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Publication numberUS3865969 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 11, 1975
Filing dateSep 11, 1972
Priority dateSep 11, 1972
Also published asCA994439A1
Publication numberUS 3865969 A, US 3865969A, US-A-3865969, US3865969 A, US3865969A
InventorsMulvey Gerard Edmund
Original AssigneeMulvey Gerard Edmund
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Radiator mounted raceway
US 3865969 A
Abstract
An electrical duct or raceway consisting of a generally elongated rectangular tubular construction having a back panel or wall which forms the front wall of each radiator housing, and in addition, is adapted to extend independently of each radiator housing in the intervening space between each such radiator, and is further provided with top and bottom walls which may be and preferably are formed integrally with the back wall or panel, and extend forwardly therefrom, and is further provided with a removeable front wall or panel which may be and preferably is provided with an overlapping outer top panel, and an overlapping outer lower panel, and means for removeably fastening the same in position.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[451 Feb. 11,1975

United States Patent [191 Mulvey RADIATOR MOUNTED RACEWAY Primary Examiner-J. V. Truhe Gerard Edmund Mulvey 36 Castle Assistant Exammer-Dav1d A. Tone Frank Rd., Toronto, Ontario, Canada [76] Inventor:

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SHEEI 1 of 2 RADIATOR MOUNTED RACEWAY The present invention relates to an electrical duct or raceway, incorporated in and forming part of a radiator housing, and located and positioned in an exposed exterior manner around the four walls of an enclosed space.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION I Electrical ducts or raceways such as are used in offices and institutions and high rise construction are generally mounted in the floor. This form of raceway and its location in the floor has been widely accepted in the past, but is subject to a number of drawbacks. In particular, under floor ducts or raceways do not usually extend up into the walls of a building and as a result it is not possible to provide electrical outlets around the walls. The provision of wall mounted outlets is however considered a desirable feature by tenants of such space, and such wall outlets do have the advantage that they are always readily available, and do not obstruct the floor, or require movement around the building when the partitioning of the space is being altered to provide a different layout.

In addition to the disadvantages of such under floor raceways, modern high rise construction techniques would make it somewhat difficult and expensive to install conventional ducts in the walls ofa building, since in very many buildings, the practice is to provide rein: forced building support columns atintervals around the walls, and to fill in the spacebetween the columns with some other form of constructional panels, in which the ducts could not be carried-As a result, the ducts, if they were to be embedded in the concrete in the conventional way, as in theconstruction of floors for example, would have to be actually embedded in the building columns themselves, and this would be generally speaking inconvenient, and would also restrict the flexibility of the location of the wall outlets in the building.

The design and construction of such modern high rise buildings is now more or less standardized in the great majority of cases on a construction in which window bays are provided between the building support columns, and a radiator unit or convecting unit is usually located in each of the window bays, the radiator unit or convecting unit providing for either the heating of air, or cooling of air, depending upon the time of year and the design and specifications of the air conditioning equipment in the building. Usually, such units are contained within more or less rectangular metallic housings usually not more than between one to two feet in height above the floor, and recessed or inset between two adjacent buildings support columns.

The location and installation of such radiators at spaced intervals around the walls of the building further restrict the possibility of installing the electrical outlets in the walls. Such electrical outlets would have to be either above or below the radiators, and in either case the arrangement of the electrical cords from the appliances such as lamps, dictating machines, adding machines and the like would then either have to run under or over the radiators, and in either case the close proximity of the cords to the radiator would generally speaking be undesirable from the viewpoint of safety, especially when the radiator. was operating at a relatively high temperature.

It is therefore desirable, and a general objective of the invention, to provide an electrical duct or raceway system which may be arranged around four walls of an enclosed space such as in a high rise building. which is BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The invention therefore seeks to provide an electrical duct or raceway consisting of a generally elongated rectangular tubular construction having a back panel or wall which forms the front wall of each radiator housing, and in addition, is adapted to extend independently of each radiator housing in the intervening space between each such radiator, and is further provided with top and bottom walls which may be and preferably are formed integrally with the back wall or panel, and extend forwardly therefrom, and is further provided with a removeable front wall or panel which may be and preferably is provided with an overlapping outer top panel, and an overlapping outer lower panel, and means for rem'oveably fastening the same in position.

Preferably, at suitable spaced intervals along the of openings or in the form of so-called knock outs" or other readily removeable portions, to provide for the installation of electrical outlets, telephone cable outlets and the like.

Where the duct or raceway is intended to carry both high tension electrical wiring for appliances, lighting and the like, and low tension telephone and/or communication wiring, an intermediate partition wall is preferably attached to the back panel to divide the duct into upper and lower duct sections.

In the preferred form of construction, the back wall or panel of the radiator duct itself actually forms the front wall of the radiator housing, although it would be possible to provide such a back wall separate from the radiator housing, with means for attaching it thereto, if this was desirable, for example, as an addition to an existing building.

The invention also provides as a novel combination,

' a combined radiator housing and duct or raceway providing unique features and advantages in the construction of the housing, together with the association of the duct or raceway therewith.

The foregoing and other advantages will become apparent from the following description of a preferred embodiment of the invention which is given here by way of example only with reference to the following drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is an upper front perspective illustration of a duct or raceway according to the invention, shown partially cut away for the sake of clarity;

FIG. 2 is a section along the line 2-2 of FIG, I;

outer wall, spaces may be provided either in the form I FIG. 3 is a perspective view, partially cut away showing the construction of the duct and housing as shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a top plan view of a detail of FIG. 3; FIG. 5 is an end elevational view-partially in section of the detail of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a top plan view of an alternate embodiment;

and;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the connection means.

DESCRIPTION OF A SPECIFIC EMBODIMENT From FIG. 1 it will be seen that this preferred embodiment of the invention provides a wiring duct or raceway indicated generally as 10 which is adapted to extend continuously along the outerwall of a building. The building is represented in phantom only by the building column C,-the window bay B, and the window W. It will of course be appreciated that in accordance with well established constructiontechniques such a building will often have a series of suchbuilding columns C arranged at predetermined spaced intervals around the building, and separated by window bays B. Usually, the window bays B will be closed in by means of window W, and in many cases by some additional constructional panel means (not shown) extending from side to side between the building columns C.

Within the window bays B, again in accordance with standardized construction techniques, radiators are provided of .well known design, and usually.incorposage of air from the open underside of the housing H within the building, and may be and preferably are provided with individual temperature controls (not shown) by means of which the occupants of the space may,

achieve a certain degree of regulation of the temperature. Alternatively such units can be convecting units, or a so-called induction system can be used. The term radiator is used herein as a general term referring to any and all such systems, and others, that may be used in buildings, and is not confined to any one such system. p

As noted above, these general features are essentially standardized in present day construction techniques, it being appreciated, however, that this applies only to the basic conceptof the housing H and louvres L, and not to the details of the present invention in respect of the novel housing and duct or raceway as described below.

Thus, as shown in FIG. 3, according to the invention the housing H will be seen to comprise a housing top panel 11. Panel 1] is provided with a series of slotted openings 12 to provide the louvres L for transmission of air upwardly therefrom. The housing H is open on its rear side, i.e. the side directed to the wall of the building,and on its front side, it is provided with a front wall 13 which also forms the back wall of the duct 10. In

order to support the top panel 11 in position, a back or rear support rail member 14 is provided, generally L shaped in section, and being fastened to the building by means of screws-or any other suitable means. A front support rail or member 15 supports the forward edge of top panel 11, the front supportmember 15 being again of generally L-shaped cross section and being attached by any suitable means to the rear side of front wall 13. Asbest shown in FIG. 3 and FIG. 5, the back and front support members 14 and 15, are bent or offset as at 16 and 17 respectively so as to permit the insertion of side wall 18 of top panel 11 in interfitting relationship. As shown in FIG. 5, the bend 17 in the front support member 17 is approximatelytwice the width of the bend 16 in the back support member 14, for reasons to be described-below.

In order to support the front wall 13 in position (and in fact to support the entire duct 10) there are provided a series of generally I-I-shaped support cross members 19 having a vertically downwardly slotted opening '20 formed therein, and a plastic shoe 21 arranged at the bottom thereof for purposes to be described. In order to support the cross members 19 at a suitable elevation from the floor,'a downwardly dependent leg member 22 is provided, which may be fastened by any suitable means such. as welding, or adjustable bolts or-the like.

- The cross member19 is provided with a generally L- shaped mounting flange 23 at the rear side thereof,

preferably formed integrally therewith, although obviously being capable of being formed separately and adjustably attachedthereto as desired. Screws 24 or other suitable means may be employed for fastening the flange 23 to the wall or fabric of the'building. Preferably, slotted openings (not shown) areprovided in the flange 23 whereby the height of the cross member 19 may be adjusted within limits. Alone the front edge of the cross member 19 a separate generally L-shaped connection bracket 25 is provided, preferably being adjustably attached thereto by means of screws 26, passing through slotted openings (not shown) in the cross member 19 whereby to permit a limited degree of adjustment if desired. The connection flange 25 is preferably attached to the housing front wall 13 by spot welding, or any other suitable means of attachmen t, and by this means the front wall 13-is thus located positively in position, and is attached by means of the cross member 19 to the wall or building fabric, and the weight thereof is supported above the floor by means of leg 22. Preferably, the crossmembers 19 are provided along a length ofthe housing H, at suitably designed intervals thereby providing continuous support for the housing front wall 13. Along the top of the cross member 19 a further generally L-shaped support cross member 27 is preferably fastened as by means such as the screws 28, whereby to provide support for the ends of the top panel 11.

It will of course be understood that the pipes, con- As best shown in FIGS. 3 and 5, the housing frontwall 13 also forms the back wall of the duct l0. For this purpose, the housing front wall 13 is formed in a generally channel shaped cross section, having upper and lower side walls 30 and 31 respectively, and an intermediate partition wall 32 is preferably spot welded therein along the length thereof to separate the duct into upper and lower portions for separate high and low tension services. In order to close the open front side of the duct 10 a mating duct closure channel member 33 is provided, having upper and-lower side walls 34 and 35 respectively, dimensioned and arranged so as to fit over and around the side walls 30 and 31 of the housing front wall 13 as shown.

Preferably, in order to provide interlocking engagement the upper wall 34-is provided with a downwardly directed retaining tongue member 36, adapted to interfit between the side wall 18 of the housing top panel 11, and the housing front wall 13, in the space defined by the bend 17 in the front support member 15.

In addition, the lower side wall 35 is preferably pro- .vided with a downwardly independent fastening flange 37 which is adapted to be fastened by means such as the fastening screw 38 to the lower portion of the connection flange 25 as shown in FIG. 5.

If desired, the connection flange 25 can be further reinforced by an additional connection flange 25a located on the opposite side of the cross member 19, as shown in FIG. 4.

It will of course be appreciated wall 13 and the duct closure channel 33 must be made in predetermined lengths, and assembled together to form a continuous duct 10. In order to provide for a secured join between adjacent lengths, the abutting ends of the side wall 13 will be supported by double cross members 19, one at each said abutting end as shown in FIG. 6. Such cross members 19 may of course be fastened directly to the wall or building fabric as shown in FIGS. 3 and 5. Alternatively, if desired they may be fastened to a separate joining plate 40 which will itself then be fastened or mounted to the wall or building fabric by any suitable means (not shown).

In order to connect the interior of the duct 10 to the two separate low tension and high tension services, connection is preferably made through the upper and lower connection boxes 41 and 42 (see FIG. 7) which are respectively connected to the upper and lower portions of the duct 10 through the housing front wall 13, adjacent to a corner of a floor in a building, which is of course free of a radiator at that point, and the boxes 41 and 42 may themselves be provided with suitable electrical conduits 43 and 44 for connection to a propriate services within the building. Suitable plastic grommets 45 may be provided where the boxes 41 and 42 communicate with the interior of the duct 10 as shown.

As best shown in FIGS. 1 and 2,'provision may be made for the mounting of electrical plug receptacles such as the receptacle R. Such a receptacle R is preferably mounted on a bent sheet metal support bracket 50, which may be fastened by any suitable means such as spot welding (a self-tapping screw, rivet or the like) within the interior of the duct-l0, preferably to the housing front wall 13, and preferably supports the receptacle R at the appropriate location. A removeable receptacle panel 51, having a section corresponding to that of the duct closure channel 33, is preferably provided so as to close the front of the duct 10, over the location of the receptacle R, and is provided with openings 52 for access to such receptacle R therethrough.

that the housing front I Preferably, an additional opening 53 is provided in the lower part of the cover panel 51, communicating with the lower part of the duct 10, for transmission of telephone connection cables therethrough if desired. Clearly, such receptacles are and telephone connection means can thus be provided at variable locations along the length of the duct 10, permitting a great flexibility in the arrangement and layout of the office space without causing any damage to the floor or ceiling or requiringexpensive recutting of the floor to obtain access to the duct. In addition, provision is made for a simple and yet highly efficient housing for the heat exchanger or radiator, and the top panel incorporating the louvres L is readily removeable to obtain access to the interior for servicing, or for adjustment of any temperature control system that may be provided therein if desired.

The foregoing is a description of a preferred embodiment of the invention which is given here by way of example only. 1 I

The invention is not to be taken as limited to any of the specific features as described but comprehends all such variations thereof as come within the scope of the appended claims.

' What I claim is:

1. Electrical wiring duct apparatus for use in association with radiator means such as radiator units, conduct front wall means extending between said top wall means and said bottom wall means, at least a portion thereof being removeable for access to the interior thereof, and, mounting means for mounting electrical outlet connection-means at spaced intervals therealong- 2. Electrical wiring duct apparatus as claimed in claim 1 wherein said top wall and said bottom wall means are formed integrally with said back wall means in the form of a generally U-shaped channel, and including partition means mounted along said back wall means and extending outwardly therefrom between said top wall means and said bottom wall means dividing said U-shaped channel along its length.

3. Electrical wiring duct apparatus as claimed in claim 1 wherein said front wall means comprises a front wall panel, a top wall panel, and a bottom wall panel, formed integrally into a generally U-shaped channel. said top and bottom wall panels being dimensioned and adapted to fit loosely over said top and bottom wall means of aforesaid.

4. Electrical wiring duct apparatus as claimed in claim 3 including locking recess means formed behind the upper edge of said back wall means, and including locking flange means formed along the free edge of said top wall panel of said front wall means. said locking flange means being shaped and adapted to fit within said locking recess.

5. Electrical wiring duct apparatus as claimed in claim 1 including support means adapted to be mounted in a building interior, and defining front and back edges, said back edges being adapted to lie against an interior wall of a said building, and said front edges being remote therefrom, attachment means on said front edges of said support means, said attachment means being shaped and adapted for interconnection with said duct back wall means for support thereof, with said duct back wall means constituting and forming a front panel of said housing means as aforesaid.

6. Electrical wiring duct apparatus as claimed in claim 5 including front and back support rail members, said back support rail members being adapted to be attached in a building interior at a predetermined height relative to said radiator means, and said front support members being attached to said duct back wall means, and housing top panel means removeably supported on and by said front and back support rail members.

7. Electrical wiring duct apparatus as claimed in claim 6 wherein said front support rail member is offset from said duct back wall means to define a recess therebetween, and wherein rear support rail member is offset to define a recess between itself and a said inte rior wall of a building, said first mentioned recess being of greater width than the second said recess.

8. Electrical wiring duct apparatus as claimed in claim 6 including leg means extending downwardly from said support means for contacting a floor.

9. Electrical wiring duct apparatus as claimed in claim 6 including opening means formed in said support means for carrying a portion of said radiator means and supporting same in position.

10. Electrical wiring duct. apparatus as claimed in claim 6 including front and back connection flanges on respective said front and back edges of said support means, and said front connection flanges including adjustment means to facilitate attachment and positioning of said duct back wall means.

11. Electrical wiring duct apparatus as claimed in claim 6 including upper crossmembers attached to an upper portion of said support means, for supporting a panel of said housing.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2235500 *Oct 3, 1938Mar 18, 1941Kitchen Francis AHeating and ventilating apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4216823 *Jun 5, 1978Aug 12, 1980Elpan ApsBaseboard heating apparatus with cable carrier
US4549253 *Jul 18, 1983Oct 22, 1985Flexillume Canada Ltd.Lighting fixture
US4713918 *Jan 30, 1986Dec 22, 1987Nabisco Brands, Inc.Modular wall system
US5362923 *Oct 9, 1992Nov 8, 1994Herman Miller, Inc.System for distributing and managing cabling within a work space
US5913787 *Aug 20, 1997Jun 22, 1999Edwards; John R.Communications conduit connector mounting device
Classifications
U.S. Classification174/506, 237/79
International ClassificationH02G3/12
Cooperative ClassificationH02G3/128
European ClassificationH02G3/12G