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Publication numberUS3866348 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 18, 1975
Filing dateOct 11, 1972
Priority dateOct 11, 1972
Also published asCA978744A, CA978744A1, DE2307118A1
Publication numberUS 3866348 A, US 3866348A, US-A-3866348, US3866348 A, US3866348A
InventorsDenlinger Roger R, Roby John H
Original AssigneeKusan Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy insect
US 3866348 A
Abstract
An insect-like toy object designed with an entertaining configuration for convenient assembly and disassembly and optimum convenience in molding. The toy includes the following distinct components: a head-section, mid-section, tail-section, legs, antenna, eyes and a proboscis. The mid-section, head-section and tail-section are split or divided into subsections. Duplicate parts may be assembled as steps in a game played by two or more players with the first to complete assembly the winner.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Roby et al.

[ Feb. 18, 1975 TOY INSECT [75] Inventors: John H. Roby, Bloomington; Roger R. Denlinger, Anoka, both of Minn.

{73] Assignee: Kusan, Inc., Nashville, Tenn.

[22] Filed: Oct. II, I972 [2]] Appl. No.: 296,667

[52] US. Cl 46/22, 46/26, 46/124 [51] Int. Cl [str gg es go [58] Field of Search 46/22, 26, I24; D34/2 R [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2.506.328 5/1950 Alger 46/22 3205.61! 9/1965 Onaniun 46/26 3,464,146 9/1969 McCurdy 46/22 3,520.078 7/l970 Klamer 46/22 Dl67,()()6 6/l952 Schaper D34/2 R OTHER PUBLICATIONS House and Garden" Magazine, Feb. 1950, page 33, I950 Cootie Advertisement.

Primary Examiner-Louis G. Mancene Assistant Examiner.l. Q. Lever 4 "28 3' g ntv r F o +1293? Mamk attt Windhorst, West & Halladay 57 ABSTRACT An insect-like toy object designed with an entertaining configuration for convenient assembly and disassembly and optimum convenience in molding. The toy includes the following distinct components: a headsection, mid-section, tail-section, legs, antenna, eyes and a proboscis. The mid-section, head-section and tail-section are split or divided into subsections. Duplicate parts may be assembled as steps in a game played by two or more players with the first to complete assembly the winner.

'7 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures TOY INSECT BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The invention is in the field of entertaining, parlortype games playable most typically by children. It is characterized by a series of parts which may be conveniently assembled to form an insect-like object.

The closest known prior art consists of the wellknown game sold in substantial quantities under the mark COOTIE since as early as 1945. The prior art insect-like object is shown'generally in expired US. Pat. No. D.l67,006.

While the acceptance and popularity of the prior art COOTIE configuration and design is well established, there are certain disadvantages in its construction. The configuration in use since 1945 no longer represents a pleasing modern image, and the design requires the manufacturing step of molding the parts in halves and gluing or otherwise securing the halves together to form the basic body parts of the insect-like object. In addition, the means in the prior art design for releasably securing the parts in assembled relationship is somewhat insecure, allowing pivoting or twisting of one body part with respect to another. Moreover, the prior art design lacks means for interlocking the major body parts to adjacent parts.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The invention consists of parts adapted for assembly to form a toy, insect-like object and includes a midsection, a head-section and a tail-section, and means for releasably securing the head and tail-sections to opposite ends of the mid-section. The mid-section is formed of longitudinally split subsections adapted for releasable assembly. The headsection is divided in a transverse plane and the divided subsections are also adapted for releasable assembly. The tail-section is similarly constructed. Means for releasably securing the head and tail-sections to opposite ends of the midsection is provided in the form of longitudinally extending tabs on'opposite ends of the mid-section and openings in the plane surface of the head and tail-sections adapted to mate with the tabs. The longitudinally extending tabs and the openings are square in cross section to thereby prevent twisting of one section with respect to the other when the head-section, mid-section and tail-section are joined. The tabs define a tapered shoulder facing the mid-section adapted to interlock with the openings in the plane surface of the head and tail-sections, respectively, to thereby secure the headsection, mid-section and tail-section in assembled relationship in a reasonably secure fashion. The headsections, mid-sections, and tail-sections are split to form subsections to considerably facilitate the molding of these parts. The subsections are adapted for releasable assembly by means of a plurality of projections extending from one subsection and a plurality of seats on the other sub-section adapted to mate with the projections.

The result is that the present invention is an improvement over the prior art in that the construction results in a more modern, pleasing configuration. The design simplifies the manufacture. particularly in that the molding of the parts is less complicated with the elimination of the step of gluing or otherwise securing the split body parts together during the manufacturing process. In addition, the invention provides a more secure yet releasable means for joining the body parts, that is, the head-section, mid-section and tail-section.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the assembled insectlike toy of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is an exploded, perspective view showing all the parts, sections, and subsections that make up the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a vertical longitudinal sectional view of the invention with the parts assembled.

FIG. 4 is a horizontal sectional view taken on the line 44 of FIG. 3 with the parts assembled.

FIG. 5 is a partial sectional view, enlarged from FIG. 4, to clearly show the interlocking relationship between the head-section, mid-section and tail-section.

FIG. 6 is a transverse vertical sectional view taken on the line 6-6 of FIG. 3.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The general nature of the present invention may be readily understood with reference to FIG. 1. The toy insect-like object 10 shown is made up of mid-section l1, head-section 12 and tail-section 13. Each of these major components includes subsections formed by transversely dividing the components in the case of head-section l2 and tail-section l3, and longitudinal splitting in the case of mid-section 11. Thus, midsection 11 includes subsections 11a and llb, headsection 12 includes subsections 12a and 12b, and tailsection 13 includes subsections 13a and 13b. A plurality of legs 15 is releasably secured to the mid-section l 1 and tail-section 13. Antenna 16 is releasably secured to subsection 12b of head section 12, and proboscis 17 and eyes 18 are releasably mounted on subsection 12a of headsection l2. Subsection 12a defines smiling mouth 19.

The subsections of the major body parts are adapted for assembly to form mid-section ll, head-section l2, and tail-section 13. These major components are releasably joined and the remaining body parts are releasably attached to the major components to complete the invention as shown in FIG. 1.

The detailed construction of the parts may be readily understood with reference to FIGS. 2-6. With reference first to FIG. 2. Mid-section 11 is roughly cylindrical in configuration and is double-lobed and longitudinally split in a vertical plane. The opposite ends of midsection 11 lie in a plane transverse to longitudinal axis, A These transverse planes are shown at 11c and 11d in FIGS. 2, 3 and 4. Mid-section subsections 11a and 11b include end tab subsections 20a and 20b, respectively, which extend longitudinally on each end to form end tabs 20. End tabs 20 are formed with tapered shoulders 21a and 21b and, in the case of tabs 20a on mid-section 1 la, locating studs 22, best seen with reference to FIG. 5. Locating studs 22 seat in recesses 23 in tab portions 2012 when mid-sections 11a and llb are assembled. Tabs 20, as best seen in FIGS. 3 and 4', are square in cross section for a purpose described below.

Mid-section lla includes four laterally extending projections 25 which mate with seats 26 in mid-section 11b to releasably latch subsections 11a and 11b. For this purpose, projections 25 extend beyond the plane in which mid-section 11 is split. Mid-section 11 is provided with collars 27 on both subsections 11a and 11b to serve as a means for attaching legs 15, as best seen in FIG. 6.

Head-section 12 is transversely split to form subsections 12a and 12b and includes an end 120 lying in a plane transverse to the longitudinal axis. Subsections 12a and l2b-are releasably assembled, like subsections 11a and 1 lb of mid-section 11, by means of projections 28 adapted to mate with seats 29 of head subsections 12a. The rearwardly facing transverse plane 120 defines opening 30 which is square in cross section and of a size just sufficient to accommodate the neck of end tabs 20 and seat behind tapered shoulders 21. The square cross-section of end tabs 20 and opening 30 prevents twisting of head-section 12 with respect to midsection 11. Headsubsection 12b is formed with opening 31 to accommodate antenna 16, opening 32 to accommodate eyes 18, and opening 33 to accommodate proboscis l7.

Tail-section 13 is formed of transversely divided subsections 13a and 13b and, similar to head-section subsection 12b, is formed with a transverse plane 13c which defines opening 35. Tail-section subsection 13a includes projections 36 adapted to mate with seats 37 of subsection 13b to releasably secure subsections 13a and 13b together. Like mid-section 11, tail-section 13 includes collars 38 which serve as a means for mounting legs 15.

The various body parts described are assembled as follows. Mid-section 11 is formed by joining subsections 11a and 11b. This is accomplished by inserting projections 25 into seats 26 with locator stud 22 seating in recess 23 of end tab 20. Head-section 12 is formed by joining subsections 12a and 12b as projections 28 mate with seats 29. Tail-section 13 is similarly formed by joining subsections 13a and 13b with projections 36 mating with seats 37.

Head-section l2 and tail-section 13 may now be joined with mid-section 11 by forcing openings 30 and 35 over tapered shoulders 21a and 21b of end tabs 20 of mid-section 11. Openings 30 and 35 cause end tab subsections 20a and 20b of end tab 20 to deflect slightly as openings 30 and 35 pass over tapered shoulders 21a and 21b. Openings 30 and 35 are thus seated behind shoulders 21a and 21b and the square cross section of both tabs 20 and openings 30 and 35 prevent twisting of the body sections.

With the major body parts assembled, legs are inserted into collars 27 and 38, antenna 16 is inserted into opening 31, eyes 18 are inserted into opening 32 and proboscis 17 is inserted into opening 33. The insect-like toy object is then fully assembled, as shown in FIG. 1.

The assembly may typically be played as a game with duplicate sets of parts being assembled by the contestants according to a random selection device such as dice or a spinner. The first to complete the assembly of his or her toy object is the winner.

The foregoing design provides for simple yet secure releasable assembly of the parts to facilitate use as a game or toy for children. The design also provides for ease in molding with no overhanging surfaces and requires no assembly of parts in the manufacturing process prior to packaging and sale.

Variations may, of course, be made in the aesthetic configuration of the various parts without departing from the scope of the invention. Certain parts may be eliminated entirely without departing from the scope of the invention. For example, the antenna, eyes, proboscis and legs may be eliminated without departing from the scope of the invention which resides in the unique design and construction of the head-section, midsection and tail-section as defined in the following claims.

I claim as my invention:

1. In a multiple section toy having a longitudinal axis with tabular means for joining the sections and wherein each of the sections are split into subsections adapted for releasable assembly, the improvement comprising a longitudinally extending tab having a non-circular cross section integrally formed with at least one of the sections, said tab and said section being split into subsections along a longitudinal plane and wherein another of said sections is split in a plane transverse to the longitudinal axis having an aperture also transverse to the longitudinal axis with the same cross section as said tab, said tab being removeably received within said aperture whereby a rotational force can be applied to one of said sections relative to the other of said sections without forcing the subsections apart.

2. The multiple section toy of claim 1 wherein the toy comprises three sections and wherein the improvement comprises two longitudinally extending tabs having non-circular cross sections integrally formed with at least one of the sections, said tabs and said section being split into subsections along a longitudinal plane and wherein the others of said sections are split in a plane transverse to the longitudinal axis having apertures also transverse to the longitudinal axis with the same cross sections as said tabs, said tabs being removeably received within said apertures whereby a rotational force can be applied to any of said sections relative to the other of said sections without forcing the subsections apart.

3. The multiple section toy of claim 2 adapted for assembly to form an insect-like object comprising a midsection, a head-section and a tail-section wherein the mid-section is split in a longitudinal plane and the headsection and tail-section are split in a transverse plane and wherein said longitudinally extending tabs are integrally formed with the mid-section and said apertures are formed in the head-section and tail-section.

4. The multiple section toy of claim 3 wherein the tabs define a tapered shoulder facing the midsection adapted to interlock with the apertures in the head and tail-sections respectively, to thereby prevent rotation of one section with respect to another when the headsection, mid-section and tail-section are assembled.

5. The multiple section toy of claim 3 wherein the mid-section subsections are adapted for releasable assembly by means of a plurality of projections extending from one subsection through the longitudinal plane, and a plurality of seats on the other subsection adapted to mate with the projections.

6. The multiple section toy of claim 3 wherein the head-section subsections are adapted for releasable assembly by means of a plurality of projections extending from one subsection through the transverse plane, and a plurality of seats on the other subsection adapted to mate with the projections.

7. The multiple section toy of claim 3 wherein the tail-section subsections are adapted for releasable assembly by means of a plurality of projections extending from one subsection through the transverse plane, and a plurality of seats on the other subsections adapted to mate with the projections.

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Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2506328 *Mar 24, 1947May 2, 1950Alger Don LPlastic figurine
US3205611 *Feb 6, 1964Sep 14, 1965Onanian Richard AHollow blocks and tubular connecting means therefor
US3464146 *Mar 13, 1967Sep 2, 1969Mccurdy Lois MDoll with rotatable head having interchangeable front and back parts
US3520078 *Aug 14, 1967Jul 14, 1970Klamer R BSelf-storing multicharactered toy
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4307533 *Feb 9, 1979Dec 29, 1981California R & D CenterInsect simulating mobile toy having flappable wings
US5112266 *Apr 6, 1988May 12, 1992Hall Shirl FNoise making device
US5346221 *Dec 27, 1993Sep 13, 1994Gray Gladys EColor and number game apparatus
US6669526 *Mar 26, 2002Dec 30, 2003Mattel, Inc.Construction toy set having low insertion force connecting bodies
US9504889 *Oct 23, 2014Nov 29, 2016Cobra Golf IncorporatedGolf club with multi-component construction
US20040212148 *Apr 24, 2003Oct 28, 2004Wayne LoseyBattle system for assembleable toy figures and accessories
US20150045134 *Oct 23, 2014Feb 12, 2015Cobra Golf IncorporatedGolf club with multi-component construction
US20160325156 *Jul 18, 2016Nov 10, 2016Cobra Golf IncorporatedGolf club head with removable component
USD785721 *Feb 29, 2016May 2, 2017Organic Construction System, S.A. De C.V.Reptile toy
USD785727 *Feb 9, 2016May 2, 2017Organic Construction System, S.A. De C.V.Narrow insect toy
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/100, 273/276, 428/11, 446/121, 428/16
International ClassificationA63H3/00, A63H3/46, A63H3/16
Cooperative ClassificationA63H3/16
European ClassificationA63H3/16