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Publication numberUS3866279 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 18, 1975
Filing dateJun 20, 1973
Priority dateMay 22, 1972
Publication numberUS 3866279 A, US 3866279A, US-A-3866279, US3866279 A, US3866279A
InventorsKennedy Harry R
Original AssigneeRichen Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Yarn processing apparatus and process
US 3866279 A
Abstract
A process and apparatus for heat treatment of yarn in which yarn is passed through a nozzle where it is contacted by heated air and through a tubular convoluted conduit while subjected to radiant heat. A second nozzle is provided at the exit of the convoluted conduit in which the yarn is contacted with cooling air to provide substantially immediate cooling of the yarn while in the relaxed state. Yarns relaxed and set by this process have increased loft, bulk and a better "hand.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 11 3,866,279 Kennedy Feb. 18, 1975 [5 YARN PROCESSING APPARATUS AND 3,439.39: 4/1969 DcVore ct ill. 23/62 x PROCESS 3,478,401 11/1969 Whitworth et al 28/62 3,526,024 9/1970 Fay 28/62 [75] Inventor: Harry R. Kennedy, Greer, SC.

[73] Assignee: The Richen Co., Inc., Greenville, Primary Examiner Louis K. Rimrodt Attorney, Agent, or FirmLyon & Lyon [22] Filed: June 20, 1973 21 A 1. No.1 37] 890 l 1 pp 57 ABSTRACT Related U.S. Application Data [63] Continuation of Ser. No. 255,399, May 22, 1972, A Process and apparatus for heat treatment of y in abandoned, which is a continuation of Ser, No, which yarn is'passed through a nozzle where it is con- 880,744, Nov. 28, 1969, abandoned. tacted by heated air and through a tubular convoluted conduit while subjected to radiant heat. A second [52] U.S. Cl. 28/62, 28/72 HR nozzle is provided at the exit of the convoluted con- [51] Int. Cl. D02j 13/00, D06c l/OO duit in which the yarn is contacted with cooling air [58] F e d Of S a c 28/ 72 to provide substantially immediate cooling of the yarn 57/34 B while in the relaxed state. Yarns relaxed and set by this process have increased loft, bulk and a better [56] References Cited h dy UNITED STATES PATENTS i 3.408',7l6 11/1968 Tradewell 28/62 22 Chums 7 Drawmg F'gures PATENTED 3,866,279

INVEN TOR. 5409/ Q KfW/KJ/ 1 YARN PROCESSING APPARATUS AND PROCESS This application is a continuation of Ser. No. 255,399, filed May 22, 1972, which application is a continuation of Ser. No. 880,744, filed Nov. 28, 1969, both now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In the production of bulked yarn, such as that used in the manufacture of carpets, textured yarn is preferably heated while under minimum tension which permits the'filaments to shrink when heat is imparted thereto. When heat is applied to yarn under minimum tension by contacting the yarn with a heated surface, as has been attempted previously, it is extremely difficult to obtain satisfactory heating since the yarn, being under minimum tension, does not uniformly contact the heated surface. This, of course, results in unevenly heated yarn which in turn produces bulked yarn of inferior quality.

Because of this difficulty in direct contact heating, it is preferable to heat yarn while under minimum tension or in a relaxed state by the application of radiant heat. Since heat transfer by radiant heat is less efficient than by direct contact, the yarn is enclosed during the heat treatment as, for example, by passing it through a heated tube of sufficient diameter that the yarn does not contact the wall of the tube. To avoid such contact, however, and at the same time to provide a practical means of processing the yarn, is quite difficult. One at tempt to achieve this has been to orient the tube vertically, but because of space limitations, the maximum tube length is impractical. Although considerable diffiwhy has been encountered in heat treating yarn by the application of radiant heat, nevertheless yarn thus treated is highly desirable, being characterized by substantially uniform dyeability, consistency of bulk and uniformly smooth hand as compared with bulked yarn produced by direct contact heating.

One recent apparatus which has been proposed for radiant heat treatment of textured yarn is shown in US. Pat. No. 3,408,716. It is difficult, however, with such apparatus to achieve consistently uniform application of heat and to maintain the yarn centrally of the tube as it travels through the convoluted tubular conduit.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is a principal object of the present invention to provide an apparatus and process for heat treating yarn in which the yarn is heated by radiant heat. The yarn is passed through a nozzle and a tubular convoluted conduit while in contact with heated air which causes the yarn to travel through the conduit while heat is applied thereto.'

It is an object of this invention to provide a process and apparatus to apply uniformly heat to textured yarn to relax (shrink) the same and set the twist therein.

It is also an object of the present invention to provide an improved process and apparatus which iscapable of producing yarn of increased loft and bulkiness.

A further object of this invention is the provision of yarn processing apparatus which includes an improved cooling means for the heated yarn.

Another object of this invention is the provision of yarn processing apparatus including improved means for heating and uniformly passing yarn through such apparatus.

' DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS In the drawings:

FIG. I is a diagrammatic fragmentary perspective view illustrating the general process and apparatus of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a partial perspective view showing one form of heat treating apparatus;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary view illustrating a portion of the heat treating apparatus of FIG. 2 in greater detail;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary perspective view illustrating an improved nozzle adapted for use in this invention;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary perspective view of a pressure relief nozzle adapted for use in this invention;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view showing one form of controlled and integrated process and apparatus utilizing this invention; and

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary perspective view illustrating yarn relaxed and set by the process and apparatus of this invention.

Referring now to the drawings, and particularly to FIG. 1, the general process and apparatus are illustrated. Yarn is fed from a supply cone 1 by a feed means which includes feed roll 2, pressure roll 3 and a stop motion microswitch 4 and solenoid 5, which controls movement of the yarn to stop the feeding if the yarn stops moving through the apparatus. The yarn is thus positively fed into a first nozzle 6 (enclosed within housing 7) through which it is introduced into a yarn tube and heating means. Heated air is injected into the nozzle which contacts the yarn passing through the nozzle and causes the yarn to move through the heating apparatus, as will be explained in more detail hereinafter.

After the yarn has traveled through the heating unit, it passes through a second or pressure relief nozzle 11 and into cooling means 12 which contains reservoir 13 therein to permit the accumulation of yarn thus facilitating cooling and setting. Yarn is withdrawn from the cooling means by rewinding apparatus 14, the rate of rewinding, of course, being regulated to permit the yarn to remain in the cooling means for sufficient time for adequate cooling. As the yarn is removed from the cooling means, it passes under bar 15 which is positioned adjacent trough 16 whereby sufficient tension is exerted on the yarn to remove any snags or kinks which may have developed during cooling.

In FIG. 2 and 3 the heating unit is shown in detail. In FIG. 2, a plurality of heating stations (a greater or lesser number of such stations can, of course, be used) are utilized in which yarn is fed through nozzles 6 and into convoluted tubular conduits 21. Heated air is injected into each of the nozzles 6 at 22, which serves to move the yarn through the tubular conduits while in a substantially relaxed or tensionless condition and also to supply at least a portion of the heat required for the heat treatment. After traveling through the tubular conduit, the yarns pass through pressure relief nozzles 11 and on to cooling chambers (see FIGS. 1 and 6).

A gun heater 30 is connected to tube 31 to inject heated air into nozzle 6. Preheated air is fed to the gun heater through line 32, being supplied thereto from is connected to a control such as shown in FIG. 6, and

is correlated with the gun heater, which is connected through lead 39 to the control, to regulate properly the temperature of the air passing through the yarn tube.

The tubular conduit 21 is disposed in a plurality of convolutions 40 about the tank 33 through which the yarn passes. As the yarn exits from the tubular conduit, it passes through pressure relief nozzle 11, which is shown in greater detail in FIG. 5. By relieving the pressure at the exit end of the tubular conduit, the yarn is moved through the conduit by heated air injected into nozzle 6. This permits the yarn to ,pass substantially centrally within the'tubular conduit and to have heat imparted thereto. Cold air is admitted to the pressure relief nozzle through line 41 which assists in cooling and setting of the yarn.

The temperature required within the convoluted conduit to bulk yarn, of course, will vary somewhat depending upon the type of yarn being processed. Using 1/29 Orlon yarn as an example, with a inch tubular conduit containing 14 convolutions, the temperature should be within the general range of about 200 F. to 1 about 350 F. Similarly, the rate of travel of the yarn through the'tubular conduit affectsthe temperature which is necessary (the faster the yarn travels, the higher the temperature which is required). The rate of travel is related to thesize of the tubular conduit and the pressure of the heated air injected into the first nozzle, since the yarn is to be disposed substantially centrally within the tube. In general, the temperature will be within the range of about 200 F. to about 500 F., the feed rate of the yarn about 100 to about 400 yds/- min., and the air pressure from about 5 to about 20 psi.

Referring now to FIG. 4, the structure of the nozzle 6 is shown. The nozzle thus includes a solid block of metal 45, such as stainless steel, to retain the heat applied thereto and to make the application of heat to the yarn Y passing therethrough as consistent as possible. The solid block has a first passageway 46 therein which extends substantially centrally longitudinally through the block. A second passageway 47 is also provided through which heated air is injected from line 31 and gun heater 30. A sensor 48 and a controller 49 (shown schematically) are preferably connected to the gun heater and line 31 to sense and control the temperature of the air entering nozzle 6. The second passageway is disposed at an angle with respect to the first passageway so that the yarn passing through the nozzle will maintain a desired twist per inch (that is, no twist is to be added or taken out of the yarn as it passes through the nozzle and conduit) and the air will pass through the nozzle and conduit with a rifling flow. In general, the angle of intersection between passageways 46 and 47 is from about 1 to about 10, preferably from about 1 to about 5.

In FIG. 5, the nozzle 11 is shown in detail. The nozzle thus includes a first passageway 50 which connects with the exit end of the tubular conduit 21 (which extends therein) and extends substantially centrally of the nozzle and communicates with a second passageway 51 which extends through the nozzle block 52 coaxially with the first passageway. A ridge 53 is provided within the nozzle block to retain tubular conduit 21 therein. The second passageway is of a substantially conical configuration and increases gradually in diameter from the place of junction with the-first passageway to a larger diameter at the exit end of the nozzle. Due to the tubular conduit 21 extending into passageway 50, the effective diameter of passageway 51 is greater than that of passageway which, along with the gradual increase in diameter, provides for the relief of pressure described previously. The nozzle also includes a third passageway 54 communicating with opening 55 in the wall of the nozzle block which connects with line 56 for the injection of cold air to the nozzle. The cold air thus contacts the hot yarn to provide substantially immediate cooling from the processing temperature, and also tends to set the yarn while' .in its relaxed state.

As shown in FIG. 1,'the yarn, after passing through the nozzle 11, is collected in reservoir 13 of cooling means 12. The cooling means comprises a vertically extending hollow mesh column 60 which may be a metal screen with the reservoir positioned adjacent the bottom of the column. The reservoir includes a plurality of fingers 61 interconnected at their upper extremities through ring 62 and extending inwardly and downwardly from the wall of the column intersecting centrally of the column adjacent the bottom to form a collecting basket. This permits yarn to accumulate in the reservoir and thus provide a longer cooling time before the yarn is wound on the rewind roll. Since the column is formed of a screen or mesh, the heat which would otherwise be trapped within the column is permitted to escape and more effective cooling is thus obtained.

In FIG. 6, an integrated operation is shown in which yarn Y from a feed supply 65 is fed to a plurality of processing stations through feed and pressure rolls 66 and 67 and into the heat treating apparatus which is enclosed within housing 68. A plurality of cooling boxes 69 are positioned beneath the housing adjacent the pressure relief nozzle of each heat treating unit to receive the bulked yarn therefrom for cooling and setting. An electronic control unit 70 is also associated with the apparatus consisting of a master 7] and slaves 72 for each of the processing stations. The master and slave controls are interrelated with preheater 73 to control the temperature of the air being injected into the nozzles and contacting the yarn, as described previously.

In FIG. 7, bulked yarn produced in accordance with this invention is shown, designated generally by the numeral 75, comprising a plurality of substantially continuous filaments 76 which, due to bulking, extend radially of the longitudinal axis of the yarn. The bulked yarn of this invention is of significantly increased loft or bulkiness as compared with bulked yarns produced by previously used processes, such as the Autoclave process, and also has a uniformly smooth hand. the increased loft and bulk can be evidenced by the increase in diameter of the yarn as determined before and after relaxing and setting. For example, 4,000 denier two ply polypropylene carpet yarn showed an increase in diameter of approximately 30 percent which, of course, means that more area can be covered with the same yards/pound of yarn.

The invention will be better understood by reference to the following specific illustrative example.

EXAMPLE Using the apparatus and process previously described, 2,000 denier, 300 filament producers twist nylon yarn (0.5 turns/inch) was fed at a speed of 150 yds/min. into the nozzle and convoluted tubular conduit. Heated air at a temperature of approximately 380? F. at l psi was injected into the nozzle and contacted the yarn passing therethrough.

The tubular conduit included 14 convolutions and was three-eighths inch in diameter. The time required for the yarn to pass through the convoluted conduit was approximately 7 seconds.

The pressure relief nozzle positioned at the exit from the convoluted tubular conduit was of the structure shown in FIG. 5. The first passageway had a diameter of three-eigths inch, while the second passageway increased from a diameter of three-eighths inch at the place of junction with the first passageway to a diameter of one-half inch at the exit end of the nozzle. Cold air at a temperature of 70 F. was injected at 8 psi into the pressure relief nozzle to facilitate cooling and setting of the yarn. The yarn was collected in the cooling means shown and remained therein for approximately 20 to 30 seconds, after which it was wound on a rewind roll.

Ten thousand yards of this yarn was produced, which was of significantly increased loft or bulk. The yarn was subsequently dyed and found to be uniformly dyeable. It also had a uniformly smooth soft hand, and was satisfactory in all respects for use in the production of carpet.

Although the above example utilized nylon yarn, it is to be understood that other natural'and synthetic yarn may likewise be processed, including orlon, rayon, acetate, polyesters, polyolefins, etc. Similarly, yarns of various count and denier can be utilized. For the sake of brevity of disclosure, however, the example will not be duplicated herein utilizing such other yarns.

It will thus be appreciated that the present invention provides apparatus and a process for producing relaxed and set yarn which is of increased loft and bulk, uniformly dyeable and of a soft and smooth hand. The apparatus and process also provide for the application of radiant heat to the yarn which is believed to contribute directly to the production of such improved yarn.

I claim:

1. Yarn processing apparatus comprising a tubular convoluted conduit adapted to permit passage of yarn therethrough, a first nozzle connected to said ,tubular conduit having a passageway therein communicating with the entrance to said tubular conduit, means communicating with said passageway and said first nozzle to introduce air thereto, means associated with said air introduction means to heat air prior to introduction-to said first nozzle, and a second nozzle connected to said tubular conduit at the exit end thereof, whereby yarn is permitted to pass through said first nozzle and said convoluted conduit in a substantially relaxed condition with radiant heat imparted thereto, said second nozzle comprising a first passageway communicating with said exit end of said tubular conduit, and means communicating with said second nozzle to admit cold air thereto to contact hot yarn passing through said second nozzle to provide for cooling of such yarn and for setting'of the same while in a relaxed state.

2. The apparatus of claim 1 in which said second nozzle includes a second passageway communicating with said first passageway and extending coaxially with said first passageway through said second nozzle, said second passageway having a diameter at the exitof said second nozzle greater than its diameter at the place of junction with said first passageway.

3. The apparatus of claim 2 in which said second passageway in said second nozzle is of a substantially conical configuration increasing gradually in diameter from said place of junction to said exit from said second nozzle.

4. The apparatus of claim 2 in which said second nozzle includes a third passageway intersecting said second passageway through which air may be injected into said second nozzle.

5. The apparatus of claim 1 in which said first nozzle comprises a solid metallic block, whereby said nozzle will retain heat applied thereto, with said passageway extending substantially centrally longitudinally therethrough, and a second passageway intersecting said first passageway at an angle and communicating with said air introduction means, whereby heated air may be introduced to said nozzle and yarn passing through said nozzle may maintain a desired twist per inch.

6. The apparatus of claim 5 in which said second passageway and said first passageway of said first nozzle intersect at anangle of approximately 1 to about 10.

7. The apparatus of claim 6 in which said angle is within the range of approximately 1 to about 5.

8. The apparatus of claim 1 including cooling means positioned to receive yarn from the exit end of said pressure relief nozzle comprising a vertically extending hollow mesh column having a reservoir therein in which yarn may accumulate to facilitate cooling.

9. The apparatus of claim 8 in which said reservoir comprises means positioned within said column extending inwardly and downwardly from the wall thereof to form a collecting basket adjacent the bottom of said column.

10. The apparatus of claim 9 in which said reservoir comprises a plurality of fingers interconnected by a ring atone end thereof and extending inwardly and downwardly from the wall of said column intersecting one another and forming a collecting basket adjacent the bottom of said column.

11. The apparatus of claim 9 including means to remove yam from said column and means positioned adjacent the bottom of said column to apply tension to yarn being removed from said column.

12. Yarn processing apparatus comprising a tubular convoluted conduit adapted to permit the passage of yarn therethrough, a first nozzle connected to said tubular conduit having a first passageway therein communicating with the entrance to said conduit, means communicating with said passageway in said nozzle to inject air thereto, means associated with such air injection means to heat air prior to introduction to said nozzle, means associated with said tubular conduit to impart heat thereto, said first nozzle comprising a solid metallic block to facilitate the retention of heat applied to said nozzle, said first passageway thereof extending substantially centrally longitudinally therethrough, and a second passageway communicating with said air injection means and intersecting said first passageway at an angle whereby yarn passing through said nozzle may maintain a desired twist per inch, and a second nozzle connected to the exit end of said tubular conduit, said second nozzle comprising a first passageway communicating with said exit end of said convoluted tubular conduit and extending substantially centrally of said second nozzle and means communicating with said second nozzle to admit cold air thereto to contact and cool hot yarn passing through said second nozzle.

13. The apparatus of claim 12 in which said second nozzle includes a second passageway communicating with said first passageway and extending coaxially with said first passageway through said second nozzle, said second passageway having a diameter at the exit end of said second nozzle greater than its diameter at the place of junctionwith said first passageway in said second nozzle, said second passageway in said second nozzle'being of a substantially conical configuration increasing gradually in diameter from said place of junction with said first passageway end of said second nozzle. a

14. The apparatus of claim 12 in which cooling means are positioned to receive yarn from the exit end of said pressure relief nozzle comprising a vertically extending hollow mesh column having a reservoir therein in which yarn may accumulate to facilitate cooling.

15. The apparatus of claim 14 in which said reservoir comprises means positioned within said column extending inwardly and downwardly from the wall of said column to form a collecting basket adjacent the bottom thereof.

16. The apparatus of claim 1 in which cooling means are positioned adjacent the exit end of said second nozzle to receive yarn exiting therefrom.

17. Yarn processing apparatus comprising a tubular convoluted conduit adapted to permit the passage of yarn therethrough, a first nozzle connected to said tubular conduit and having a passageway therein communicating with the entrance to said tubular conduit, means communicating with said passageway and said first nozzle to introduce air thereto, means associated with said air. introduction means to heat air prior to the introduction into said first nozzle, means associated with said tubular conduit to impart heat thereto, and a second nozzle connected to said tubular conduit at the exit end thereof, whereby yarn is permitted to pass through said first nozzle and said convoluted conduit in a substantially relaxed condition with heat imparted thereto, said second nozzle comprising a passageway communicating with said exit end of said tubular conduit, and means communicating with said second nozzle to admit cold air thereto to contact hot yarn passing through said second nozzle to cool such yarn and set the same while in a relaxed state.

18. Yarn processing apparatus comprising atubular convoluted conduit adapted to permit yarn to pass therethrough, a first nozzle connected to said tubular conduit at the entrance end of said conduit with a first passageway extending substantially centrally longitudinally through said nozzle and communicating with the entrance to said tubular conduit and a second passageway intersecting said first passageway at an acute angle within said nozzle, said second passageway communicating with means to introduce heated air thereto, means associated with said tubular conduit to impart heat thereto and to yarn passing through said conduit, and a second nozzle connected to said tubular conduit at the exit end thereof, whereby yarn is permitted to pass through said first nozzle and said convoluted conduit in a substantially relaxed condition with radiant heat imparted thereto, said second nozzle comprising a passageway communicating with said exit end of said tubular conduit, and means communicating with said second nozzle to admit cold thereto to contact hot yarn passing through said second nozzle to provide substantially immediate cooling for such yarn.

19. A process of relaxing and setting yarn comprising passing yarn through anozzle and a tubular convoluted conduit connected to said nozzle, injecting heated air through said nozzle to contact said yarn at an acute angle within said nozzle to cause said yarn to pass through said convoluted conduit while maintaining a desired twist per inch, imparting heat to said yarn within said tubular conduit, passing said yarn through a second nozzle connected to the exit end of said convoluted conduit, and contacting the heated yarn within said second nozzle with cold air to provide substantially immediate cooling for said yarn while in the relaxed state.

20. The process of claim 19 in which air is injected into said nozzle to intersect said yarn passing therethrough at an angle of approximately 1 to about 5.

21. The process of claim 19 in which said heated air has a pressure of about 5 to about 20 psi and said yarn is moving at a speed of approximately to about 400 yds/min.

22. The process of claim 19 in which said air is at a temperature of approximately 200 F. to about 500 F.

when injected into said nozzle.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3408716 *Mar 24, 1967Nov 5, 1968Heltra IncYarn processing apparatus
US3439391 *Sep 20, 1965Apr 22, 1969Deering Milliken Res CorpApparatus and method for edgecrimping and/or heat treating yarn
US3478401 *Dec 8, 1967Nov 18, 1969Deering Milliken Res CorpMethod and apparatus for treating textile yarn
US3526024 *Oct 16, 1968Sep 1, 1970Deering Milliken Res CorpApparatus for treating textile material
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4077097 *May 17, 1976Mar 7, 1978Akzona IncorporatedApparatus for developing bulk in a strand of synthetic textile yarn
US4204301 *Apr 26, 1978May 27, 1980Greentex IncorporatedStrand handling system and method therefor
US4833762 *Dec 30, 1987May 30, 1989Kurt KleberDevice for the production of crumple pleat crease patterns in fabric webs
US6107218 *May 11, 1998Aug 22, 2000Chatham IncorporatedChenille yarn for high speed weaving applications and improved product wear performance
Classifications
U.S. Classification28/281, 28/271, 28/248, 28/255
International ClassificationD02J1/02, D02J1/00
Cooperative ClassificationD02J1/02
European ClassificationD02J1/02