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Publication numberUS3868295 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 25, 1975
Filing dateApr 1, 1974
Priority dateApr 1, 1974
Publication numberUS 3868295 A, US 3868295A, US-A-3868295, US3868295 A, US3868295A
InventorsJr Garret J Boone
Original AssigneeJr Garret J Boone
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Geometric building module
US 3868295 A
Abstract
A geometric building module comprising seven equal sized equilateral triangles joined together so that one corner of each triangle meets at a common center point with corner points of the other six triangles, each triangle having two sides extending outwardly from the center point and a base connecting or extending between the distal ends of its two sides. Each side of each triangle coincides with the adjacent side of the adjacent triangle. One of the triangles defines a common plane including the said common center point, and each of the other triangles has one of its sides lying in the common plane and the other of its sides inclining away from one side of the common plane. When the said one triangle which defines a common plane is placed flat against a planar surface, each of the other triangles will be inclined relative to that planar surface, but will have a side lying against that planar surface.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Boone, Jr.

[ GEOMETRIC BUILDING MODULE Garret J. Boone, Jr., 820 Hidden 'Valley Ln., Richmond, Ind. 47374 22 Filed: Apr, 1, 1974 211 App]. No.: 457,106

[76] Inventor:

[52] U.S. Cl 161/15, 52/82, 52/DIG. 10 [51] Int. Cl E04b 7/02 [58] Field of Search 52/81, 82, 237, DIG. 10; 161/15 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,997,022 4/1935 Stalker 52/DIG. 10 2,633,657 4/1953 Warren 52/DlG. 10 3,016,115 l/l962 Harrison 52/82 3,255,556 6/1966 DAmato 52/81 3,302,321 2/1967 Walker 52/D1G. 10 3,708,910 l/l973 Skillman..... 52/DlG. 10 3,757,430 9/1973 MacBride 52/D1G. l0 Dl96,l0l 8/1963 Bittner 52/81 D204,239 4/1966 Upor 52/82 Primary ExaminerFrank L. Abbott Assistant Examiner-l-lenry Raduazo Attorney, Agent, or Firm-William R. Coffey [57] ABSTRACT A geometric building module comprising seven equal sized equilateral triangles joined together so that one corner of each triangle meets at a common center point with corner points of the other six triangles, each triangle having two sides extending outwardly from the center point and a base connecting or extending between the distal ends of its two sides. Each side of each triangle coincides with the adjacent side of the adjacent triangle. One of the triangles defines a common plane including the said common center point, and each of the other triangles has one of its sides lying in the common plane and the other of its sides inclining away from one side of the common plane. When the said one triangle which'defines a common plane is placed flat against a planar surface, each of the other triangles will be inclined relative to that planar surface, but will have a side lying against that planar surface.

4 Claims, 15 Drawing Figures IAIENTEDFEB 25 1915 saw 1 er 4 PATENTEDFEB2 5 1915 saw 2 or 4 GEOMETRIC BUILDING MODULE The present invention relates to building modules, and more particularly to the provision of a building module which takes the form of a new geometric figure having a basic triangular rhythmic character and possessing some aspects of radial and bilateral symmetry as well as parallel and perpendicular edge qualities.

In this description and in the claims appended hereto, the words geometric building module" define a component of a larger structure comprising a plurality of such components It is my concept to provide such a module which can be used as a basic building block or building component to provide all sorts of structures including building structures, shelter structures, and purely decorative structures.

I am using the work module to indicate that building components constructed in accordance with my present invention may be used as standard components in constructing assemblies or larger structures.

My geometric building module is ideally suited, for instance, for use as a shelter. One or more of the modules may be used as a canopy or tent.

Because of its nature, my building modules may be used for purely decorative purposes. For instance, 20 or so such modules may be connected together to form a decorative wreath. In forming a wreath, I prefer to connect the modules together in pairs and then to connect the pairs together to form a closed circle.

Other objects and features of my present invention will become apparent as this description progresses.

To the accomplishment of the above and related objects, this invention may be embodied in the forms illustrated in the accompanying drawings, attention being called to the fact, however, that the drawings are illustrative only, and that change may be made in the specific constructions illustrated and described, so long as.

the scope of the appended claims is not violated.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a view of a hexagon comprising six equilateral triangles, one of which is shaded to indicate that an additional equilateral triangle will be added to the six that are there to provide a geometric figure having seven equal sized equilateral triangles;

FIG. 2 is a top view looking vertically downwardly on the said geometric figure with the additional equilateral triangle being held in ahorizontal plane;

FIGS. 2a-2d are side views taken from FIG. 2 generally perpendicularly to the reference lines 2a-2d;

FIG. 3 is a top view of a building module which is constructed in accordance with the said geometric figure, the view of FIG. 3 being inverted relative to FIG. 2, and the module being used as a tent or canopy;

FIG. 3a shows two of the FIG. 3 tents or canopies joined together;

FIG. 4 is a side view of the tent of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the tent of FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is another side view of the tent of FIG. 3;

FIG. 7 is a wreath constructed by connecting together identical and rigid or stiff geometric figures constructed in accordance with FIG. 2;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a wreath constructed from 20 of the geometric figures which are joined together and which are made from flexible sheet material;

FIG. 9 shows two of such geometric figures connected together to form a part of the wreath of FIG. 8; and

FIG. 10 is a view of a layout of a flat sheet showing how I may form the two geometric figures of FIG. 9.

It is well known that a perfect hexagon may be divided into six equilateral triangles, i.e., six equal sized triangles having three equal length sides and three equal included angles. When a hexagon is so divided, by reference lines drawn from opposing points, the reference lines cross at a center point X. In FIG. 1, equal length sides s and equal included angles a are defined by drawing such intersecting lines from opposite points. The six equilateral triangles are identified by the reference numerals 10, l2, l4, 16, 18 and 20. The triangle 20 is shaded only for the purpose of indicating that a seventh equilateral triangle 22 overlies the triangle 20. The geometric figure of the present invention, therefore, is created when the seams between the triangles l0-20 are made bendable or flexible about the rectilinear lines defining such seams and when the seam between the triangle 10 and triangle 20 is separated so that the additional triangle 22 may be inserted therebetween.

With the additional triangle 22, the figure can never lie in a flat plane as is the case with the perfect hexagon originally discussed. FIGS. 2 and 2a-2d depict the shape created by the additional triangle 22. Looking at FIG. 2, which is a view taken looking vertically downwardly at the geometric figure of the present invention, it will be seen that the additional triangle 22 lies in a horizontal plane such that each of its included angles, looking vertically downwardly, is a 60 angle and each of its sides s is equal in length to its other two sides s.

When the additional triangle 22 is held in a horizontal plane, for instance, against the upwardly facing planar surface of a table top, the common edges or sides 40, 42 between the triangles l2, l4 and 16, 18 also lie in the same horizontal plane as the additional triangle 22. The common sides or edges 44, 46, 48, respectively, between the triangles l0 and 12, 14 and 16, and 18 and 20, incline upwardly from the center point X in the said common horizontal plane. Because of the symmetry, the common sides or edges 44, 46, 48 incline upwardly from the common point X at the same angle, approximately 40 to 45. It will be appreciated that the common sides 44, 46, 48 lie in vertically extending planes which extend radially outwardly from the center point X, and that the plane for side 46 bisects the adjacent included angle of the additional triangle 22.

Of course, the common side or edge 50 between the triangles 20 and 22 and the common side 52 between the triangles 10 and 22 lie in the same horizontal plane as the additional triangle 22.

Looking vertically downwardly at FIG. 2, it will be seen that the angle between the common sides 42, 50 is that the angle between the common sides 40, 42 is 100, and that the angle between the common sides 40, 52 is 100. The included angle of the additional triangle 22 adjacent the center point X, of course, is 60 to complete the full 360.

The 7-sided geometric figure illustrated and thus far described, therefore, is a figure including seven equal sized equilateral triangles meeting together at a common center point X, each triangle having two sides leading away from said common point and a base extending between the distal ends of its two sides. The plane of the additional triangle 22 and one edge of each of the other six triangles 10-20 all lie in a common plane. The edges of the triangles, as they form a com- 3 mon plane, describe a 60, 100, 100 and 100 pattern in rotation from their common point X on the common plane. The plane of each of the six triangles l20 with one edge on the plane common with the additional triangle 22, is inclined at an angle of approximately 40 to 45 relative to the common plane.

The discussion to this point of FIGS. 1, 2 and 2a-2d assumes that each ofthe triangles -22 isa flat rigid or stiff triangle and that the seams, respectively, therebetween are hinged or are flexible such that, when the additional triangle 22 is held against a planar surface, the other triangles and the sides therebetween will naturally assume the positions and inclinations just described.

Turning now to FIGS. 3-6, it will be seen that I have shown how my geometric figure may be used as a building module, for instance, to construct a canopy tent 54, like reference numerals and letters referring to like parts. In FIG. 3, I show seven tent pegs or anchors 56, two tent ropes 58, 60 indicated by dotted lines, and four rods 62, 64, 66, 68. The rods are, of course, tent compression members while the tent ropes are tension members.

It will be appreciated that the structure of FIG. 3 is inverted or turned upside down relative to FIG. 2 in that the said additional triangle 22 defines an upper, horizontally extending surface of the canopy tent with the rest of the surfaces being at that level or below. Again, the common sides 40, 42, the center point X and the additional triangle 22 all lie in a common horizontal plane. The radially outer ends (from the point X) or distal ends of the common sides 44, 46, 48 are attached directly to the ground, for instance, by the tent pegs or anchors 56. The rods 62, 64 may extend from the outer end of the common sides 48 upwardly, respectively, to the outer ends of the common sides 42, 50. Similarly, the rods 66, 68 may extend upwardly, respectively, from the outer end of the common side 44 to the outer ends of the common sides 40, 52.

Then, the ropes 58, 60 may be used to hold the rods 62, 64 and 66, 68 spread apart as well as to hold the outer ends of the sides 42, 50 and 40, 52 to the ground as illustrated. The ropes 58, 60 hold the distal ends of the rods 62, 64 spaced apart and hold the rods 62, 64 away from the rods 66, 68.

It will be appreciated that the canopy tent shown in FIGS. 3-6 may be constructed from conventional and readily available flexible sheet material using conventional tent and awning fabrication techniques, i.e., cutting and sewing to provide the desired shapes. The material may be folded over and sewn, for instance, to provide tubes or sheaths for receiving the rods 62, 64, 66, 68. Eyelets for accommodating the tent pegs and ropes may be conventionally provided in the material.

Further, the canopy shown in FIG. 3 may be provided by connecting together seven equilateral triangles, each one of which may be formed from relatively stiff sheet stock such as, for instance, sheet metal or sheet plastic. Depending upon the stiffness of the material used, the ropes and rods shown in FIGS. 36 may be dispensed with because of the self-supporting nature of the stiff structure.

It will further be appreciated that, with the exception of the said additional triangle 22, a relatively inexpensive sheet metal structure can be obtained by forming each of the equilateral triangles 10-20 with one of its common sides having a downwardly turned flange and its other common side having an upwardly turned flange. The triangle 10, for instance, may be formed with its common side 52 having a downwardly turned flange and its common side 44 having an upwardly turned flange. The triangle 12, then, would have its common side 44 with an upwardly turned flange and its common side with a downwardly turned flange. The triangle 22 then would have both of its side flanges turned down. It will be appreciated that adjacent flanges may be conventionally fastened together by bolts or rivets. It will further be appreciated that several such geometric figures or modules may be connected together to form a much larger canopy structure, roof structure, wall structure or the like. The resultant structure, when several such modules are fastened together will have a basic triangular rhythmic character possessing some aspects of radial and bilateral symmetry as well as parallel and perpendicular edge qualities.

Two such geometric figures or building modules may be fastened together, for instance, by fastening the bases of their additional triangles 22 together to provide a double canopy tent. With such a structure, the two fastened together additional triangles 22 would provide a central horizontally extending plane surface or roof surface in the central portion of the combined canopies. Such a structure is shown diagrammatically in FIG. 3a. In addition to joining modules by joining similar edges or sides, one or more triangular planes of two modules may be disposed to coincide.

Turning first to FIGS. 8-10, I will discuss one form of a wreath which may be constructed using the geometric figure of my present invention, and particularly a form which may be constructed using relatively stiff but bendable sheet stock such as stiff paper, metal, plastic and the like. While FIG. 8 shows the completed wreath, FIGS. 9 and 10 show a section of the wreath including two such geometric figures or geometric modules and the manner in which I prefer to form the two connected figures from a sheet of flat stock material.

Each figure, of course, includes the seven equilateral triangles 1022 as shown by the reference numerals applied to FIGS. 9 and 10. No reference numerals have been applied to FIG. 8 in order not to detract from its beauty, but it will be understood that the wreath of FIG. 8 comprises ten of the structures of FIG. 9 connected together as described hereinafter.

FIG. 10 shows a sheet of material with two pieces A, B stamped or otherwise cut therefrom. Piece A includes tabs I-8 while piece B includes slits 1-8 for receiving the correspondingly numbered tabs. At each of its upper and lower ends, piece 8 has engageable slots 70, 72 which are to be brought together and engaged. Piece A has the illustrated slots 74, 76 which are usable with the longer tabs 3, 5 to connect the combined structure of FIG. 9 to the next such structure to form the wreath of FIG. 8. The piece A has the reduced connecting portion 76 which is placed at right angles to the centrally located reduced connecting portion 78 of piece B so that the tabs 1, 2 can be received, respectively, in the slits l, 2.

The structure of FIG. 9, therefore, is constructed by snapping out the two pieces A, B from the sheet in which they are formed. Preferably, a slight curve is created in the six diamond shapes by bending them upwardly until their opposite tips touch. Then the piece A is placed on top of the piece B with the portion 76 extending at right angles across the portion 78. Then,

tabs 1, 2, 3 and 4 are inserted into their respective slots 1, 2, 3, 4. Then, the ends of the piece B are joined by engaging the slots 70, 72. Then, tabs 5, 6, 7 and 8 are inserted into their respective slits to finish the FIG. 9 structure. Ten such units are completed in the manner just described to form the wreath of FIG. 8.

The assembly of the units is accomplished as follows: Each piece A is provided with a locating square 80 and a locating circle 82 as illustrated. The two squares 80 of adjacent units are located and placed in a face-toface relationship so that the tabs 3 adjacent the squares can be inserted into the slots 76 of the adjacent unit. Then the location circles 82 are placed in a face-to-face relationship so that the tabs 5 adjacent thereto can be placed in the slots 74 of the units. That process is completed until all ten units have been joined in a circle to provide a wreath.

FIG. 7, then, shows a wreath similar to the wreath of FIG. 8 except that it is formed from twenty such geometric figures or modules with the seven equilateral triangles of each module being stiff and planar. It will be appreciated that the wreath of FIG. 8 is constructed such that the equilateral triangles of the modules forming the wreath are stressed to provide curvatures. The rigid modules or stiff modules of the wreath of FIG. 7 may be adhesively fastened or otherwise fastened together to simulate the FIG. 9 structure and the FIG. 8 structure.

I claim:

1. A geometric building module comprising seven equal sized equilateral triangles joined together so that one corner point of each triangle meets at a common center point with corner points of the other six triangles, each triangle having two sides extending out wardly from said center'point and a base connecting and distal ends of its two sides, each side of each triangle coinciding with the adjacent side of the adjacent triangle, one of said triangles defining a common plane including said common center point, each of said other triangles having one of its sides lying in said common plane and the other of its sides inclining away from one side of said common plane.

2. The invention of claim 1 in which said common plane is a generally horizontal plane and said other sides of said other triangles incline downwardly from said common plane, and another substantially identical module joined to said first recited module to form a shelter, the said one triangle of said modules being joined together with their bases coinciding and with the said one triangle of said second recited module also lying in said common plane,

3. The invention of claim 1 in which said module is formed from flexible sheet material, said common plane being a horizontally extending plane, and said other sides of said other triangles inclining downwardly from said plane, and including rigid rods extending along and defining the bases of at least some of said other triangles and ropes for holding said sheet material in tension.

4. A wreath comprising a plurality of geometric building modules connected together in pairs with the pairs being connected together to form a closed circle, each module comprising seven equal sized equilateral triangles joined together so that one corner point of each triangle meets at a common center point with corner points of the other six triangles, each triangle having two sides extending outwardly from said center point and a base connecting the distal ends of its two sides, each side of each triangle coinciding with the adjacent side of the adjacent triangle, one of said triangles defining a common plane including said common center point, each of said other triangles having one of its sides lying in said common plane and the other of its sides inclining away from one side of said common plane, the modules of each pair being connected together at their corresponding distal ends of their said other sides.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION PATENT NO. 3,868,295 DATED February 25, 1975 INVENTORt'S) Garret J. Boone, Jr.

It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below: I

Column 1, line 16, "work" should be word Column 5, line 36, (Claim 1, line 7) "and" should be the Signed and sealed this 27th day of May 1975.

SEAL) Attest:

C. MARSHALL DANN RUTH C. MASON Commissioner of Patents Attesting Officer and Trademarks

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1997022 *Apr 27, 1933Apr 9, 1935Ralph M StalkerAdvertising medium or toy
US2633657 *Apr 19, 1950Apr 7, 1953Jr William T WarrenDecorative ornament and a blank from which it is made
US3016115 *Aug 13, 1958Jan 9, 1962Holland Jr Ayler JPortable shelter
US3255556 *Feb 14, 1963Jun 14, 1966Electronic Space Structures CoPanel and spherical structure
US3302321 *Aug 16, 1963Feb 7, 1967Wallace G WalkerFoldable structure
US3708910 *Nov 5, 1970Jan 9, 1973J SkillmanMethod of stacking nesting articles of diminishing size
US3757430 *Apr 18, 1972Sep 11, 1973Bride R MacFlexible module
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4133149 *Oct 31, 1977Jan 9, 1979Angress Percy GFoldable portable shelter
US5253799 *Sep 20, 1990Oct 19, 1993Sebesta Edward HHidden locking tab and slotted flap system for multi-sided packages
US8096082 *Feb 23, 2010Jan 17, 2012Gabriella Veronica MoranPortable changing room that is inflatable
US20110203189 *Feb 23, 2010Aug 25, 2011Gabriella Veronica MoranPortable Changing Room that is Inflatable
USD752245 *Apr 30, 2014Mar 22, 2016Daniel Richard KlemerRoof constructed of triangular panels
EP1138841A1 *Mar 28, 2001Oct 4, 2001van Zeist, JohnCovering structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/10, 428/9, 52/82, 428/542.2, 52/DIG.100
International ClassificationE04B7/10, E04B1/32
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2001/3294, E04B7/107, E04B1/32, Y10S52/10, E04B2001/3276
European ClassificationE04B7/10D, E04B1/32