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Publication numberUS3867611 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 18, 1975
Filing dateOct 2, 1973
Priority dateOct 2, 1973
Publication numberUS 3867611 A, US 3867611A, US-A-3867611, US3867611 A, US3867611A
InventorsRaymond C Riley
Original AssigneeRaymond C Riley
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Boot and shoe drying device
US 3867611 A
Abstract
A boot and shoe drying device intended for the slow and even warming and drying of boots or shoes without injury thereto by overheating or overly rapidly drying the same, and including a pair of innersoles having heating wires disposed completely thereover in concentric loops conforming to the configuration of the innersoles, each innersole electrically connected by suitable electrical wiring to an adjustable thermostat for selecting the drying temperature of the innersoles, with the thermostat adapted to be plugged into a suitable electrical receptacle for electrically energizing and de-energizing the innersoles.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191" Riley Feb. 18, 1975 [54] BOOT AND SHOE DRYING DEVICE 3,621,191 11/1971 Cornwell 219/211 '[76] Inventor: Raymond C. Riley, PO. Box 489,

1520 Burnam Rd., Chillicothe, Mo, Domy, 6460] Assistant ExammerLarry I. Schwartz Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Marden S. Gordon [22] Filed: Oct. 2, 1973 211 Appl. No.: 402,715 [571 ABSTRACT A boot and shoe drying device intended for the slow and even warming and drying of boots or shoes with- 2l9/52i{,0251b9/32/(1) out injury thereto by overheating or Overly rapidly [58] Fieid 523 drying the same, and including a pair of innersoles having heating wires disposed completely thereover in concentric loops conforming to the configuration of [56] References Clted the innersoles, each innersole electrically connected UNITED STATES PATENTS by suitable electrical wiring to an adjustable thermo- 1,275,451 8/1918 Lillard 36/26 stat for selecting the drying temperature of the innerl,288,045 12/1918 Kuhn et a1. 1 219/211 l ith the thermostat adapted to be plugged into i g a suitable electrical receptacle for electrically energizu 1 2,692,326 10/1954 Crowell 219/211 mg and d6 energlzmg the mnersoles 3,292,628 12/1966 Maxwell et a1. 219/211 3 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures PATENIEB FEM 81915 BOOT AND SHOE DRYING DEVICE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates generally to drying devices and more particularly to a novel and improved boot and shoe drying device adapted for electrically drying the boots or shoes in a slow and even manner and without any injury thereto by overheating or overly rapidly drying the same.

2. Description of the Prior Art When boots and shoes are used in adverse weather conditions, or when inadvertently subjected to a water soaking such as when passing through wet grass, puddles, or the like, it is required that the same be dried in a slow and careful manner to assure no adverse affects to the leather or synthetic material making up the shoe, as to dry the shoe too rapidly will result in the cracking of the material or other associated. damage thereto, such as warping or the like.

Presently, the only suitable way available to dry boots and shoes is to either permit the same to air dry by normal circulation of air thereabout, or in cold weather, to place such shoes or boots adjacent a heat delivering register in a home. Alternatively, it is possible to place the boots or shoes in the oven ofa stove or the like, but this poses a danger of overdrying the shoes at a rapid rate so that the same is not recommended.

Prior art devices have been developed in an attempt to dry shoes and boots, one of such devices being illustrated by US. Pat. No. 3,154,392 which utilizes forced heated air passing through duct means to be discharged into boots for drying the same, this mechanism being overly complex, requiring a large amount of storage space, and being quite noisy in operation due to the forced air flow therethrough. In addition, this mechanism is of a bulky construction suited only for boots and not readily suited for shoes of different sizes, or, in' fact, for small sized boots.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention recognizes the problems in the drying of boots and shoes after the same become inadvertently wet, and provides a novel solution thereto which remedies and overcomes the deficiencies and disadvantages of presentlyavailable devices for drying shoes as well as overcoming the deficiencies and disadvantages of present manners of drying shoes, such as by normal air circulation, oven drying, placing adjacent a heat register, and the like.

The present invention provides a novel boot and shoe drying device which provides a slow and even warmth to the shoe to dry the same without injury thereto in a slow and continuous manner, while yet drying the shoe in a more rapid manner than other-drying alternatives.

It is a feature of the present invention to provide a shoe drying device for use in drying the shoe of both wetness and perspiration and which operates in a quiet manner making no audible noises whatsoever.

A further feature of the present invention provides a shoe drying device which will eliminate rot and mildew in shoes in humid climates, permits preheating of shoes prior to the wearing of the same, and which will maintain the shoes in a dry condition in a manner not adversely affecting the materials making up the shoes.

Yet still a further feature of the present invention provides a boot and shoe drying device which is electrically operated and includes a pair of innersoles adapted to be inserted into shoes within a range of sizes for electrically drying the same at a selectable temperature controlable by a thermostat such that the shoes will be slowly and evenly dried without any injury thereto as might otherwise be caused by overheating the shoes in the drying process.

The provision of a boot and shoe drying device, such as briefly outlined above, and possessing the stated advantages, constitutes the principal features of the present invention. The provision of a boot and shoe drying device which is relatively simple in its construction and which therefore may be readily manufactured at a relatively low cost and by simple manufacturing methods; one which is relatively devoid of moving parts and which therefore is unlikely to get out of order; one which is rugged and durable and which therefore may be guaranteed by the manufacturer to withstand many years of usage; one which is aesthetically pleasing and refined in appearance; one which is of a compact nature permitting storage of the same in a small area while maintaining the same readily available for use when required; one which may be manufactured in a range of sizes suitable for drying boots and shoes of many different sizes and types; and one which, otherwise, is well adapted to perform the services required of it, are further desirable features which have been borne in mind inthe production and development of the present invention.

Other features and advantages of this invention will be apparent during the course of the following description.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 5 is an electrical schematic circuit diagram of I the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawings in detail there is illustrated a preferred form of a boot and shoe drying device constructed in accordance with the present invention comprising a pair of innersoles 11 and 12 which are connected electrically to a temperature control 13 which in turn is provided with a plug 14 adapted to be plugged into a conventional electrical receptacle 15 such as found in normal homes and offices and supplying a conventional electrical outlet of volts alternating current at 60 Hertz.

The pair of innersoles l1 and 12 are of a shape and configuration such that innersole 11 is for the left shoe 21 with innersole 12 being for the right shoe 22, each of the innersoles including a top surface 31, a bottom surface 32, front and back edges 33 and 34 respectively, and opposed side edges 35 and 36, side edge 35 being formed of concave arcuate curved surfaces 37 and 38 with side surface 36 being formed of arcuate concave side surface portions 39 and 40. In essence, each of the innersoles as viewed in a top plan configuration has an elliptical heel portion defined by back edge 34 and side edge portions 37 and 39, and a generally elliptical front end portion formed by front edge 33 and side edge portions 36 and 38.

Each of the innersoles l1 and 12 are formed of a base member 45 which is fabricated of a rigid electrically insulating material, such as hard rubber, plastic or any other suitable satisfactory material which is electrically insulating and of a fireproof material, the bottom of the base member 45 forming the bottom surface 32 of the innersole, with the top surface 46 of the base member having disposed thereon and suitably secured thereto, such as by suitable adhesives or the like, a covering member 47 with the bottom surface 48 in juxtaposition with top surface 46 and with the top surface of the covering member 47 forming the top surface 31 of the innersole. The covering member 47 may be made of any suitable satisfactory non-conducting electrically insulating material, and may be made of the same material as the base member 45 if desired.

Disposed completely throughout each of the innersoles l1 and 12 is a continuous resistive type electrical wire 51, such as a thin nicrome wire, which is formed in concentric oval paths covering the complete innersole from back edge 34 to front edge 33 and between sides 35 and 36, the paths conforming to the configuration of the side edges in the form of concentric spiral type loops startingthrough the center portion of each innersole and extending in ever enlarging elongated oval loops in a spiral like manner until terminating adjacent the outermost edge of the innersole. The wires 51 are disposed intermediate the base 46 and covering member 47 in semi-circular cross-sectional grooves 51 disposed in the top surface 46 of base member 45 and cooperating semi-circular cross-sectional grooves 53 extending through the bottom surface 48 of covering member 47,. the grooves 52 and 53 cooperating to form circular passageways for receiving the wires 51 therein.

The ends of each of the continuous wires 51 are electrically connected by a pair of suitably insulated electrical wires 54 and 55 in a manner interconnecting the wires 51 in electrical parallel relationship, the wires 54 and 55 being joined together atjunction 56 into a single wire 57 which in turn is electrically connected to thermostat 13 having a rotatable knob 59 exteriorly thereof adapted for selective rotation by an individual user in selecting the desired temperature for the wires 51. A wire 60 connects the thermostat 13 to a plug 14 adapted to be plugged into any conventional electrical receptacle 15, the wires 60 and 57 being electrically interconnected in thermostat 13 for energizing and deenergizing the wires 51 under the control of the adjustable temperature setting by knob 59.

Referring to FIG. 5, it is seen that wires 51 are connected in parallel with one set of their joined ends being connected to wire 71 to a stationary contact 72 of a master on-off switch 73 which, in actuality, is an integral part of the thermostat l3 and operates with control knob 59 such that when the control knob 59 is rotated beyond its lowest temperature setting it effects the opening of the circuit and the complete deenergization of the wires 51. The thermostat 13 is connected in series relationship between the wires 51 and the receptacle 15 by suitable wires 74 and 75, with the opposite end of the receptacle 15 being connected by a wire 76 to the opposite ends of the interconnected parallel wires 51-51.

In operation, the innersoles 11 and 12 are inserted into a pair of shoes 21 and 22, after which the thermostat 13 is set by the user to the desired temperature in order to slowly and evenly warm and dry the shoes without injury thereto by overheating the same, the thermostat accurately controlling the temperature of the wires 51.

It is to be understood that the innersoles l1 and 12 may be supplied in a variety of sizes so as to be used in all sizes and types of footwear ranging from the smallest boot and shoe up to the largest boot and shoe, with it also being possible to provide the innersoles in ranges of sizes such that one particular size of innersole might cover more than a single size of a shoe or boot.

Further, it is to be appreciated that as the wires 51 range completely over the entire innersole from end-toend and from side-to-side, that the heat applied to the shoe is of a continuous and evenly distributed heat so that no portion of the shoe becomes hotter than a portion adjacent thereto permitting the smooth and even continuous drying of the shoes.

It is to be understood that the form of this invention herewith shown and described is to be taken as a preferred example of the same, and that this invention is not to be limited to the exact arrangement of parts shown in the accompanying drawings or described in this specification as various changes in the details of construction as to shape, size, and arrangement of parts may be resorted to without departing from the spirit of the invention, the scope of the novel concepts thereof, or the scope of the sub-joined claims.

I claim:

1. A boot and shoe drying device intended for removable insertion into boots, shoes, and the like for drying the moisture out of the same, the device comprising, in combination:

a pair of separate innersole members each of a shape and configuration adapted to be inserted into a boot, shoe and the like to be dried and conformed to the insole thereof to lay in flat juxtaposition thereover in contact therewith;

each innersole being formed of a substantially flat material having a generally elliptical heel portion and a generally interconnected elliptical front portion formed contiguous therewith the heel and front portions substantially conforming to the insole of a conventional shoe, boot, and the like with it being of a width and length to substantially overlie the complete width and length of the insole, the side edges of the heel and front portions each being in the form of concave arcuate'curved portions;

each innersole consisting of a substantially flat base member and a substantially flat covering member of the same size and configuration as the base member;

the base member having a bottom surface defining the bottom surface of the innersole and a substantially flat top surface;

the covering member having a bottom surface disposed in juxtaposition with the base member top surface and having a top surface defining the top surface of the innersole;

a substantially concentric elongated spiral groove having a semi-circular cross-section formed integrally in the base member top surface defining a spiral type configuration conforming to 'the side edges of the heel and front portion of the innersole with the spiral beginning at the center of the innersole and growing continuously larger until reaching the outermost edge portions of the innersole;

a concentrically spiral groove of a semi-circular cross-section formed integrally in the bottom surface of the covering member corresponding to and in registration with the groove in the base member and cooperating with the base member groove to define therebetween a passageway having a circular cross-sectional diameter;

means securing the covering member to the base member;

the base member and covering member being fabricated of an electrical non-conducting insulating material;

a length of non-insulated electrical heating resistance wire having a circular diameter extending through the passageway in each of the innersoles which extend over a substantial area of each innersole, the diameter of the heating wire being substantially equal to the diameter of the passageways for frictionally securing the heating wire in position in the innersole;

the terminal pair of ends of each of the heating wires terminating adjacent the back end edge of the heel portion of each innersole;

the ends of the heating wires of each innersole being electrically joined together in electrical parallel relationship; V v a thermostat for controlling the temperature of the heating wires;

suitably insulated electrical wiring interconnecting one end of the thermostat with one set of joined ends of the-electrical heating wires to place the thermostat in electrical series relationship there'- with;

a suitably insulated electrical wire having one end electrically connected to the opposite end of the thermostat with the opposite end adapted to be connected to a suitable source of electrical energy;

a further suitably insulated electrical wire having one end electrically joined to the opposite joined ends of the electrical heating wires with the opposite end adapted to be connected to a source of electrical energy; and

a manually operated electrical switch connected in series relationship intermediate the thermostat and the heating wires for selectively energizing and deenergizing the heating wires from the source of electrical energy 2. A boot and shoe drying device as set forth in claim 1 wherein the base member is formed of a substantially rigid hard rubber material and wherein the covering member is formed of the same rubber material as the base member.

3. A boot and shoe drying device as set forth in claim 1 wherein the base member is formed of a substantially rigid plastic material and wherein the covering member is formed of the same plastic material as the base member.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1275451 *Nov 2, 1917Aug 13, 1918Ernest John KingWarmer for footwear.
US1288045 *Mar 14, 1918Dec 17, 1918American Electrical Heater CoFoot-warmer.
US1566987 *May 19, 1925Dec 22, 1925Leo SimmonsElectric warmer for the feet
US2469468 *May 2, 1947May 10, 1949Judd Frank MElectric heating and drying device for footwear
US2692326 *Nov 15, 1952Oct 19, 1954Henry M CrowellElectrically heated shoe
US3292628 *Dec 3, 1963Dec 20, 1966Maxwell Janey PearlElectric therapeutic glove
US3621191 *Apr 21, 1970Nov 16, 1971Woodrow D CornwellElectrically heated footwear and handwear
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4665301 *Oct 28, 1985May 12, 1987Larry BondyHeated insert for boots
US6657164 *Oct 21, 2002Dec 2, 2003Hotronic International LimitedCustomizable heated insole
US6727469 *Nov 22, 2002Apr 27, 2004April F. ParkerHeated booty
CN102697235A *May 30, 2012Oct 3, 2012无锡莱吉特信息科技有限公司Dust collection shoe
EP0286718A2 *Oct 2, 1987Oct 19, 1988kabelmetal electro GmbHThermoplastic band for covering a welding zone and method for its fabrication
WO1998005230A1 *Jul 28, 1997Feb 12, 1998Gu ZhenjinHeat-retain type electric heating shoe
Classifications
U.S. Classification219/523, 219/211
International ClassificationA47L23/20, A43B7/02, H05B3/36
Cooperative ClassificationH05B2203/014, A43B7/025, H05B2203/017, H05B2203/036, H05B2203/002, H05B3/36, A47L23/20
European ClassificationA47L23/20, H05B3/36, A43B7/02B