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Publication numberUS3869265 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 4, 1975
Filing dateJul 10, 1972
Priority dateJul 10, 1972
Also published asDE2333437A1
Publication numberUS 3869265 A, US 3869265A, US-A-3869265, US3869265 A, US3869265A
InventorsElmer Eugene Bruning, Eugene B Szymczak, Gilbert R Wolter
Original AssigneeSunbeam Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Canister type vacuum cleaner
US 3869265 A
Abstract
An improved canister-type vacuum cleaner is disclosed which has a front cap, a rear cap an elongated tank which houses the motor and a tool holding and handle assembly that is mounted on top of the elongated tank. The front cap is provided with a vacuum control mechanism, an efficiency indicator and a hose release control. The rear cap houses a cord reel and an on/off switch which may be manipulated by the toe of the operator. The front end of the vacuum cleaner is supported by a single castor or wheel which is held in place by mounting members which also form a hinge so that the front cap can be opened when the disposable dust bag must be changed.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Wolter et a1. Mar. 4, 1975 CANISTER TYPE VACUUM CLEANER 3,636,681 1/1972 B81501] et a1. 55/372 ,745.96 7 2 Inventors: Gilbert Whiter, Elmhurst; Eugene 1 3226.82; 15/ 3 2 3 B. Szymczak, Chicago; Elmer Eugene Bruning, NOrmaL all Of "1 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS I '1 1 1 Assignee= Sunbeam Corporation, Chicago, 63133152 211323 fiii fi fi l 'lIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 12135.3 [22] Filed: July 10, 1972 Primary Examiner-Bernard Nozick [21] Appl' 270421 Attorney, Agent, or FirmGeorge R. Clark; Neil M.

Rose; Clifford A. Dean [52] U.S. Cl. 55/274, 15/323. 15/327 E,

55/357, 55/472 [57] ABSTRACT [51] Int. Cl. 301d 46/02 An improved canister type vacuum cleaner is [58] Field of Search 55/274, 357, 372, 378, Closed which has a from Cap, a rear Cap an elongated 55/379, 418, 471-473, 485; 15/327 E, tank which houses the motor and a tool holding and 417/423 A; 137/166-1681 170 handle assembly that is mounted-on top of the elongated tank. The front cap is provided with a vacuum 156] References C'ted control mechanism, an efficiency indicator and a hose UNITED STATES PATENTS release control. The rear cap houses a cord reel and 2.655.894 10/1953 Rabbitt 55/274 an On/off Switch which y be manipulated y the I08 2.997.728 8/1961 Gaudry 15/323 of the operator. The front end of the vacuum cleaner 3.021.028 2/1962 Descurries.... 15/327 E is supported by a single castor or wheel which is held 3.055.161 9/1962 hallstrom 55/356 in place by mgunting members which also form a gallsFrom 1 31 hinge so that the front cap can be opened when the UZZICI' K 3.619.850 11/1971 Rideout et a1. disposable dust bag must be changed 3.633.239 1/1972 Meyerhoefer .L 15/327 R 10 Claims, 11 Drawing Figures PATENTED 41975 3,869,265

saw u [5 23 I CANISTER TYPE VACUUM CLEANER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to canister-type or tank-type vacuum cleaners and more specifically to a canister-type vacuum cleaner which includes improved front cap and rear cap construction, improved housing construction including improved bumper design, and integrated front castor or wheel support and front cap hinge provisions.

The vacuum cleaner of the present invention is designed to incorporate a number of desirable features into a simple and efficient design. The various construction features that are provided for the front cap, the rear cap, the tool housing and handle assembly and the front castor or wheel support andfront cap hinge all contribute to an improved canister-type vacuum cleaner. In addition, the vacuum cleaner of the present invention was designed with the objective of incorporating a number of features which will be desirable to the public including: (1) easily accessible tool and accessory storage provisions, (2) convenient wand storage, (3) a wheelabout feature which allows for easy handling of the vacuum cleaner by the operator, (4) precise m ulti-position suction control provisions so that adjustment of the suction developed by the vacuum cleaner may be obtained for various types of materials, a reliable but inexpensive efficiency indicator, (6) simple dust bag loading, (7) a top-exiting cord reel in the rear cap, (8) large rear wheels for easy movability, (9) an on/off switch that is mounted for easy access and l0) convenient hose storage. In order to provide the above-noted improvements and features in a canistertypc cleaner having high performance efficiency, a number of innovative provisions are incorporated into the design of the vacuum cleaner of the present invention as will be described in connecton with the drawings.

It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide an improved canister type vacuum cleaner having improved front and rear caps construction with improved cord reel, efficiency indicating and suction control features that are incorporated into the front and rear caps.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide improved housing construction including improved bumper design.

It is an additional object of the present invention to provide relatively low cost front castor or wheel support mounting members which also form a hinge for the front cap so that the front cap may be opened when the dust bag must be replaced.

Other objects and advantages of the vacuum cleaner of the present invention will be apparent from this specification.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the canister-type vacuum cleaner of the present invention which shows a number of vacuum cleaner tools and accessories in their storage positions on the cleaner;

FIG. 2 is a longitudinal cross sectional view of the vacuum cleaner of the present invention that is taken along the cutting line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a cross sectional view looking into the interior of the vacuum cleaner tank that is taken along the lines 33 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a partial plan view of the front end cap which shows the suction control mechanism and efficiency indicator;

FIG. 5 is a cross sectional view of a portion of the front end cap and a portion of the housing of the cleaner in the vicinity of the efficiency indicator which is taken along the line 55 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a cross sectional view of a portion of the front cap which shows the suction control mechanism and a portion of the adjacent housing which is taken along the line 66 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is a partial cross sectional view of the suction control mechanism which is taken along the line 7-7 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 8 is another partial cross sectional view of the suction control mechanism which is taken along the line 8-8 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 9 is a partial cross sectional view taken along the line 9-9 of FIG. 1 through the plastic bumper which runs in a longitudinal direction along the canister tank;

FIG. 10 is a cross sectional view of the front castor or wheel support and front cap construction which is taken along the line I0-10 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 11 is a partial cross sectional view of the front castor or wheel support and front end cap hinge members which is taken along the line 1I-Il of FIG. 10.

TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION The vacuum cleaner of the present invention which is shown in FIG. 1 is designated by the general reference number 20. The vacuum cleaner 20 has a front cap 22 and a rear cap 24 which enclose the ends of the elongated canister tank 26. The tank 26 is constructed of two steel shells and soft plastic bumpers 28, which are preferably extruded of polyvinyl chloride, are mounted on the sides of the tank 26 where the two shells meet to protect furniture. Mounted on the top surface 30 of the tank 26 is a tool holding and handle assembly 32 and a hose holding wall section 33. The front cap 22, the rear cap 24 and the tool holding and handle assembly 32 and the hose: holding wall section 33 are all formed of plastic, preferably of a high impact polystyrene.

The tool holding and handle assembly 32 consists of a number of upwardly projecting tool holding posts 34, 36, 38 and 40 (shown in FIG. 2) which support the various tools and accessories which may be used with the vacuum cleaner such as the wall and floor brush assembly 42, the upholstery tool 44, the crevice the tool 46 and the dusting brush 48, respectively. In addition, two metallic wands 50 and 52 may be stored in elongated storage channels 54 and 56 in the rear cap 24, respectively. The operator may then control the movement of the vacuum cleaner 20 without stooping by grasping one or both the wands 50 and 52 so as to direct the vacuum cleaner 20 in the desired direction. If desired, the wands 50 and 52 may be connected to each other, and in this manner a convenient handle which projects upwardly from the floor an even greater distance may be provided. A slight pressure downward on the wands 50 and 52 when they are in the channels 54 and 56 will cause the rear end of the elongated tank 26 to rotate about the rear axle 218 down toward the floor thereby lifting the front end and the castor from the floor so as to make it easier to wheel the vacuum cleaner of the present invention around a home, as is apparent by reference to FIGS. 1 and 2.

The tool holding and handle assembly 32 also comprises a handle 58 so that the entire vacuum cleaner may be lifted by the handle if desired. The hose holding wall section 33 is constructed with a pair of elongated side walls 60 and 62 which slant slightly outwardly and a pair of semi-cylindrical walls 64 and 66 on the opposite ends of the section 33.

The flexible hose assembly 72, which is coupled to the intake of the vacuum cleaner in FIG. 1, is formed of three parts and may be stored in the hose holding section 33 by wrapping it around the walls 64 and 66 and inside of the side walls 60 and 62. The parts of the hose assembly 72 consist of the flexible hose 74, the plastic coupling member 76 which is inserted into the intake opening 78 on the front cap 22 and the tube 84. The hose 74 is held in place by the locking control member 80 which is formed with a semicircular lower surface 82, shown in FIG. 2, which engages a corresponding groove (not shown) on the coupling member 76. When it is desired to remove the hose assembly 72 from the intake aperture aperture 78, the locking control member 80 is raised thereby raising the surface 82 out of the groove on the coupling member 76. The chromium plated curved tube 84 is coupled to the flexible hose 74 by means of a plastic coupling member 86. The curved tube 84 is provided with a stainless steel detent button 87 which resiliently projects into a corresponding aperture on either of the extension wands 50 and 52 when it is mounted on the curved tube 84. Accessory tools also may be affixed to the curved tube using this detent for retention.

The front cap 22 includes a five position suction control mechanism which includes a sliding bleed valve 88 which may be adjusted so that the suction of the vac uum cleaner may be varied over a large range and the vacuum cleaner may be used under widely different conditions. An air bypass path is provided though the suction control mechanism so that when adjustments of the bleed valve 88 are made they will not be altered substantially by the contents of the bag or by the air resistance of the bag itself.

The front cap 22 also contains an efficiency indicator 90 which is a rubber dome or diaphragm the inside of which is presented to the suction side of the vacuum cleaner. The indicator 90 is constructed of natural rubber, and it will collapse sharply so that it turns itself inside out when the vacuum inside the tank is raised to a high enough level by either a full bag or by a clogging of the tools or wands that are used. Natural rubber or silicone rubber are preferred for the indicator 90 to provide the necessary durability. The indicator 90 will subsequently be described in more detail.

The front cap 22 may be opened to allow for replacement of dust bags when the efficiency indicator shows that the dust bag is full. A latch 92 on the upper surface 30 of the tank 26 has a downwardly protruding finger 94 that engages the ledge 96 on the top of the front cap 22. When the latch 92 is pulled up the engagement of the finger 94 on the ledge 96 is released and the front cap may be swung downwardly thereby allowing the dust bag to be removed.

The rear end cap 24 houses a cord reel 102 with a plug 104 and a power cord which extends upwardly through agrommet member 106 in the upper surface 108 of the rear end cap 24. The upwardly extending plug 104 eliminates a particularly annoying feature of many cord reel vacuum cleaners which is caused by a tendency of the operator to pull the vacuum cleaner around when the cord is being extended. Since the pulling force on the plug 104 is in a vertical direction, the weight of the vacuum cleaner 20 tends to oppose the pulling force and the vacuum cleaner will not be pulled from its position by the operator.

A large front swivel castor 110 is employed to allow for effortless movability of the cleaner. A pair of large wide track rear wheels 112 which are preferably made of high impact polystyrene and which have polyvinyl chloride tires 114 are used to provide for easy rolling over either high or low pile carpets. The wheels 112 are, therefore, quiet and non-marring when they roll over bare floors.

FIG. 2 is a cross sectional view of the vacuum cleaner 20 which is taken along line 2-2 of FIG. 1 which shows the construction details of the major components of the vacuum cleaner. The vacuum cleaner 20 has a front chamber 118 and a rear chamber 188 which is separated from the front chamber 118 by the metal partition 190. The dust bag basket 116 is located in the front chamber 118 and it preferably is constructed of high impact styrene. The basket 116 has a number of longitudinal bars 120 and transverse bars 122 of somewhat wider dimensions than the longitudinal bars 120. This construction provides a number of rectangular shaped openings 124 which permit the flow of air therethrough. The front end 126 of the basket 116 is of slightly larger dimensions than is the rear end 128. At the rear end 128 of the tapering basket 116 is a cylindrically shaped open-ended shell 130 which extends rearwardly and receives the impeller housing 132 ofthe motor 134. The rear face 136 of the cylindrical shell 130 is formed with a number of apertures 138 of a general trapezoidal shape which permit the flow of air therethrough. The apertures 138 surround the circular central aperture 140 and they are formed by the radially extending ribs 142 which extend from the central ring 144, as best shown in FIG. 3. A polyurethane foam filter 146 is secured in place over the face 136 by the inwardly extending tabs 148.

The forward end 126 of the basket 116 is formed with the rearwardly directed bifurcated locking members 150 and 152 on the top and the bottom of the basket 116, respectively. An indentation 154 is formed in the upper wall 56 of the tank 26 which receives a pair of locking edges 158 on the ends of the locking member 152. Similarly, an indentation 160 is formed in the bottom wall 162 of the tank 26 which receives a pair of downwardly extending locking edges 164 on the end of the locking member 150. The locking members 150 and 152 are resilient and when the basket is pulled forward they flex sufficiently to remove the edges 158 and 164 from the indentations I54 and 160, respectively so that the basket 116 can be removed from the tank 26. Viewing the basket in FIG. 3, it is seen that the basket also has a pair of laterally extending wings 166 and 168 which extend into corresponding notch-like openings 170 and 172 that are provided in the forward edges of the side walls 174 and 176, respectively, of the tank 26 which also assist in holding the basket 116 in place in the tank 26.

One type of dust bag 178 which may be used in the vacuum cleaner of the described embodiment has a relatively stiff support card 180 which has a central aperture 181. The aperture 181 is surrounded by a resilient sealing member 182 which thereby forms a tight seal with the hose inlet tube 184. The hose inlet tube 184 is in communication with a somewhat larger aperture 186 into which the coupling member 76 of the hose assembly 72 is inserted and is locked into place by the locking control member 80 in a manner previously described.

The electric motor 134 is housed in the rear chamber 188 which is separated from the front chamber 118 by the metal partition Wall 190. The motor 134 and the impeller section 132, which is driven by the motor 134, are secured to the partition Wall 190 by means of screws 192 and 194 which are provided with lock washers 196 and 198, respectively. The bulk of the weight of the motor 134 and the impeller 132 is located forward of the axle 218, as shown in FIG. 2. The interconnection leads 200 for the motor 134 are connected together by conventional crimp-type insulated terminals 202. The panel 190 is secured to the bottom wall 162 of the tank 26 by means of a pair of screws 204, and it is secured to the top wall 156 by means of the screw 206. The screw 206 also serve to hold the tool holding and handle assembly 32 and the hose holding wall section 33 in place on top of the tank 46 along with the screws 207 and 208. The tool holding and handle as sembly 32 and the wall section 33 may thus be separately removed, as shown in FIG. 2. The wall section 33 thus need not be installed on lower priced models, if desired.

The rear cap 24, which houses the cord reel 102, is secured to the rear end of the tank 26 by means of a pair of screws 210 which extend through the bottom wall 162d and a pair of screws 212 which extend through the top wall 156. As is best shown in FIG. 3, a pair of plastic axle support members 214 and 216 are integrally formed with the rear cap 24 for supporting the rear axle 218 of the wheels 112. The rear cap 24 may he removed by unscrewing the screws 210 and 212 and by disconnection of the leads 200.

A polyurethane foam filter 220 is positioned against the forward face 222 of the cord reel 102 which has an axis of rotation that passes substantially through the center of the aperture 140 of the basket 116 and extends in the elongated direction of the tank 26, as can be seen by reference to FIG. 2. The cord reel 102 is formed with a number of apertures (not shown) which provide for passage of the air that flows through the filter 220 through the cord reel 102 also so that it can be discharged from the rear end of the vacuum cleaner. A fibre barrier plate 224 having a number of relatively small apertures therein is positioned forwardly of the foam filter 220. The barrier plate 224 assists in securing the foam filter 220 in place and it also has at least one relatively large aperture 226 which allows for passage of the electric leads 200 therethrough. The dimensions of the barrier plate 224 are such that is is wedged into place against the mounting brackets 228 and 230 which are formed on the cord reel 102 and which are secured into place by means of the screws 210 and 212, respectively. The polyurethane foam filter thereby prevents the discharge of any fine particles of dust or dirt into the room being cleaned.

For quick and easy bag changing, the front cap 22 can be opened by releasing the latch 92 and by pulling the top of the front cap 22 downwardly. The flat dust bag 178 which fits into the basket 116 is a self-opening bag. It is placed in the retaining rim 231 when the front cap 22 is closed. The shape of the dust bag cardboard front plate 180 provides a means for determining the correct dust bag position when replacement is necessary. The air pressure which results when the machine is turned on fluffs the bag to a generally rectangular shape thereby allowing for utilization of substantially all of the capacity of the basket 116.

The soft polyvinylchloride bumpers 28 are secured to the tank 26 in the manner shown in FIG. 9. The front end cap 22 also has a pair of removable bumper sections 98 which generally define forward extensions of the bumpers 28, which extensions are preferably formed of polyvinylchloride. The rear cap 24 also has a pair of bumper extensions 100 but these are integrally molded with the cap 24.

The steel tank 26 is formed ofa top housing shell 232 and a bottom housing shell 234. The top housing shell 232 is formed with an outwardly extending flange 236 which runs lengthwise along the tank 26 and which has an upturned edge 238 at its end, as shown in FIG. 9. Similarly, the bottom housing shell 234 has an outwardly extending flange 240 which runs lengthwise along the tank 26 and which has downwardly extending end 242. The flanges 236 and 240 and the ends 238 and 242 thus form a T-shaped member which holds the bumper 28 in place along the side of the tank 26, as shown in FIG. 9. The flanges 236 and 240 are in abutting relationship, and they are secured together by means of a shear tab 244, or other suitable securing means which engage rectangular openings in shell and are clinched.

The polyvinylchloride bumper 28 which extends along the entire portion of the tank 26 and fits over the flanges 236 and 240 is formed with a pair of arms 246 and 248 which slant at an acute angle with respect to the horizontal flanges 236 and 240 which abut against the walls 174 of the tank 26. The bumper also has a pair of diagonally positioned arms 250 and 252 which contact the walls 174 at the bend points 254 of the flanges 236 and 240. In addition to this, the bumper 28 has a downwardly extending arm 253 which engages the upper surface of the flange 2.36 at a point between the top of the shear tab 244 and the upwardly extend ing edge 238 of the flange 236. The bumper 28 also has an upwardly extending arm 255 which engages the lower surface of the flange 240 at a point between the bottom of the shear tab 244 and the downwardly extending edge 242. In this manner the bumper 28 is secured to the tank 26 in a manner which provides for resilient action of the bumper and which also provides for easy assembly of the tank 26. Plastic end caps 249 and 251 FIGS. 1 and 3) are secured over the forward flange 236 and 240 edges of the walls 176 and 174, respectively, to cover the forward ends of bumpers 28 to improve the appearance of the cleaner.

In order that the vacuum cleaner 20 may be wheeled about easily by the user, a pair of upwardly extending storage channels 54 and 56 are provided in the rear end of the rear cap 24. The channels 54 and 56 are positioned rearward of the axle 218. The rear face 254 of the rear cap 24 has a number of rectangular shaped apertures 256 therein to allow for the diffusion of the exhausted air from the vacuum cleaner which passes through the hose assembly 72, the hose inlet 184, the dust bag 178, the impeller 132, the motor 134, the front filter 146, the rear filter 220, the cord reel I02 and the storage channels 54 and 56. The apertures 256 in the rear face 255 and the storage channels 54 and 56 act to disperse or diffuse the exhaust air that is passed through the filter 220 and the apertured cord reel 102 so that there is no single exhaust stream of heated air, thereby eliminating a direct blast of hot air from the cleaner which could be very annoying to the operator and could result in blowing debris from the floor into the air.

The suction control mechanism 88 from the cleaner is located in the upper portion of the front cap 22 as shown in FIG. 4. A box-like console enclosure 257 is secured to the slanted wall 258 of the front cap 22 by means of the screws 260 and 262. The suction control mechanism 88 is adjustable to five different suction positions for operation under varying conditions. The five positions are marked on a label 264 which is secured to the front face of the console enclosure 257. The bleed valve 88 is slideable back and forth in the direction parallel to the front surface 266 of the console panel 267. The bleed valve 88 has outwardly extending lever 268 which may be by the operator and moved into alignment with the numerals 270 which are printed on the label 264. The descriptive information corresponding to the settings one through five is found just to the left of the opening 274 which receives the bleed valve 88.

When the lever 268 is in alignment with numeral 1, the minimum amount of suction is achieved, and this position is suitable for the cleaning of materials such as lace and the like. The reduction in suction is achieved by bypassing some of the air that is drawn through the openings 274 and 282 to the channel 276 (FIG. 7) which is provided between the wall 278 and-the closure plate 280 of bleed valve 88 in accordance with position of the bleed valve 88. The air flows through the opening 282 and bypasses the dust bag 178 by flowing between the dust bag basket 116 and the interior of the cleaner housing. When the bleed valve 88 is moved to the right so that the lever 268 is in alignment with successively higher numbers an increased amount of suction is produced at the end of hose 72. The sizes of the vents to openings 274 and 282 become successively smaller as the lever 268 is aligned with successively higher numbers. When the lever is aligned with the number five the openings 274 and 282 will be closed off and the amount of vacuum that is produced, therefore, will be at a maximum.

Each of the five positions of the bleed valve 88 are located by detent provisions which consist of the projection 284 on the wall 285 of bleed valve 88 and five indentations 286 that are formed in the wall 278. Each of the indentations 286 serves to locate the sliding control member 264 at one of the five numbered locations in accordance with the desired amount of suction. The wall 285 forms one wall of the box-like enclosure 288 which s opened at the end 289. An integrally molded, or a separate resilient pad, 290 bears against the surface 258 to provide some resiliency, which allows for smooth positioning of the bleed valve 88. The console enclosure 257 is formed with a guide wall 292 which confines the bleed valve 88 so that it slides back and forth between the guide wall 292 and the lower wall 294 of the enclosure 257.

The efficiency indicator 90, shown in FIG. 5, is a natural rubber piece which is formed with a sealing ring 296, the upper surface of which abuts the lower surface of the rim 298 and the lower surface of which abuts against the wall 258 thereby forming a tight seal. The

body of the indicator then extends upwardly with a slightly reduced diameter portion 300 and with a still smaller dome portion 302. A single small aperture 304 located in the wall 258 provides for communication of the interior of the indicator 90 with the interior of the tank 26. When the bag is full, or the hose, wands, or tools are clogged, the indicator 90 is constructed so that the dome portion 302 of the indicator will invert itself and be drawn inward, thereby indicating that the bag should be replaced, or that hose or tools should be cleaned. Inversion of the dome 302 is a result ofa pressure differential, (between ambient and the cleaner interior), generated by a clogged condition.

The front cap 22 of the vacuum cleaner 20 swings down when the latch 92 is released so that the dust bag 178 may be removed when it is filled and replaced with another bag. The entire front cap 22 pivots around the axle 310 which is shown in FIGS. 2, l0 and 11. The construction of the pivot assembly of the present vacuum cleaner provides for a relatively low cost combined hinge and castor wheel mounting assembly. The outer ends of the 310 metallic axle are received in a pair of forwardly-facing open plastic axle support members 312 and 314 which are integrally formed with the front cap 22. Intermediate the two axle support members 312 and 314 is box-like structure 316 which is also integrally formed with the front cap 24 and is opened at the bottom and has a number of support ribs 318. The box-like structure 316 is provided to hold the generally rectangular castor support plate 320. The castor support plate 320 supports the castor shaft 322. A plastic sleeve 324 (shown in FIG. 3) is inserted over the shaft 322 to provide a low friction surface between the shaft 322 and the boss 326 on the castor which snugly fits over the plastic sleeve 324 so that the castor 110 may revolve about the shaft 322.

The metallic bracket 328 is riveted to the lower wall 172 of the tank 26 by means of the rivets 330 and 332. The bracket 328 has a pair of substantially closed metallic bearing and axle support sleeves 331 and 333 which substantially encircle the hinge axle 310 to provide increased support for the castor 110 and the front cap 22 when it is pivoted about the axle 310. The castor support plate 320 is inserted from the rear into the slots 342 and 344 which extend along the side edges of the box-like structure 316 until it abuts against the front wall 346 of the box-like structure 316. The castor support plate 320 is bent downwardly along the lines 338 and 340 to allow the front cap to swing freely about the hinge axle 310 and the edge of the support plate 320 abuts against the outer surfaces of the sleeves 331, and 333, thereby securing the castor support plate 320 in place.

When the front cap 22 is positioned in its closed position, with the finger 94 of the latch 92 in engagement with the ledge 96 of the front cap 22, the resilient sealing member 306, which extends around the inside periphery of the rim 352 of the front cap 22 provides a seal which prevents leakage between the front cap 22 and the tank 26.

Although a particular embodiment of the present invention has been described, it is not intended that the present invention be limited to the particular embodiment illustrated herein since variations and modifications thereof will be apparent within the scope of the present invention to those skilled in the art.

What is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A canister-type vacuum cleaner comprising an elongated tank open at both ends, a pivotally operable front cap closing off the front end of said tank and having an inlet aperture for receiving an inlet hose and hose release means for releasably securing said hose in said inlet aperture, hinge means mounted on said tank and said front cap and supporting a hinge axle which allows said front cap to be pivotally swung open about said hinge axle when a new dust bag is to be inserted into the vacuum cleaner, latch means for securing said front cap over the front end of said tank during operation of the vacuum cleaner, a rear cap having air outlet means mounted on the open rear end of said tank, a dust bag holder supported in the forward end of said tank, an electric motor mounted in said tank to the rear of said dust bag holder, a power cord operably connected for supplying electrical power to said motor, suction-producing means operably connected to be driven by said motor whereby to produce a suction at said hose inlet, said front cap having a sloped surface on the upper portion of said front cap, efficiencyindicating means mounted on said slope surface, said efficiency-indicating means comprising a resilient dome which extends outwardly from said sloped surface, the interior of said dome being in communication with the interior of said tank, said dome being constructed such that is assumes an inverted position when the pressure differential between the interior of said tank and the ambient pressure on the outer surface of said dome exceeds a predetermined amount whereby to indicate a full dust bag or a clogged inlet hose, and adjustable suction-controlling means associated with a vent aperture located in said sloped surface adjacent to said efficiency indicator, said suction-controlling means comprising adjustable vent aperture closure means for achieving said suction control by closing off predetermined portions of said vent aperture in accordance with the adjusted position of said vent aperture closure means.

2. A vacuum cleaner as set forth in claim 1 wherein said suction-controlling means further comprises detent means for precisely locating said adjustable vent aperture closure means at each of a plurality of positions in accordance with the amount of closure of said vent aperture that is desired.

3. A canister-type vacuum cleaner comprising an elongated tank, a front cap closing off the front end of said tank and having an inlet aperture for receiving an inlet hose and hose release means for releasably securing said hose in said inlet aperture, means hingedly mounting said front cap on said tank whereby said front cap may be pivotally swung open when a new dust bag is to be inserted into the vacuum cleaner, latch means for securing said front cap over the front end of said tank during operation of the vacuum cleaner, a rear cap closing off the rear end of said tank, and having air outlet means, a dust bag holder mounted in the forward end of said tank, an electric motor mounted in said tank to the rear of said dust bag holder, a power cord for supplying electrical power to said motor, suctionproducing means in said tank and adapted to be driven by said motor, means secured to said vacuum cleaner for providing for movability of said vacuum cleaner while it is in contact with the floor, said tank being formed of an upper shell and a lower shell, said upper and lower shells having respectively a pair of integrally formed lower flanges and a pair of integrally formed upper flanges which run for substantially the length of said tank in the direction of the elongated dimension of said tank, each of said upper flanges extending substantially horizontally outwardly on opposite sides of said tank in abutting relationship with one of said lower flanges, which also extend substantially horizontally outwardly on opposite sides of :said tank, the outer edges of said upper and lower flanges being bent downwardly and upwardly, respectively, and a pair of elongated removable resilient bumpers, each of said bumpers being recessed in a manner to receive one set of abutting upper and lower flanges including the bent edges thereof whereby said bumpers are mounted on and substantiallycover said flanges along substantially the length thereof.

4. A vacuum cleaner as set forth in claim 3 wherein said front and rear caps are provided with bumper extensions to lengthen the effective lengths of said bumpers.

5. A vacuum cleaner as set forth in claim 4 wherein said front cap is provided with a pair of resilient removable bumper extensions.

6. A vacuum cleaner as set forth in claim 4 wherein said rear cap is provided with a pair of integrally molded bumper extensions.

7. A canistertype vacuum cleaner comprising an elongated tank, a front cap for closing off the front end of said tank having an inlet aperture for receiving an inlet hose and hose release means for releasably securing said hose in said inlet aperture, hinge means comprising a hinge axle which allows said front cap to be pivotally swung open about said hinge axle when a new dust bag is to be inserted into the vacuum cleaner, latch means for securing said front cap over the front end of said tank during operation of the vacuum cleaner, a rear cap for closing off the rear end of said tank, a dust bag holder located in the forward end of said tank, an electric motor located to the rear of said dust bag holder, a power cord for supplying electrical power to said motor, and suction-producing means driven by said motor, first hinge axle support means secured to said tank at the bottom of said tank for supporting said hinge axle, means secured to said vacuum cleaner for provding for movability of said vacuum cleaner while it is in contact with the floor, said means for providing movability consisting of a pair of rear wheels and a sin gle front means, said front means comprising a motiontransmitting means in contact with the floor, an upwardly extending shaft from said front means and a substantially horizontal plate secured to the upper end of said shaft, said front cap having integrally formed pair of second axle support means each constructed to support one end of said hinge axle, said first axle support means being positioned intermediate said ends of said hinge axle and intermediate said pair of second axle support means, said front cap also having an integrally formed box-like structure positioned intermediate the ends of said hinge axle and having a front wall and a pair of grooved side walls and an open rear end, said plate being positioned into said grooves in said side walls of said box-like structure from the rear with the forward edge of said plate being in abutment with the front wall of said boxlike structure, and the rear edge of said plate being in abutment with said first hinge axle support means and being shaped so that said front cap may be freely pivotally swung downwardly about said hinge axle when said latch means is released in order that the dust bag in said vacuum cleaner may be replaced when necessary and so that said plate is securely locked into place in said box-like structure.

8. A vacuum cleaner as set forth in claim 7 wherein said front means comprises a castor means which is revolveable about said shaft.

9. A vacuum cleaner as set forth in claim 7 wherein volveable about said shaft.

Patent Citations
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Classifications
U.S. Classification15/327.2, 55/357, 96/421, 15/323, 55/472
International ClassificationA47L9/10, A47L9/00, A47L9/19
Cooperative ClassificationA47L9/0027, A47L9/0009, A47L9/19
European ClassificationA47L9/19, A47L9/00B, A47L9/00B2B