the game more challenging.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a shuffleboard type game which can be played both offensively and defensively.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a game which is relatively simple in construction and yet durable in use.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a shuffleboard type game which is relatively inexpensive to manufacture and yet provides a challenge to the players.

The above, and other objects, features and advantages of this invention will become apparent in the following detailed description of an-illustrative embodiment thereof which is to be read in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a game constructed in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged sectional view of a puck projecting mechanism used in one embodiment of the invention and taken along line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged sectional view of the puck scoring and ejecting mechanism;

FIG. 5 is a plan view of the ejecting lever taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a plan view of another embodiment of a puck scoring and ejecting mechanism adapted to be used with the present invention; and

FIG. 7' is a sectional view taken along line 7-7 of FIG. 6.

Referring now to the drawing in detail and initially to FIG. 1. thereof it will be seen that the shuffleboard type game 101 of the present invention includes a playing board l'2-having a relatively flat playing surface 14 along which a plurality of pucks 16 are moved during the play ofthe game. Playing surface 14 includes a first end 18 from which pucks 16 are projected, by a projecting mechanism 20, along surface 14 towards a scoring end portion 22. The latter includes a plurality of pairs of apertures 24, each of which includes a scoring aperture 26 and a puck ejecting aperture 28;

In the play of the game the players sequentially project their pucks 16, which may be provided in sets of different colors, along the playing surface in an attempt to place their respective pucks in the scoring apertures 26. In addition to attempting to score points by proper placement of their pucks, the players can attempt to remove their opponent's pucks from a scoring aperture by projecting their puck into the ejecting aperture associated withthe aperture 26 containing a scoring puck therein. This causes operation of an ejecting mechanism 30, shown in FIG. 4 and more fully described hereinafter, which operates to remove the scoring puck from its associated aperture 26.

Pucks 16 are projected along playing surface 14 by the projecting mechanism 20 which, as seen in FIG. 2, includes a base 32 pivotally mounted by an integrally formed pin 34 in an aperture 36 on playing surface 14. The latter has a recess 38 which receives base 32 so that its top surface 33 is at the same relative level as surface 14 and which limits the pivotal movement of base 32, for the reasons more fully described hereinafter. Base 32 includes a generally circular front portion 40 and an elongated rectangular support portion 42 extending therefrom, as seen in FIG. 1. The latter has a pair of vertically extending retainer walls 44 (see FIG. 3) integrally formed therewith which capture and slidably retain a projection member 46 therebetween. Projection member 46 is adapted to slide along base 32 between an initial or stable position shown in solid lines in FIG. 2 and a retracted position shown in dotted lines therein. A spring 48 is captured between projection member 46 and a rear stop 50, formed on base extension 42, so as to bias projection member46 into its stable position. Thus, when the projection member is retracted, to the dotted line position thereof, and released, the projection member will be impelled to the right in FIGS. 1 and 2, to project a puck supported thereon. Of course, the players can retract projection member 46 to a greater or lesser extent as desired, thereby to vary the force with which the puck is impelled into the playing surface.

In this regard, projection member 46 includes a circular carrier platform or surface 52 formed integrally therewith. A puck 16 is adapted to be seated on this carrier surface for movement with the projection member during retraction. When the projection member is released and impelled to the right, the puck moves therewith and is projected off the carrier surface 52, by its inertia, onto the playing surface 14 for movement towards the scoring end portion 22 of the game.

The pucks 16, as shown in the drawing, are of known construction and preferably include an outer plastic ring 54 in which a metal ball bearing 56 is captured by a pair of spaced parallel annular ring members (not shown). The ball bearing 56 is adapted to rotate in collar 54 so as to facilitate sliding movement of the puck along the surface. It is noted that although the game of the present invention is described particularly for use with ring and ball type pucks of the character described, other types of conventional pucks and even balls or marbles will serve equally well in the play of the game. Although a puck has been specifically described herein for use with the present invention, it is contemplated that any type of projection member or projectile, such as a ball or the like, adapted to slide or roll along playing surface 14 and enter apertures 26, 28 can be used in the game of the invention in lieu of the puck.

In order to maintain the position of pucks 16 on carrier 52 during retraction of the projection member and return to its original position, the carrier has a recess 58 formed on its upper surface to receive the ball and thus hold the puck in position during movement of the projection member. When the movement of projection 46 to the right is stopped, by engagement of end 60 thereof against stop 50, puck 16 is projected off of platform 52 and out of recess 58, because of its momentum and thus moves down board 12 towards scoring end 22.

Playing board 12 is formed in a molded plastic construction and includes a pair of plastic end wall members 62 having upper surfaces 64 on which scoring characters are molded or printed. A pair of score indicators 66 are slidably mounted on walls 64 for movement therealong and have apertures 68 formed in their upper portions69 which thus act as a pictureframe surrounding or framing for the scoring characters in order to indicate and record the players scores. After the players have used all of their pucks in the course of a round of play, as described hereinafter, they determine the number of scoring pucks they have placed in scoring apertures 26. The scores are thus recorded by mving indicators 66 along walls 62 to the numbers representing the players scores. The score, is taken at the end of each round of play and added to prior scores until a player has a total of 5 displayed by his scoring indicator.

In order to enhance the games interest, and to increase the degree of skill required to place pucks 16 in the apertures 26, or 28, playing surface 14 is bounded over a substantial portion thereof, and preferably about the scoring end 22 and the intermediate portion 70 thereof between the scoring end 22 and the projecting end 18, by a resilient or cushioned wall structure. In the preferred embodiment of the invention the wall structure is provided by a plurality of vertically extending pins or posts 72 formed integrally with the playing surface 14 and a plurality of endless resilient membranes 74. These membranes preferably are formed as large elastic, bands stretched between pairs of posts 72.

In the embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIG. 1 the scoring end portion 22 of the playing surface has an irregular configuration and thus a pair of intermediate guide posts 72a, 72b are provided to guide and hold the .elastic membrane 74 associated therewith along the irregular periphery of the scoring area. Accordingly, as seen in FIG. 1, the two sides of the elastic band 74 associated with the posts 72a and 72b engage these posts at an intermediate portion thereof with the ends of the bands held by two end posts 72.

As previously mentioned game 10 is constructed so that pucks 16 cannot be projected from the end 18 of the game directly to the scoring end 22 thereof. This is accomplished by the provision of a deflecting wall 76, preferably molded integrally with playing surface 14 and having a generally V-shaped configuration. The wall is located so that the apex 78 of the V is directed towards the projecting end 18 of the playing surface in alignment with the pivot 36 of pivoted base member 32. The divergence of the V-shaped wall 76 is selected so that a puck 16 projected by projecting mechanism 20 cannot move along a straight path into any of the apertures 26, 28, but must first strike either the deflecting wall or the resilient side or end walls 74. In addition, recess 38 in playing surface 14, in which the projecting mechanism 20 is mounted, has diverging abutment edges 80, as seen in FIG. 1, which limit the pivotal movement of the projecting mechanism to a predetermined arc so that at the extremes of the pivotal movement thereof a projected puck will flrst strike the resilient side walls 72. The are defined by abutments 80 is such that the puck cannot strike the plastic side walls 62 when it is projected from the extreme position of the projecting mechanism but will strike the near end of the elastic side wall, thereby assuring an elastic rebound from the side wall onto the playing surface and into the scoring area 22.

In one embodiment of the invention, where the playing surface 14 is approximately 7% inches wide, the angle of divergence between the sides of deflection wall 76 is 17, while the limited arc of movement of the projecting mechanism, i.e., the angle defined by abutments 80, is 80. With this arrangement, as mentioned, a puck projected by mechanism 20 cannot be shot or projected along a straight line directly into any of the apertures and thus must first rebound from wall 76, resilient walls 74, or both, before entering an aperture.

After a puck 16 is projected by mechanism 20 onto the playing surface and rebounds or banks off one or more of the resilient wall members 74, it will either enter the scoring area 22 and eventually come to rest on the playing surface or it will enter one of the apertures 26 and 28, or it will return to the intermediate portion 70 of the playing surface as a result of a rebound against one or more of the resilient wall members 74.

As seen in FIG. 4, apertures 26 each are provided with a puck support platform 84 integrally formed with playing surface 14 and located below the aperture. Support platforms 84 are suspended below their associated scoring apertures 26 by an integral intermediate and generally vertically extending member 86 and each has an inclined upper surface 88. In addition, the support platforms 84 each have an opening 90 formed therein in which the ball 56 of a puck may be seated. Thus, when a puck 16 enters a scoring aperture 26, as seen in FIG. 4, it will fall onto the supportplatform 84 and be held there with ball 56 engaged within opening 90. In this position the puck is supported in the aperture and represents a score by the player.

As previously mentioned, the game of the present invention is adapted to be played both offensively and defensively so that the players not only can attempt to score points by placing their pucks in the scoring holes 26, but also can remove pucks in a scoring aperture by proper placement of their pucks in appropriate ejection apertures 28. This is accomplished by the ejecting mechanism 30, each of which includes a lever 92 pivotally mounted intermediate its ends below and between the apertures in its associated pair of apertures 24. As seen in FIGS. 4 and 5, levers 92 are pivotally mounted between vertically extending posts 94 (only one of which is seen in FIG. 4) at pivot points 96. The levers include opposite end portions 98, 100 with the end 98 being of greater weight than the end 100 so that the lever is normally biased into the position shown at the left in FIG. 4, i.e., with the end 100 adjacent aperture 28 and the end 98 below and remote from support platform 84. However, it is noted that whether the end 98 of the lever is preferentially weighted or biasedin this manner is not critical since the lever operates in the desired manner in response to the weights of pucks placed thereon which overcome any preferential balance in the lever in either direction.

The end 98 of each lever 92 includes a projecting pin or post 102 extending upwardly therefrom. The pin is of generally cylindrical construction and is located to enter aperture 90 when the lever is pivoted in a clockwise direction, as shown at the right in FIG. 4, to engage a puck 16 seated on the support platform 90. The formation of this pin integrally with the lever 92 on the end 98 thereof provides the additional weight at that end of the lever which biases the lever into its normal position.

When a players puck is in a scoring aperture 26, his opponent can remove the puck from the support platform 84 by placing his own puck in the ejecting aperture 28 associated therewith. If this is achieved, the puck enters aperture 28 and falls onto the end 100 of lever 92, as illustrated in the right at FIG. 4. The weight of the puck on lever 100 causes the lever to pivot in a clockwise direction, as shown in FIG. 4, thereby raising the end 98 of the lever and causing the post 102 to enter opening 90 and engage ball 56 of the puck seated on support platform 84. In this manner the ball is lifted out of opening 90 and can slide or roll down the inclined surface 88 of the support platform. In this connection, top surface 104 of post 102 is inclined downwardly in the same direction as surface 88, thereby to initiate the sliding movement of the ball in the proper direction. It is noted that surface 88 and surface 104 are both inclined downwardly and towards the rear 108 of the game 10. Additionally, surface 88 may be provided with a groove 89 at its rearward edge to facilitate sliding of the puck off of that surface.

Lever 92 is provided with an enlarged opening 110 formed therein between ends 98 and 100 so that a puck 16 moved off of support platform 84 can pass through the opening 100 onto the table or floor on which the game is played. In this manner both the puck in scoring opening 26and the ejecting puck placed in ejecting opening 28 are discharged from ejecting lever 92 onto the table or the like. After both pucks have slid off of the lever, if preferentially weighted, as described above, towards the end 98 thereof, the lever returns to its original position, shown at the left in FIG. 4, wherein it is ready for use in scoring and ejecting pucks from the game. However, even if the lever is not preferentially weighted in this manner, the game will operate in the described manner since, for example, if the lever remains in the position shown at the right in FIG. 4 when there are no pucks present in aperture 26, 28 the lever will still move to the position shown at the left in FIG. 4 when a puck is placed in aperture 26, (Le, the puck engages pin 104 and causes the lever to rotate counterclockwise in FIG. 4). Thus, the lever is in the desired position for ejecting a puck in aperture 26 when another puck is placed in aperture 28.

Game board 12 is supported in an elevated position above the table or floor on which the game is placed during play by a plurality oflegs l 12, which are secured to or integrally formed with playing surface 12 in any convenient manner. Legs 112 are typically located at each corner of the game and along the sides thereof, however, only two are visible in the perspective viewof FIG. I. By providing the legs 112 in this manner, pucks l6 discharged from apertures 26, 28 in the manner described above, will fall onto the table and roll towards the rear 108 of the game. In addition, the sides 114 of the game are provided with circular recesses 116 formed therein in which the pucks 16 can be conveniently stored.

In the play of the game the players, in turn, place their pucks 16 in the projecting mechanism 20 (FIG. 2) and align that mechanism, between abutments 80, by pivoting it about pivot 34 into any selected position. The player then retracts projection member 46 to the desired amount in order to control the force with which the puck 16 will be projected. When member 46 is retracted to the desired extent, it is released and spring 48 impels it towards its stable position. When that position is reached, the puck 16 is impelled from its supported position on carrier 52 along playing surface 14 against the deflection wall 76 or the resilient side walls 74, and rebounds or banks therefrom along the playing surface towards the scoring area 22. Of course, in its path of travel, depending upon the angle at which it has been projected, the puck will engage the resilient walls 74 one or more times before coming to rest on the scoring area 22 or in one of the openings 26, or 28, or entering intermediate portion of the playing surface.

Preferably, each of two players are provided with an equal number (eg 4) of differently colored pucks with which to play, the object being for one player to obtain five scoring pucks or points during the course of the game. The game is then played in a series of rounds during which the players alternately project their pucks onto scoring area 22, with the score being determined and accumulated at the end of each round. Then the players, at the beginning of a round, initially attempt to place their pucks in the scoring openings 26 in order to obtain points which are recorded by the scoring indicators 66. The players alternate in projecting their pucks and after one player has placed one or more pucks in scoring holes 26, his opponent may elect to play defensively and attempt to remove the scoring puck from the scoring hole. To do this, the opponent attempts to project his puck 16, by the mechanism 20, into the ejection aperture 28 associated with the scoring aperture 26 in which the first player's puck is located. If he is successful in properly placing his puck 16 in the ejection aperture 28, the puck falls onto the end 100 of lever 92, causing the lever to pivot, and eject the scoring puck from the scoring hole onto the table or floor therebelow. The players continue in this manner, playing offensively and defensively until they have used or projected all of their pucks during the round of play. At that point they respectively determine how many scoring pucks they each have at the end of the round and record the scores by moving indicators 66 to the proper position. The players then play another round or rounds in this manner, determining their scores at the end of each round and adding the score to that previously recorded by indicators 66 until one player has a predetermined score, i.e 5, making him the winner of the game.

in another embodiment of the invention the ejection mechanism 30 may be formed in the manner illustrated in FIGS. 6 and 7 of the drawing. As seen therein, the support platform 184 is formed as a solid member having a flat upper surface 188 while lever 192 is provided beneath apertures 26, 28 which has a forked or generally U-shaped forward end 198. The lever is pivotally mounted on posts 196 and is normally biased by its weight into the position shown in solid lines in FIG. 7. In that position the forward edges 199 of the legs of the forked end 198 will abut against a puck placed in scoring aperture 26. However, when a puck is placed in ejecting aperture 28, the lever will pivot to its dotted line position in FIG. 7, raising the ends 199 of the lever to permit the puck to slide off of surface 188. In this connection, the opened bight portion 200 of the lever permits the puck to slide off surface 188 without interfering with or engaging the ball 56 of the puck.

Accordingly, it is seen that a relatively simple and inexpensive shuffleboard type game is provided which permits the players to play both offensively and defensively in attempting to score points in the game. The game is constructed so as to require a degree of skill in the players attempt to place their pucks in the proper scoring or ejecting apertures. The resilient walls used in the game in connection with the deflecting walls 76, increase the necessity for skill and control of the speed at which the pucks are projected by the projecting mechanism 20 and also add a degree of uncertainty to the game. Thus, an intriguing and challenging shuffleboard type game is provided.

Although illustrative embodiments of the present invention have been described herein with reference to the accompanying drawings, it is to be understood that that invention is not limited to that precise embodiment and that various changes and modifications may be cffected therein by one skilled in the art without departing from the scope or spirit of this invention.

What is claimed is:

l. A game comprising a relatively flat playing surface having first and second end portions and a plurality of apertures formed in said second end portion, said apertures being arrayed in associated pairs; a plurality of projectiles adapted to move along said playing surface and enter said apertures, and independent scoring means, respectively associated with each of said pairs of apertures, for supporting a projectile in one of the apertures of an associated pair of apertures and for ejecting a projectile supported in said one aperture when another projectile is placed in the other aperture of the pair, said independent scoring means each including an independent lever pivotally mounted below the playing surface adjacent an associated pair of apertures, said lever having first and second end portions respectively associated with the apertures in its associated pair of apertures, and said first end portion of said lever being adapted to displace a projectile supported in its associated aperture when another projectile is placed in the other aperture of its associated pair.

2. The game as defined in claim 1 wherein each of said independent scoring means comprises a projectile support platform located below said one aperture in each associated pair; said first end portion of each of said levers including means for displacing a projectile from its associated support platform to a position below said playing surface when another projectile is placed in said other aperture of said pair onto the second end portion of the lever, thereby to pivot the lever about its pivotal mounting and move said first end portion of the lever to a position adjacent the support platform.

3. The game as defined in claim 2 wherein each of said support platforms has a downwardly inclined upper surface for supporting a projectile in said one aperture and an opening formed therein; and said displacing means on said lever comprises a projectile displacemet member formed on said first end of said lever and located to enter the opening in said support platform when the first end portion of the lever is pivoted towards said first aperture, thereby to engage a projectile supported on said platform and displace it from the upper inclined surface thereof.

4. The game as defined in claim 3 wherein said displacement member has an upper surface portion inclined downwardly in the same direction as the upper surface of said support platform, thereby to urge a projectile supported on said platform along and off of the platform's inclined upper surface.

5. The game as defined in claim 4 wherein said projectiles comprise a plurality of pucks, and each of said pucks includes a centrally located ball mounted therein which is adapted to roll along said playing surface, said ball being received in said opening in the support platform and cooperating therewith to hold the puck on the platform until the puck is displaced by said lever.

6. The game as defined in claim 4 wherein said lever has an enlarged opening therein between its first and second end portions and said inclined surfaces of said platform and displacement member are directed towards said enlarged opening, whereby said projectile passes through said opening when displaced by said lever.

7. The game as defined in claim 6 including a plurality of legs operatively connected to said playing surface for supporting said game in an elevated position, said inclined surfaces of said support platforms and displacing members being inclined downwardly and towards the rearward end of the second end portion of the playing surface.

8. The game as defined in claim 1 wherein said first end portion of said lever is heavier than said second end portion, whereby the lever is normally biased into a predetermined position by gravity with said first end portion thereof remote from said one aperture and said second end portion thereof adjacent the other aperture in said pair.

9. The game as defined in claim 1 including resilient wall means located about the periphery of said playing surface for resiliently deflecting projectiles engaged therewith during movement along said playing surface from said first end portion to said second end portion of the playing surface.

10. The game as defined in claim 9 wherein said resilient wall means comprises a plurality of elastic bands.

11. The game as defined in claim 9 including projectile deflecting means located on said playing surface between said first and second end portions thereof for preventing direct movement of a projectile from said first end portion along a straight line into any one of said apertures.

12. The game as defined in claim 11 wherein said deflecting means comprises a generally V-shaped wall member having its apex directed towards the first end portion of said playing surface.

13. The game as defined in claim 1 including means at said first end portion of the playing surface for projecting a projectile along said playing surface towards said second end portion thereof.

14. The game as defined in claim 13 wherein said projecting means comprises a base pivotally mounted on said playing surface, an operator operable projection member having a projectile support surface and being slidably mounted on said base for movement between a stable position and a retracted position; and spring means operatively engaged between said base and said projection member for biasing said projection member towards said stable position, whereby said projection member may be moved against said spring to said retracted position and then released for return to said stable position under the influence of said spring means, thereby to project a projectile on said support surface towards said second end portion of the playing surface.

15. A game comprising a relatively flat playing surface and a plurality of pucks adapted to slide along said surface, said playing surface having a puck projection end and anopposed scoring end, said scoring end having a plurality of apertures formed therein and located in associated pairs with said apertures in each pair respectively defining scoring and puck ejecting apertures; means for projecting individual pucks from said puck projection end of the playing surface towards said scoring end thereof, and independent scoring means, respectively associated with each of said pairs of apertures, for supporting a puck in the scoring aperture associated therewith and for ejecting a puck supported in said scoring aperture when another puck is placed in the ejecting aperture associated therewith, said independent scoring means including an independent lever pivotally mounted below the playing surface adjacent an associated pair of scoring and ejecting apertures;

said lever having first and second end portions respectively associated with the scoring and ejecting apertures in its associated pair, said first end portion of said lever being adapted to displace a puck supported in its associated scoring aperture when another puck is placed in the ejecting aperture of its associated pair.

16. The game as defined in claim 15 wherein each of said independent scoring means comprises a puck support platform located below said scoring aperture of each of said pairs of apertures and said independent puck ejecting levers each being pivotally mounted intermediate their ends below and between their associated scoring and ejecting apertures; said support platform having an opening formed therein and a downwardly inclined upper surface for supporting a puck in said scoring aperture over said opening; and said first end portion of each of the levers having a puck engaging displacement pin extending upwardly therefrom and located to enter said opening in its associated puck support platform when the first end portion of the lever is pivoted towards the scoring aperture upon placement of a puck in its associated ejecting aperture on the second end portion of the lever, whereby said pin engages a puck on the support platform to displace it from the upper inclined surface thereof.

17. The game as defined in claim 16 including resilient wall means located along the periphery of said playing surface about said scoring end and between said puck projecting end and said scoring end, and puck deflecting means on said playing surface between said puck projecting end and said scoring end for preventing direct movement of a puck from said projecting end along a straight line into any one of said apertures.

18. The game as defined in claim 17 wherein said pucks each include a centrally located ball rotatably mounted thereon and adapted to roll along said playing surface, said ball being received in the opening of said support platform and cooperating therewith to hold the puck on the platform until displaced by said lever.

19. The game as defined in claim 18 wherein said puck displacement pins each have an upper surface inclined downwardly in the same direction as the upper surface of the support platforms, said inclined surfaces being directed downwardly and towards the rear of said scoring portion of the playing surface, said ejecting aperture being located rearwardly of said scoring apertures, and said levers each having an enlarged opening formed therein between their first and second end portions, whereby said pucks pass through said enlarged openings when displaced from said supporting platforms by said lever.

20. The game as defined in claim 16 wherein said resilient wall means comprises a plurality of endless resilient stretched membranes and a plurality of upright posts formed integrally with said playing surface and around which said membranes are stretched, and said deflecting means comprises a generally V-shaped wall having its apex directed towards the puck projecting end of said playing surface.

21. The game as defined in claim 15 wherein said puck projecting means comprises a base pivotally mounted on said playing surface for movement in a generally horizontal plane, and operator operable projection member slidably mounted on said base for movement between stable and retracted positions and having a puck carrier surface formed thereon, and spring means operatively engaged between said base and said projection member for biasing said projection member towards said stable position, whereby said projection may be moved against said spring to said retracted position and then released for rapid return to said stable position, under the influence of said spring means, thereby to project a puck on said carrier surface towards said scoring end of the playing surface.

22. The game as defined in claim 15 wherein each of said independent scoring means comprises an inclined puck support platform located below said scoring aperture in each of said pairs of apertures and each of said independent puck ejecting levers being pivotally mounted intermediate its ends below and between its second scoring aperture.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4335878 *May 12, 1980Jun 22, 1982Tomy Kogyo Co., Inc.Game having reciprocally moving interference members
US4447057 *Dec 28, 1981May 8, 1984Generalimpex Kulkereskedelmi VallalatToy with balls
US5074556 *Aug 22, 1990Dec 24, 1991Edward LoeppkyHockey
US5110128 *Feb 21, 1991May 5, 1992Robbins Mark JAir cushion table game
US5531442 *Dec 29, 1994Jul 2, 1996Sun Hockey, Inc.Hockey puck with integral rollers and method of assembly
US6227967 *Mar 3, 1999May 8, 2001David PeretzPrize redemption game apparatus
US6634954 *Mar 18, 2002Oct 21, 2003Ibrahima DiawMiniature bowling game
US8435127Feb 22, 2011May 7, 2013Leon L. BoesslingRecreational amusement
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/126.00R, 273/123.00R, 273/127.00D, 273/119.00R
International ClassificationA63F7/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F7/0005
European ClassificationA63F7/00B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 2, 1995ASAssignment
Owner name: TYCO INDUSTRIES, INC., NEW JERSEY
Free format text: RELEASE OF SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:NATIONSBANK, N.A. (CAROLINAS), FORMERLY KNOWN AS NATIONSBANK OF NORTH CAROLINA, N.A., AS AGENT;REEL/FRAME:007363/0210
Effective date: 19950224
Oct 14, 1993ASAssignment
Owner name: TYCO INDUSTRIES II, INC., NEW JERSEY
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:VIEW-MASTER IDEAL GROUP, INC.;REEL/FRAME:006732/0321
Owner name: TYCO INDUSTRIES, INC., NEW JERSEY
Free format text: BY WAY OF EXPLANATION, "OLD" TYCO INDUSTRIES, INC. MERGED INTO TYCO INDUSTRIES II, INC. AND TYCO INDUSTRIES II, INC. CHANGED ITS NAME TO TYCO INDUSTRIES, INC.;ASSIGNOR:TYCO INDUSTRIES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:006744/0964
Effective date: 19920601
Jan 11, 1993ASAssignment
Owner name: VIEW-MASTER IDEAL GROUP, INC, NEW JERSEY
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:MIDLANTIC NATIONAL BANK, AS AGENT;REEL/FRAME:006522/0015
Effective date: 19920602
Jun 5, 1992ASAssignment
Owner name: NATIONSBANK OF NORTH CAROLINA, N.A.
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:TYCO INDUSTRIES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:006225/0964
Effective date: 19920603
Jun 5, 1992AS06Security interest
Owner name: NATIONSBANK OF NORTH CAROLINA, N.A.
Owner name: TYCO INDUSTRIES, INC.
Effective date: 19920603
Sep 12, 1991ASAssignment
Owner name: BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA, THE
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:VIEW MASTER-IDEAL GROUP, INC.;REEL/FRAME:005853/0041
Effective date: 19910731
Owner name: BANK OF TOKYO TRUST COMPANY, THE
Owner name: FIDELITY BANK, N.A.
Owner name: MARINE MIDLAND BANK, N.A.
Owner name: MERIDIAN BANK
Owner name: MIDLANTIC NATIONAL BANK
Owner name: NCNB NATIONAL BANK OF NORTH CAROLINA
Owner name: PHILADELPHIA NATIONAL BANK
Owner name: STANDARD CHARTERED BANK
Owner name: UNITED JERSEY BANK
Oct 5, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: MIDLANTIC NATIONAL BANK
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:VIEW-MASTER IDEAL GROUP, INC.;REEL/FRAME:005240/0039
Effective date: 19890906
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:VIEW-MASTER IDEAL GROUP, INC.;REEL/FRAME:005240/0060
Nov 21, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: VIEW-MASTER IDEAL GROUP, INC., 200 FIFTH AVENUE, N
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST. AS OF JANUARY 21, 1986.;ASSIGNOR:CBS INC., A CORP OF NY;REEL/FRAME:004648/0575
Effective date: 19861107
Owner name: VIEW-MASTER IDEAL GROUP, INC., A CORP OF DE,NEW YO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:CBS INC., A CORP OF NY;REEL/FRAME:004648/0575
Nov 16, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: CBS INC., 51 WEST 52ND STREET, NEW YORK, NY 1001
Free format text: NUNC PRO TUNC ASSIGNMENT;ASSIGNOR:IDEAL TOY CORPORATION, A CORP OF DE;REEL/FRAME:004210/0055
Effective date: 19831108