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Publication numberUS3868283 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 25, 1975
Filing dateNov 17, 1972
Priority dateNov 17, 1972
Publication numberUS 3868283 A, US 3868283A, US-A-3868283, US3868283 A, US3868283A
InventorsScheyer Stuart R
Original AssigneeCondecor Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making composite three dimensional picture
US 3868283 A
Abstract
A composite pictorial representation having a three dimensional effect as well as the method of making the same, which comprises a relatively deep frame structure adapted to receive and enclose a relatively thick composite picture that is made from a number of copies of a photograph or the like having background, middle ground and foreground subject matter therein, and wherein certain copies of the photograph are cut or trimmed so that only the middle ground and foreground subject matter remain, and the middle ground and foreground portions are attached in overlying spaced relation to a whole copy having the background thereon. The resulting composite pictorial representation has the background, middle ground and foregound portions of the photograph appearing in successively forwardly spaced relation to provide a visual three dimensional effect.
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1451 Feb. 25, 1975 United States Patent 1191 Scheyer [54] METHOD OF MAKING COMPOSITE THREE 625,095 6/1949 Great Britain............,............. 35/26 DIMENSIONAL PICTURE Primary ExaminerHarland S. Skogquist [75] Inventor. Stuart R. Scheyer, Glencoe, Ill, Attorney, Agent, or Firm wolfe, Hubbard Leydig Voit & Osann, Ltd.

[73] Assignee: Condecor Incorporated, Mundelein,

Ill.

[57] ABSTRACT A composite pictorial representation having a three [22] Filed: Nov. 17, 1972 Appl. No.: 307,476

dimensional effect as well as the method of making the same, which comprises a relatively deep frame [52] US. 156/58, 35/26, 40/160,

structure adapted to receive and enclose a relatively thick composite picture that is made from a number of copies of a photograph or the like having background, middle ground and foreground subject matter therein, and wherein certain copies of the photograph are cut or trimmed so that only the middle ground and foreground subject matter remain, and the middle ground and foreground portions are attached in overlying 2 8 0 /6H lll 6 0 9 1 @151, 14 2 m m 3 c7 42 4 ,6 B65 .2 my; m3A ""6 "2 u 4 m m 2 M m 0 LM d .l Mk IF 00 55 [l [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PAT ENTS 40/1241 X spaced relation to a whole copy having the back- 40/160 x ground thereon. The resulting composite pictorial rep- 35/2 X resentation has the background, middle ground and 35/41 foregound portions of the photograph appearing in 35/73 UX successively forwardly spaced relation to provide 21 vi- ATIONS sual three dimensional effect.

am 5 me m 1 Tun 6 ar 8 LTFZM 76246 35666 99999 HHHHH 2 067 3990 8490O-I- ll ./l 03536 1 .13 415L333 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLIC 1,139,309 2/1957 161/18 3 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures PATENTEU FEB2 5 m5 METHOD OF MAKING COMPOSITE THREE DIMENSIONAL PICTURE This invention generally relates to pictorial represen-' tations and, more specifically, to pictorial representations having a three dimensional effect.

Virtually everyone who experiments in photography and who tries to capture and preserve a fond moment occasionally attains an unusually surprising result. In some instances, such extraordinary pictures may warrant additional treatment tohighlight or emphasize the subject matter of the photography and provide a unique display.

Accordingly, it is a primary objection of the present invention to provide a pictorial representation ofa photograph or the like, as well as a method of making the same which has a three dimensional effect, thus giving the subject matter of the photograph or the like an interesting and unusual impact.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a composite pictorial representation having a three dimensional effect that is made from multiple copies of a photograph or the like for which the three dimensional effect is to be achieved.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a composite pictorial representation having a three dimensional effect by cutting individual copies of the photograph or the like so that middle ground and foreground portions of the subject matter of the photograph remain from separate copies which are attached together so that the background, middle ground and foreground subject matter appear in successively forwardly spaced layers to provide a visual three dimensional effect of the subject matter of the photograph.

Yet another object ofthe present invention lies in the provision for merging the successive layers together in a manner which simulates the natural continuity of the subject matter of the photograph.

Still another object of the present invention lies in the provision for bending the foreground subject matter to simulate the natural curvature of the subject matter of the photograph.

A further object is to provide a method for making a composite pictorial representation having a three dimensional effect, which is relatively easily made and can thereby be made by individuals in their home. Still another object is to provide a composite picture having a three dimensional effect which can be inexpensively produced.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent upon reading the following detailed description, while referring to the attached drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a front plan view of a pictorial representation embodying the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an exploded perspective view of the pictorial representation illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the pictorial representation shown in FIG. 1;

FIGS. 4-6 are cross sectional views taken generally along the lines 4-6, respectively of FIG. 3: and,

FIG. 7 is a cross sectional view taken generally along the line 7-7 of FIG. 1.

While the invention is susceptible of various modifications and alternative forms, a specific embodiment thereof has been shown by way of example in the drawings and will herein be described in detail. It should be understood, however, that it is not intended to limit the invention to the particular form disclosed but, on the contrary, the intention is to cover all modifications, equivalents and alternatives falling within the spirit and scope of the invention as expressed in the appended claims.

Turning now to the drawings, and particularly FIGS. 1 and 2, there is shown a pictorial representation embodying the present invention which in this particular instance illustrates a boy swinging a bat while trying to hit a pitched ball, and also shows a number of spectators viewing the action in front of several parked cars. The particular subject matter of the pictorial representation is, of course, of little significance except insofar as it provides subject matter for which the present invention may be described.

To provide the visual three dimensional effect of the subject matter of the picture which may be a photograph or other type of picture which is capable of being easily reproduced on relatively thin material so that it may easily cut and bent. An individual who wishes to provide the three dimensional effect for a photograph may easily have multiple copies made at an appropriate photographic establishment and, in this connection, it is preferred that three or more identical copies be secured for use in making the composite picture of the present invention.

To make the composite pictorial representation 10 of the present invention, the subject matter of the picture to which the three dimensional effect is to be achieved is catagorized as to background, middle ground and foreground subject matter in a manner which generally reflects the content of the picture itself. Thus, in the picture illustrated in FIG. I, trees 12, automobiles 14 as well as the ground or earth 16 of the picture may broadly be defined to comprise the background subject matter, while the spectators I8, 20 and the ball 22 may be catagorized as comprising middle ground subject matter. The boy swinging the bat, indicated generally at 24, would in this instance, be the foreground subject matter of the photograph and comprises the primary subject matter of the picture.

Broadly stated, the pictorial representation 10 of the present invention comprises attaching a first copy 26 to a backing material 27 which may be attached to a slightly larger sheet of backing material 28 for engaging an outer frame 30 as will more fully be explained hereinafter. The middle and foreground subject matter of the picture is given three dimensional effect by taking other copies of the picture and trimming away everything so that only the middle ground and foreground subject matter remains and thereafter applying said middle ground subject matter in spaced relation but overlying the picture copy 26 that has been attached to the backing material 27. Similarly, the foreground subject matter is attached in spaced relation to the middle ground subject matter so that it overlies the background and middle ground subject matter, with the result that the background. middle ground and foreground subject matter of the picture appears in succes- To attach the cut out subject matter of the picture to the background picture 26, it is preferred to use lightweight pieces of spacer material 32 which may comprise material such as balsa wood, foamed styrene plastic or other lightweight plastic. It is preferred that the picture copies be of a material which easily accepts commonly used adhesive so that the spacers can be easily glued to the picture material. The spacers should be of sufficiently small dimensions so they are not easily seen when the completed composite pictorial representation is viewed at a slight angle.

As can be seen from the exploded perspective view shown in FIG. 2, the background is shown to be the subject matter within bracket 34 and the foreground subject matter within the bracket 36.

In accordance with another aspect of the present invention, the foreground as well as the middle ground of the subject matter may be slopingly merged into adjacent layers. With respect to the boy 22 who has left and right legs 40, 42, right and left arms 42, 44 and a torso 46, this merging effect is shown in FIG. 4, for example, with respect to the right leg 40 of the boy 22, and in FIGS. 2 and 7 wherein the right and left arms 42, 44 are shown to slopingly engage one another to simulate the natural continuity of the subject matter of the picture. Moreover, another copy of the picture may be trimmed to leave certain preselected portions of the foreground subject matter, such as the left arm of the boy 44 and may be attached using a spacer 32 to simulate the natural three dimensional appearance of the subject matter of the picture. Thus, in this instance, it can be easily visualized that the left arm and shoulder would be closer to the viewer and accordingly that portion may be spaced away from the rest of the body of the boy to provide further realism or depth to the subject matter ofthe picture. As is shown in FIG. 7, the outermost left arm 44 is also conveniently sloped toward the adjacent foreground subject matter near the hand to simulate the natural continuity of the position of the hands, since the left and right arms naturally hold the bat in the same plane.

ln accordance with another aspect of the present invention, it is preferred that the spacer material be somewhat deformable under reasonable pressure so that the sloping of the foreground and middle ground materials can be relatively easily performed. In this connection, balsa wood and expanded or foamed styrene plastic are materials which are capable of such deformability.

In keeping with the invention, the portions of the composite pictorial representation that are viewed from the front may also be deformed or curved to simulate the natural curvature of the subject matter of the picture to promote additional realism or depth as, for example, bending the torso 46 arms, legs and head of the boy to simulate the expected natural curvature of the body. This effect can be easily achieved by manipulating the cut out portions either before or after they have been attached.

After the composite picture has been assembled it is only necessary to insert it in the frame structure 30 which should be sufficiently deep to accommodate the relatively thick pictorial representation and which may include a sheet of transparent material, such as glass 50 or the like positioned near the front thereof to prevent dust from accummulating on the pictorial representation as well as prevent curious onlookers from damaging the end result. The frame may have a cut out portion 52 with a land area 54 adapted to engage the additional backing layer 28 to support the composite shown in FIG. 7. 7

Thus, embodiments of the three dimensional pictorial representations have been shown and described herein which satisfy all of the above mentioned objects and advantages.

I claim as my invention:

1. A method for making a composite pictorial representation having a three dimensional effect, comprising the steps of:

providing multiple copies of a picture for which the three dimensional effect is to be achieved; attaching a first one of said pictures to a backing material; cutting away everything but the middle ground portions of a second one of said pictures and attaching said middle ground portion to said first one of said pictures in spaced relation to thereby emphasize said middle ground portion of said second one of said pictures; cutting away everything but certain foreground portions from a third one of said pictures and attaching it in spaced relation overlying said attached second middle ground portion to thereby emphasize said foreground portion of said third picture;

individually bending selected ones of said middle and foreground portions of said picture to slopingly converge horizontally and vertically upon subadjacent portions to simulate natural continuity of the subject matter of the picture to produce a composite pictorial representation having the background, middle ground and foreground of said picture appearing in successively forwardly spaced layers and provide a visual three dimensional effect of the subject matter in said picture.

2. A method as defined in claim 1 including the steps of cutting away everything but certain preselected por tions of the foreground from a fourth picture, attaching said preselected portions in spaced relation overlying said attached foreground portion and individually bending selected ones of the most forwardly portions of said picture so that their curvature simulates the natural curvature of the subject matter pictured by said selected portions and to provide further three dimensional depth of said preselected portions of said foreground portion.

3. A method as defined in claim I wherein said middle and foreground portions are attached in spaced relation by applying adhesive on opposite sides of lightweight spacer material and wherein said spacer material is deformable to facilitate bending selected ones of said middle and foreground portions and is of a size so said material cannot be seen when viewing the composite picture from a slight angle.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4255033 *Feb 23, 1979Mar 10, 1981Rose Gordon MUniversal focus multiplanar camera
US4294634 *Apr 1, 1980Oct 13, 1981Byun MookilMethod for manufacturing a solid statue
US4438579 *May 2, 1983Mar 27, 1984Engel Robert WThree-dimensional picture with interchangeable scenes
US4530863 *Mar 4, 1983Jul 23, 1985Seeger Richard WContoured photographic images on dimensional stable backing
US4777067 *Apr 3, 1987Oct 11, 1988Woronow Donald FFoam backing, adhesive layers, protective coating; three-dimensional
US5096204 *Jul 13, 1990Mar 17, 1992Lippman Peter J HThree-dimensional book or game board structure
US5172503 *Feb 20, 1991Dec 22, 1992Photoscape, Inc.Display unit having vertical relief
US5417431 *Nov 3, 1993May 23, 1995Laservison Productions, Inc.Trading card with three-dimensional effect
US5421583 *Feb 7, 1994Jun 6, 1995Laservision Productions, Inc.Print media products with enhanced realism
US5441778 *Sep 2, 1993Aug 15, 1995Gilbreath; Mykos M.3-D illustration
US5470410 *Mar 31, 1994Nov 28, 1995Photo Sculptures, Inc.Method for producing a three-dimensional work from a two-dimensional work
US5782698 *Apr 5, 1996Jul 21, 1998Keller; AllanOptical illusion device
US5783005 *May 20, 1996Jul 21, 1998M&R Pictures, U.S.A., Inc.Method for presenting a picture
US5803501 *Dec 15, 1994Sep 8, 1998Lncj LimitedMemorabilia card
US6142532 *Sep 8, 1998Nov 7, 2000Lncj LimitedMemorabilia card
US6289567Jul 10, 1998Sep 18, 2001Mari-Lyn RobertsonMethod of making a personalized picture frame that is an extension of the displayed photograph
US6532345Oct 22, 1997Mar 11, 2003L. N. C. J. LimitedImaging system and method
US6546400Sep 13, 1999Apr 8, 2003Nathan G. AbersonMethod and system for creating trading cards
US6627271 *Mar 30, 2000Sep 30, 2003National Institute Of Advanced Industrial Science And TechnologyOverlaying replica, heaping replica and methods of manufacturing same
US6698943Aug 29, 2002Mar 2, 2004Media Technologies Licensing, Llc.Imaging system and method
US7077581Mar 1, 2004Jul 18, 2006Media Technologies Licensing LlcImaging system and method
US20100011644 *Jul 17, 2009Jan 21, 2010Kramer Eric JMemorabilia display system
US20110277605 *Apr 25, 2011Nov 17, 2011Ralph Howard SuttonMethod to create 3-dimensional images from a photograph
EP0077426A1 *Dec 14, 1981Apr 27, 1983Bertram Henry PaxtonA method of and kit of parts for making a three-dimensional plaque or picture
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Classifications
U.S. Classification156/58, 428/13, 40/800, 428/14
International ClassificationB44F7/00, B44C1/00, B44C3/02, B44C1/28, B44C3/00
Cooperative ClassificationB44C3/025, B44F7/00, B44C1/28
European ClassificationB44F7/00, B44C3/02B, B44C1/28