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Publication numberUS3866640 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 18, 1975
Filing dateDec 26, 1972
Priority dateDec 26, 1972
Publication numberUS 3866640 A, US 3866640A, US-A-3866640, US3866640 A, US3866640A
InventorsGrimm Jr John G, Sweet Harold J
Original AssigneeMarplex Products Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Log feeding device
US 3866640 A
Abstract
A centering and guiding log feeding device including oppositely disposed, readily compressible, resilient rollers between which logs are passed as they are fed into a sawing apparatus. In the overall sawing system, one device is positioned ahead of a scragg saw which cuts a log into a cant having two opposite, flat sides. Another centering and guide device is positioned ahead of a gang edger and downstream from the scragg saw and centers, and guides the cant received from the scragg saw into the gang edger where the cant is cut into usable boards.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Sweet et al.

[ 51 Feb. 18, 1975 I LOG FEEDING DEVICE [75] Inventors: Harold J. Sweet, Rhinelander; John G. Grimm, Jr., Tripoli, both of Wis.

[73] Assignee: Marplex Products Co., Inc.,

Rhinelander, Wis.

[22] Filed: Dec. 26, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 318,104

[52] US. Cl. 144/3 R, 144/3 P, 144/41, 144/246 A, 144/246 E, 144/312, 198/167 [51] Int. Cl. B27c 9/04 [58] Field of Search 83/4253, 425.4; 144/3 R, 144/3 P, 41, l R, 134 R, 242 R, 242 C, 246

R, 246 A, 246 B, 246 C, 312, 246 E, 246 F,

208 R, 208 F, 208 E; 198/167 56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 561,569 6/1896 Davidson 144/246 G 1,437,843 12/1922 Heinrichs 144/246 A UX 1,798,570 3/1931 Wahl 144/246 B 2,765,011 10/1956 Jackson 144/208 F 2,794,466 6/1957 Leffler 144/246 F 2,923,333 2/1960 Nicholson i98/167 X 3,344,826 10/1967 Mitten 144/3 R FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1,086,035 7/1960 Germany 144/246 R Primary Examiner-Andrew R. Juhasz Assistant ExaminerW. D. Bray [57] ABSTRACT A centering and guiding log feeding device including oppositely disposed, readily compressible, resilient rollers between which logs are passed as they are fed into a sawing apparatus. In the overall sawing system, one device is positioned ahead of a scragg saw which cuts a log into a cant having two opposite, flat sides. Another centering and guide device is positioned ahead of a gang edger and downstream from the scragg saw and centers, and guides the cant received from the scragg saw into the gang edger where the cant is cut into usable boards.

20 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures PATENTEB FEB I BIS- 5 SHEEI 10F 4 n l I 2% is .5... 5.5.:

LOG FEEDING DEVICE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a device for centering and guiding logs or the like as they are fed into a sawing apparatus or the like. To our knowledge, no such device is presently available which is capable of feeding logs into a sawing apparatus at speeds of more than 50 feet per minute. Even then, present devices are incapable of handling logs having excessive irregularities in their surfaces.

Prior art devices generally include oppositely disposed, inwardly slanted steel roller wheels which tend to cradle a leg as the logs are fed into sawing apparatus. In some devices, the surfaces of these rollers are spiked or starred in order to more positively engage the surface of a log. One device includes a number of sets of spiked, steel rollers, the rollers of each set arrayed in a triangular fashion around a log and biased inwardly towards one another. These rollers change position with respect to one another as a log is passed therethrough.

None of these devices will operate satisfactorily at high rates of speed. None of these devices work at all in centering logs which are particularly irregular in shape. Thus, it is particularly difficult to find suitable apparatus for producing lumber for use in low cost lumber applications. The frequency of occurrence of logs having large knots, swaybacks and other irregularities in their surface is particularly high in timber which is sufficiently economical for use in producing low cost lumber.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention comprises a method and apparatus in which the opposite sides of a log are engaged by a pair of oppositely disposed, readily compressible, resilient members as the log is moved into a sawing apparatus or the like. These readily compressible, resilient members tend to absorb irregularities in the surface or configuration of the log while still holding the log generally on the center line of the path along which it moves as it moves into the sawing apparatus. Preferably, the readily compressible, resilient members comprise at least one pair of oppositely disposed, readily compressible resilient rollers spaced such that the distance between them is less than the approximate diameters of logs passing therebetween.

Logs can be passed through centering and guiding devices embodying the present invention at speeds as high as ISO to 200 feet per minute. Their effectiveness is illustrated graphically by the cut which was made through the cant shown in FIG. 8. FIG. 8 shows a plan view of an actual cant after it had been guided through a gang edger by a centering and guiding device embodying the present invention.

Preferably, the readily compressible, resilient rollers are rotatably mounted on the ends of pivot arms which in turn are pivotally mounted on a frame. Bias means are operably connected between each pivot arm and the frame for biasing the rollers towards one another. This enables the device to compensate for overall changes in log diameter, while the compressible rollers themselves accommodate localized irregularities in the log surface. Preferably, the bias means is adjustable so that less resistance can be set for runs of a number of logs having generally larger diameters while greater resistance can be set for runs of logs having generally narrower diameters. This makes it unnecessary to adjust the positions of the rollers themselves.

One overall system employs one centering device ahead of a scragg saw and another centering device downstream from the scragg saw but ahead of a gang edger. The scragg saw is used to cut the log into a cant having two opposite flat surfaces. The gang edger is used to cut the cant into finished boards. Preferably, a feed table is positioned ahead of the gang edger which includes driven rollers oriented at an angle to a flat guide member such that the cant is driven into engagement with the guide member and is rolled over on one of its flat surfaces prior to being fed into the second centering and guiding device.

This invention is particularly invaluable in producing lumber from low grade logs. One illustrative application is in the production of lumber for use in making wooden shipping pallets. Other applications for the invention, as well as additional objects, advantages and features will be apparent by reference to the written specification and appended drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 shows a generally schematic view of an overall sawing system employing two centering and guiding devices and two sets of saws;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the first centering and guiding device;

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view of the first centering and guiding device;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary perspective view showing one readily compressible, resilient roller and its pivot mounting arm;

FIG. 5 is a top plan view of the second centering and guiding device and of its attendant feed table;

FIG. 6 is a side elevational view of the second centering and guide device and feed table;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary perspective view of a readily compressible, resilient roller and its attendant pivot mounting arm; and

FIG. 8 is an elevational view of an actual cant after it had been fed into a gang edger by a centering and guide device embodying the present invention.

PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The overall sawing system 1 disclosed in the pre ferred embodiment employs two very similar centering and guiding devices 10 and 20 embodying the present invention. One is positioned ahead of a scragg saw 2 and the other ahead of a gang edger 4 and downstream from the scragg saw 2 (FIG. I). A log is first conveyed through centering device 10 and! into scragg saw 2. Scragg saw 2 cuts the log into a cant having two opposite flat sides. The cut side boards fall out of the system down opposite sides of side board chute 3. The cant is then delivered to feed table 30 which rolls the cant over onto one of its flat surfaces and feeds it into the second centering device 20. The second centering device 20 feeds, guides and centers the cant into a gang edger 4 which cuts the cant into the finished boards.

Each of the centering devices 10 and 20 is similarly constructed in that each includes a plurality of oppositely disposed, readily compressible, resilient rollers 50 between which logs are passed (compare FIGS. 2 and 5). The rollers 50in turn are rotatably mounted on the ends of pivot arms 60 which in turn are pivotally mounted on a frame 80a for first device 10 or a frame 80b for second device 20. In the case of both centering devices, the pivot arms 60 are biased to pivotal movement towards one another by an air spring 70 operably connecting the end of each pivot arm 60 to an anchor arm 86 of frame 80a or frame 80b (compare FIGS. 4 and 7). In operation, the readily compressible, resilient roller members 50 absorb localized irregularities in the configuration of a log passing therethrough while air springs 70 allow rollers 50 to flex farther away from one another or closer towards one another in order to accommodate runs of a number of logs having generally larger or generally smaller diameters, respectively.

The rollers 50 employed in both the first centering and guide device 10 and second centering and guide device 20 are identical. They are readily compressible so that they absorb irregularities in the surface of a log passing therethrough and they are resilient so that they return to their original configuration after the log has passed. Zero pressure tires of the type employed in all terrain vehicles have been found to work exceptionally well as rollers 50 (FIGS. 4 and 7). They are filled to an air pressure which is just sufficient to hold their shape. Thus, they are filled to a pressure of around 1% pounds.

The differences between the first and second centering devices 10 and 20 result from their differing applications in the overall system. Primarily, these differences are in the means whereby logs are moved between rollers 50 and in the structure of their respective frames 80a and 80b. These in turn require the minor differences in the configurations of pivot arms 60.

First centering and guide device 10 is designed for feeding rough logs into the scragg saw 2. Since it doesnt matter where the log is engaged or how its surface is affected, a dog chain 100 can be used to drive the log between the oppositely disposed rollers 50 of first centering device 10 (FIG. 2). All of the rollers 50 of first centering device 10 are freely rotatably mounted and are rotated merely as a result of engagement by a passing log.

Second centering and guide device 20, on the other hand, is specifically adapted for feeding the two-sided cant which is delivered from scragg saw 2 into the finishing gang edger 4. It is not possible to drive the cant through the centering device 20 with a dog chain such as dog chain 100 since the smooth, fiat surface upon which the cant will lay cannot readily be gripped by the dogs ofa dog chain. Accordingly, second centering and guide device 20 includes a plurality of driven rollers 110 mounted on its frame 80b (FIGS. 5 and 6). Additionally, the first two rotatably mounted rollers 50 of second centering device 20 are driven by a hydraulic motor 120 mounted on frame 80b each pivot arm 60 (FIG. 6). Suitable hydraulic connections are provided. These provide the primary means for driving a log through the remaining three pairs of rollers 50, the remaining 3 pairs of rollers 50 being freely rotatable. The driven rollers 110 assist in driving a log therethrough.

The pivot arms 60 upon which readily compressible, resilient rollers 50 are mounted are basically the same for both centering and guide device 10 and (compare F168. 4 and 7). Each pivot arm 60 includes a main arm 61 which extends to both sides of a pivot shaft 64 which passes therethrough. A vertical arm 62 extends upwardly from main arm 61 approximately at its pivot point. A top arm 63 extends from the top of vertical arm 62 outwardly to a position over the end of main arm 61 so that a readily compressible, resilient roller 50 can be rotatably mounted between the ends of top arm 63 and main arm 61. Each roller 50 is rotatably mounted on a shaft 51 which extends between the ends of arms 61 and 63. Pivot shaft 64 is then mounted in appropriate barracks on either frame 800 or frame 80b for first or second centering and guiding devices 10 or 20, respectively.

The only essential difference between the pivot arms 60 shown in FIGS. 4 and 7 is that the pivot arm 60 shown in FIG. 7, for use in the second centering and guide device 20, includes an extension 68 depending downwardly from that end of main arm 61 which is away from roller 50. The purpose of extension 68 is to provide a more convenient mounting point for mounting air spring 70 between pivot arm 60 and frame b. Since rollers 110 take up more space below the level of rollers 50 than does dog chain 100, extension 68 is required to effectively place the end of pivot arm 60 in juxtaposition to a suitable portion of frame 80b between which air springs 70 can be connected. For pivot arm 60 for use in first centering and guide device 10 (FIG. 4), air spring 70 is conveniently mounted directly to the end of main arm 61.

Frame 80a of first centering device 10 includes a pair of spaced, top longitudinal beams 81 joined together by three spaced top lateral beams 82 (FIGS. 2 and 3). This top assembly is joined to a pair of spaced bottom longitudinal beams 83 by means of a pair of spaced vertical beams 88 on either side of frame 80a. The bottom longitudinal beams 83 in turn are joined by three bottom lateral beams 84.

To facilitate mounting of anchor arms 86 to frame 80a, a pair of supplemental longitudinal beams 85 extend longitudinally of frame 80a on top of bottom lateral beams 84. Four of the six anchor arms 86 which act as an anchor to which air springs 70 are mounted, are mounted on top of supplemental longitudinal beams 85 and on top of bottom longitudinal beams 83 (FIG. 2). Specifically, the anchor arms 86 for the last two pairs of rollers 50 are mounted in this manner. They are cocked at an angle with respect to frame 80a and with respect to longitudinal beams 83 and 85 which is approximately the same as the angle at which pivot arms 60 are cocked. Since the lead pair of anchor arms 86 must extend beyond the end of frame 80a, they are welded directly to the first lateral crossbeam 84 (see FIG. 3). An anchor plate 87 extends upwardly therefrom to a point in alignment with the end of main arm 61 of pivot arm 60 such that an air spring 70 can be mounted between anchor plate 87 and the end of main arm 61.

In first centering device 10, the pivot shaft 64 for pivot arms 60 are mounted in bearings which are secured to lateral beams 82 at the top and bottom lateral beams 84 at the bottom.

Frame 80b for second centering device 20 comprises four square box frames 91 (FIGS. 1, 5 and 6). A pair of top longitudinal beams 92 are mounted on top of box frames 91 and extend generally the length of centering device 20 and beyond the front end thereof to a point above feed table 30. The bottom crossbeams of box frames 91 pass beneath a bed frame 93 which provides the basic support for box frames 91. Bed frames 93 comprises a generally rectangular frame having legs extending downwardly therefrom.

The driven steel rollers 110 are mounted on top of bed frame 93. Pivot shaft 64 of pivot arms 60 are rotatably mounted in bearings which in each case are secured to the top cross frame member of box frame 91 (FIG. 7). The anchor arms 86 to which air springs 70 are mounted are welded to the bottom crossbeam of box frame 91 and lie generally parallel to pivot arms 60. Extension 68 extends downwardly generally into juxtaposition with the end of anchor arm 86 and air spring 70 is mounted between the end of anchor arm 86 and the bottom end of extension 68 (FIG. 7).

Each of the air springs 70 comprises a hollow rubber member mounted between two end plates, such air springs being available commercially. Each air spring 70 includes a valve stem 71 extending therefrom which facilitates filling air springs 70 to varying pressures (FIGS. 4 and 7). Typically, air springs 70 as used in the present invention are filled to approximately 5 pounds. However if a run of smaller diameter logs are to be passed through centering devices 10 and 20, air springs 70 can be filled to a greater pressure such that rollers 50 are biased more strongly towards one another. For runs of larger diameter logs, air can be let out of air springs 70 so that rollers 50 can be spread apart more readily to accommodate larger diameter logs.

Feed table 30 which is associated with second centering device receives a cant after the side boards have fallen off a chute 3 and rotates the cant over onto its side and centers the log generally with respect to centering device 20. To accomplish this result, a plurality of steel rollers 31 are mounted on a frame 32 cocked at a slight angle to a guide 35 which is also mounted on frame 32 and extends generally the length thereof (FIG. 5). Guide 35 comprises a long, straight steel beam positioned at one side of frame 32. All of the rollers 31 are driven, the end roller being driven by a motor 33 and successive rollers being driven by inter mediate drive chains 34. Because the steel rollers 31 are inclined at an angle to guide 35, they tend to drive a cant towards guide 35. When the log hits guide 35, or possibly even before. the rotating steel rollers 31 tend to roll the cant over onto its flat side. This insures that the cant will be properly oriented as it is fed into centering device 20 and as centering device 20 feeds the cant into gang edger 4.

In order to positively drive the cant into engagement with the first two driven rollers 50 of centering device 20, a spur feeder 40 is mounted to top longitudinal beams 92 above feed table (FIG. 6). Spur feeder 40 comprises a toothed spur wheel 41 rotatably mounted on the end of a support arm 42. Support arm 42 is in turn pivotally mounted at its opposite end on a drive shaft 47. Drive shaft 47 is rotatably mounted between a pair of spaced, downwardly depending mounting plates 48 which are welded to top longitudinal beams 92. A motor 44 mounted on top of top longitudinal beams 92 drive shaft 47 which in turn drives spur wheel 41 by means of interconnecting drive chain 43. A support chain 45 extends downwardly from a cross-beam 92a which extends between top longitudinal beams 92 (FIG. 5). Support chain 45 holds spur feeder 40 suspended. Mounted between a second crossbeam 92b and support arm 42 is an air spring 46 which biases spur wheel 41 downwardly firmly against the surface of a cant being fed into rollers 50.

Motor 33 which drives steel rollers 31 also drives the steel rollers 110 which are positioned below compressible rollers 50 in second centering device 20. A drive chain 34 extends from the last steel roller 31 to a universal drive member 111 which in turn is connected to the first steel roller 110 (FIG. 5). A plurality of interconnecting drive chains 112 then drive successive rollers 110.

In operation, a log is conveyed by dog chain to the first centering device 10. Dog chain 100 drives the log entirely through centering device 10 and into scragg saw 2 (FIGS. 1 and 2). As the log passes between the freely rotatable rollers 50, it is positively centered thereby. Local irregularities in the surface or configuration of the log are absorbed by the readily compressible, resilient rollers 50. To accommodate variations in overall diameter, air springs 70 compress inwardly and push outwardly. Once the log reaches scragg saw 2, the drive means of the scragg saw 2 itself take over and finally drive the log through the saw.

At chute 3, the side boards which have been cut off of either side of the log fall off. The resulting cant includes two flat sides which at this point, areoriented generally vertically. The cant is conveyed by a dog chain onto roller feed table 30. If the cant has already not fallen over on its flat side, the driving action of rollers 31 cause it to do so. Because the driven rollers 31 are oriented at an angle to guide 35, the cant is driven against the side of guide 35 and into position below spur feeder 40. Spur wheel 41 of spur feeder 40 engages the cant and, with the help of driven rollers 31, drives the cant into position between the first two rollers 50 of second centering device 20 (FIGS. 5 and 6). These first two rollers 50 are driven by motors 120. Thus, the first pair of rollers 50 serve not only as centering means, but also as a drive means for driving the cant forwardly. These driven rollers 50, along with the driven steel rollers which are positioned below rollers 50, drive the cant forwardly through the remaining three pair of idler rollers 50. As with the rollers 50 of centering device 10, these rollers 50 serve to absorb local irregularities in the surface and configuration of the log while the air springs 70 accommodate variations in overall diameter of the cants. The cants are driven into engagement with the drive means of gang edger 4 which finally cuts the cant into boards having the desired dimensions.

The cant shown in FIG. 8 graphically illustrates the exceptional nature of this contribution to the art. The cant shown in FIG. 8 was delivered to the gang edger at a speed of in excess of feet per minute. Yet, the cant was centered with respect to gang edger 4 in the most optimum possible manner. Such an irregularly shaped cant could not possibly have been handled by conventional centering and sawing devices.

Of course, it is understood that the above is merely a preferred embodiment of the invention and that various alterations thereof may be made without departing from the spirit and broader aspects of the invention.

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

1. A device for centering moving logs or the like as they are fed into a sawing apparatus or the like, said device comprising: a supporting frame; at least one pair of generally oppositely disposed pivot arms, each pivotally mounted on said frame; a readily compressible, re-

silient roller for each said pivot arm, rotatably mounted I on said pivot arm at a point spaced from the pivot point of said pivot arm whereby said readily compressible, resilient rollers are pivotable towards and away from one another; bias means operably connecting said pivot arm and said frame to thereby bias said rollers to pivotable movement towards one another whereby when a log passes between said rollers, said rollers compress individually and pivot away from one another to absorb irregularities in a log or the like while still holding said log or the like generally centered therebetween.

2. The device of claim 1 in which said bias means is operably connected to said pivot arm at a point spaced from its pivot point and on the opposite side of said pivot point from said readily compressible, resilient roller.

3. The device of claim 1 in which said bias means comprises an air spring.

4. The device of claim 3 in which said air spring is filled to a pressure of approximately five pounds.

5. The device of claim 3 in which each said air spring includes means for varying the air pressure therein to increase or decrease the extent to which said rollers can be pivoted away from one another whereby said device can be adjusted to accommodate differing sized logs.

6. The device of claim 3 in which a number of pairs of said pivot arms and said rollers are spaced along the path followed by a log as it is fed into a sawing apparatus or the like, said pairs of pivot arms and rollers extending for a distance approximately equal to the length of a log being passed therethrough whereby the entire length of the log is controlled as the log enters a sawing apparatus.

7. The device of claim 3 in which said readily compressible, resilient rollers comprise hollow, air-filled members filled with air to a pressure just sufficient to inflate said hollow members and cause them to hold their shape until engaged by a log or the like.

8. The device of claim 7 in which said hollow, airfilled rollers are filled to a pressure of approximately lVz pounds; each said air spring including means for varying the air pressure therein to increase or decrease the extent to which said rollers can be pivoted away from one another whereby said device can be adjusted to accommodate differing sized logs.

9. The device of claim 8 in which said air spring is filled to a pressure of approximately pounds.

10. The device of claim 1 in which one pair of said readily compressible, resilient rollers are rotatably driven the rest of said rollers being freely rotatable; said driven rollers being positioned ahead of said freely rotatable rollers for driving a log through said freely rotatable rollers and into a sawing apparatus or the like; a motor mounted on each pivot arm carrying a driven roller, said motor being operably connected to said driven roller for driving the same.

11. The device of claim 1 in which said bias means includes means for varying the bias strength thereof whereby said device can be adjusted to accommodate differing sized logs.

12. A device for sawing logs or the like comprising: a first sawing apparatus for sawing a log into a cant having two opposite flat sides; a first centering and guiding device for centering logs as they are moved into said first sawing apparatus, said centering device including at least two readily compressible, resilient rollers spaced on opposite sides of a path which is centered with respect to said first sawing apparatus, said centering and guiding device comprising the final guide means which control said log as it passes into said sawing apparatus; a second sawing apparatus for sawing said cant into boards; a second centering device positioned behind said first sawing apparatus and ahead of said second sawing apparatus for centering and guiding said cants as they are moved into said second sawing apparatus, said second centering and guiding device comprising at least two oppositely disposed, readily compressible, resilient rollers spaced on opposite sides of a path which is centered with respect to said second sawing apparatus, said second centering and guiding device comprising the final guide means which controls the centering of a log as it passes into said second sawing apparatus.

13. The device of claim 12 in which said second centering and guiding device includes a plurality of driven feed rollers positioned ahead of said readily compressible, resilient rollers, a straight, generally flat guide positioned above said feed rollers; said feed rollers being disposed at an angle to said guide so that said feed rollers drive said cant into said guide and cause it to roll over onto a flat side such that the unsawed, rough sides of said cant are engaged by said readily compressible, resilient rollers of said second centering and guiding device as said cant passes therethrough.

14. The device of claim 13 which includes a driven wheel positioned above said driven feed rollers and immediately ahead of said readily compressible, resilient rollers whereby said cant is engaged by said wheel and driven thereby into position between said readily compressible, resilient rollers.

15. The device of claim,l3 in which each said centering and guiding device comprises: a number of pairs of said readily compressible, resilient rollers spaced along the path followed by a log as it is fed into a sawing apparatus, said pairs of rollers extending for a distance approximately equal to the length of a log whereby the entire length of a log is controlled as it begins to enter a sawing apparatus.

16. The device of claim 15 in which said second centering and guiding device includes means for rotating at least one pair of said compressible, resilient rollers, the rest of said rollers being freely rotatable, said driven rollers being positioned ahead of said freewheeling rollers whereby said driven rollers drive said cant through said freely rotatable rollers and into said second sawing apparatus.

17. The device of claim 16 in which said first centering and guiding device in which all of said readily compressible, resilient rollers are freely rotatably mounted, said first centering and guiding device including a drive chain passing generally between said rollers for driving a log therebetween.

18. The device of claim 12 in which each said centering and guiding device comprises: a number of pairs of said readily compressible, resilient rollers spaced along the path followed by a log as it is fed into a sawing apparatus, said pairs of rollers extending for a distance approximately equal to the length of a log whereby the entire length of a log is controlled as it begins to enter a sawing apparatus.

19. The device of claim 18 in which said second centering and guiding device includes means for rotating at least one pair of said readily compressible, resilient 10 ing and guiding device in which all of said readily compressible, resilient rollers are freely rotatably mounted, said first centering and guiding device including a drive chain passing generally between said rollers for driving a log therebetween.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4222420 *Feb 7, 1978Sep 16, 1980Karlsson BoerjeDevice for feeding logs
US4441536 *Dec 24, 1980Apr 10, 1984Kauko RautioMachine for hewing square timbers
US4709609 *Dec 9, 1986Dec 1, 1987Kauko RautioSaw machine
US5096046 *May 30, 1990Mar 17, 1992Advanced Environmental Recycling Technologies, Inc.System and process for making synthetic wood products from recycled materials
US7051864 *Feb 1, 2005May 30, 2006Ching-Chi LinRoller-guided feeding device for a wood working machine
EP0076241A1 *May 6, 1982Apr 6, 1983Waco-Jonsereds ABSaw feeding device
EP1034901A2 *Aug 18, 1999Sep 13, 2000Holtec GmbH & Co.Device for longitudinal transport of round timber
Classifications
U.S. Classification144/4.1, 144/4.9, 198/624, 144/3.1, 144/248.3, 144/248.4, 144/367, 144/378, 198/604, 144/41
International ClassificationB27B25/00, B27B25/02
Cooperative ClassificationB27B25/02
European ClassificationB27B25/02