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Publication numberUS3869761 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 11, 1975
Filing dateOct 29, 1973
Priority dateOct 29, 1973
Also published asDE2450699A1, DE2450699C2
Publication numberUS 3869761 A, US 3869761A, US-A-3869761, US3869761 A, US3869761A
InventorsCharles H Schaar
Original AssigneeColgate Palmolive Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Disposable diaper
US 3869761 A
Abstract
A diaper fastener for securing a diaper to an infant comprising a primary web having a first web portion secured to a first diaper portion, a second web portion securable to a second diaper portion, and a reduced strength region of the web intermediate those first and second portions. A reinforcing web is provided and is removably secured to the primary web in a location on the first web portion and in a location on the second web portion.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Schaar 1 Mar. 11, 1975 [54] DISPOSABLE DIAPER 2,902,734 9/1959 Walters 161/406 H S h L 3,501,365 3/1970 [75] lnventor. Charles c aar, ake ZUl'lCh, 111. 3,620,217 H971 73 Assignee; Co|gate pa|mo]ive Company, New 3,800,796 4/1974 Jacob 128/284 York P E P 1 R 011' rimary xammer au 1 ram [22] Filed 1973 Assistant Examiner-Kenneth J. Dorner [21] Appl. No.: 410,692

[57] ABSTRACT [52] 1U.S. Cl. 24/73 VA, 24/DIG. 11, 128/284, A diaper fastener for securing a diaper to an infant 161/112, 161/117, 161/167, 161/406, 161/410 Comprising a primary web having a first web portion [51] 1m. (:1 A441) 21/00, 1332b 3/10 secured t a fi diaper p a nd web p rti n [58] Field of Search 24/DIG, 11, 73 VA, 17 R; securable to a second diaper portion, and a reduced 128/284; 1 17/122 P, 122 PF, 68.5, 76 A; strength region of the web intermediate those first and 161/406, 410, 167, 112, 117 second portions. A reinforcing web is provided and is removably secured to the primary web in a location on [56] References Cited the first web portion and in a location on the second web portion.

9 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures 1 DISPOSABLE DIAPER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to the securing of diapers to infants.

In recent years, and especially with regard to disposable diapers, various techniques (most commonly, tape units) have attained wide usage as a replacement for the conventional safety pins as the means for securing a diaper to an infant. While it is generally agreed that such tape units greatly facilitate, as compared to safety pins, the securing of a diaper to an infant, the removal of a soiled diaper is another matter. Typically, the tapes employed must have enough structural integrity and resistance to tearing that the danger of the diaper coming loose on the infant is minimal. Furthermore, the adhesive employed on such tapes must be chosen so that it maintains a strong bond with the diaper surfaces (typically plastic) to which the tape is secured. Thus, in attempting to remove a soiled diaper, the parent is faced with the problem of either tearing a strong tape or breaking a strong adhesive bond. It is usually found that two hands and substantial effort are required.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In view of the foregoing, it is a principal object of the present invention to provide a diaper fastener which retains the advantages over safety pins of simplified securing of the diaper to the infant, but which simplifies the task of removing the soiled diaper.

Thus, the invention features a diaper fastener which comprises a primary web itself comprising a first web portion secured to a first diaper portion, a second web portion securable to a second diaper portion, and a reduced strength region of the web intermediate those portions. A reinforcing web is provided and is removably secured to the primary web from a location on the first primary web portion to a location on the second primary web portion. In preferred embodiments of the invention, the primary web comprises a tape including an adhesive on the surface for contact with the diaper, the reduced strength region comprises a line of perforations extending across the primary web or a slit in the primary web, the reinforcing web is secured to the exposed surface of the primary web by an adhesive, and the reinforcing web includes an end portion which is not secured to the primary web, whereby removal of the reinforcing web is facilitated.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING Other objects, features, and advantages of the invention will appear from the following description of preferred embodiments taken together with the accompanying drawings. In the drawings:

FIGS. 1-3 and 5 are perspective views of alternative embodiments of tape units constructed according to the present invention; and

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a soiled diaper as rolled up for disposal.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PARTICULAR PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS In each of the embodiments of FIGS. 1-3, the tape unit includes a primary strip of tape 12 having an adhesive-bearing surface (not visible in the drawing) and a non-adhesive surface 14. By means of the adhesive, a portion 16 of the tape 12 is secured during manufacture to the plastic backing sheet 18 of a conventional disposable diaper. A second portion 20 of the tape 12 is provided for being secured to another portion of the diaper upon application of the diaper to an infant. The adhesive surface of this portion 20 is protected by a release sheet 22 which includes a projecting tab 24 for easy removal of the sheet 22 when desired. The tape 12 includes a region 26 of reduced web strength intermediate the portions 16 and 20 and preferably aligned with, or closely spaced from, the associated lateral edge 28 of the diaper. A reinforcing tape 30 is secured to the non-adhesive surface 14 ofthe tape 12 by means of an adhesive on the surface of the tape 30 which contacts surface 14. (Alternatively, the adhesive could be coated on a portion of surface 14.) The reinforcing tape 30 extends from portion 16, across region 26, to region 20. An end portion 32 of the tape 30 remains unsecured (e.g., as by doubling over the adhesive face of the end portion upon itself) to the underlying surface 14.

Comparing FIGS. 1-3, it will be seen that the region of reduced strength of the tape 12 consists of a line of perforations extending across the width of the tape in FIG. 1, a complete severence of the tape in FIG. 2, and one or more nicks or slits 27 extending partially across the width of the tape from a lateral edge thereof in FIG. 3. Other forms of a reduced strength region are possible, of course. (E.g., a reduced thickness of the tape 12 in the region 26, scoring the tape surface in that region, etc.)

While any form of reduced strength region may be employed, certain forms are particularly suitable for use with tapes of various types. Thus, for tapes which are readily torn once the tear has been initiated (e.g., conventional cloth backed adhesive tape) the scheme of FIG. 3 would be particularly suitable. With such a reduced strength region 26, comprising nicks 27, the reinforcing tape 30 need be wide enough to overlie the nicks. (With all embodiments, however, the width of reinforcing tape 30 may be varied.) The provision of several nicks 27 assures that one will be aligned with the diaper lateral edge 28, and thus be at a suitable tear location, without the necessity of unrealistically accurate placement of the tape units on diapers in high speed manufacturing equipment.

For tapes which are extremely difficult to tear, either because of their composition or thickness, the fully slit embodiment of FIG. 2 may be preferable. The line of perforations in the region 26 of FIG. 1 may be suitable for use with tapes 12 of an intermediate strength. Whatever embodiment employed, the reinforcing tape 30 should be of sufficient strength and width that the composite tape unit 10 has an overall strength comparable to that of conventional single-layer tapes used on infants diapers. The removal of the tape 30 is facilitated by providing a surface 14 of tape 12 which does not as readily accept bonding to the adhesive as does, for example, the plastic sheet 18.

It is possible with certain tapes (e.g., crepe paper tape) to have an easily tearable reinforcing tape 30 which still has sufficient strength to accomplish its re inforcing function. With such a tape the reinforcing tape 30 can be torn, rather than removed, to effect removal of the diaper from an infant.

FIG. 4 illustrates how the reinforcing tapes 30 may serve an additional function in the disposal of a soiled 3 diaper. After removal of the tapes 30 (or tearing through the tapes 30), the soiled diaper 34 can be rolled up as shown in FIG. 4 so that only the plastic backing sheet 18 is exposed. The tapes 30 can then be used to secure the free end of the rolled up diaper to the remainder of the roll. With a tear through type tape 30 one or more of the four resulting tape 30 segments can be peeled off and used to so secure the free end.

In one particularly preferred embodiment the primary tape comprises a plastic tape in which a tear will readily propagate (e.g., polypropylene or Mylar). With such tapes the structure of FIG. 3 is a suitable choice and it has been found that when the reinforcing tape 30 is removed, the tape 12 severs in the region of reduced strength and the diaper opens, merely from the forces produced by the infants movements.

FIG. illustrates another embodiment which is very similar to that of FIG. 1, the only difference being the extension of reinforcing tape 30 to provide a portion 31 which is adhered directly to the plastic sheet 18. With this modification (which is, of course, suitable for incorporation into other basic embodiments) the reinforcing tape 30 can be peeled from the reduced strength region 26 without removal from the diaper as a whole. The tape 30 is still available, of course, for securing the soiled diaper in a rolled up configuration but it need not be separately held, or otherwise kept handy, while the diaper is being rolled.

From the foregoing it will be understood that, according to the present invention, with very minor structural change and increased expense, a tape unit for securing a diaper to an infant can be provided which will render the removal of the diaper as convenient as conventional tape units render securing the diaper.

While particular preferred embodiments of the present invention have been described in detail and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, it will be understood that other embodiments are within the scope of the invention and the following claims.

I claim:

1. A tape unit for a diaper comprising,

a primary tape strip having a first surface coated with an adhesive and a second surface, said first and second surfaces being on opposite sides of said primary tape strip, said first surface having a first portion secured to a first diaper portion and a second portion securable to a second diaper portion for securing the diaper on an infant, said primary tape strip having a region of reduced strength intermediate the first and second tape portions; and

a reinforcing strip removably secured to said primary strip second surface and at least partially covering said region of reduced strength, said reinforcing strip thereby preventing disengagement of the first and second strip portions until removed from the region of reduced strength,

a release sheet removably secured to said second portion on said primary strip first surface whereby separation of said release sheet and said primary strip second portion permits said second portion to be attached to said second diaper portion.

2. The tape unit of claim 1 wherein the reinforcing strip comprises a tape strip having an adhesive in contact with the primary strip.

3. The tape unit of claim 1 wherein the reinforcing strip extends between the first and second primary strip portions.

4. The tape unit of claim 1 wherein said reinforcing strip includes a tab portion which is free of attachment to the primary strip to facilitate removal of the reinforcing strip.

5. The tape unit of claim 1 whrein the width of the reinforcing strip is less than the width of the primary strip.

6. The tape unit of claim I wherein the region of reduced strength comprises a line of perforations in the primary strip extending at least partially across the width of the primary strip.

7. The tape unit of claim 1 wherein the region of reduced strength comprises a slit in the primary strip extending from an edge of the primary strip at least partially across the width of the primary strip.

8. The tape unit of claim 7 wherein said slit extends across the width of the primary strip.

9. The tape unit of claim 7 wherein said slit extends only partially across the width of the primary strip, and said reinforcing strip has a sufficient width to completely overlie said slit.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2095437 *Apr 13, 1936Oct 12, 1937Fox LouisPrice marking tag and method of making the same
US2902734 *Aug 6, 1957Sep 8, 1959Bruce G WaltersNapkin fastening means
US3501365 *Jul 11, 1969Mar 17, 1970Litton Business Systems IncPressure sensitive label strip construction
US3620217 *Mar 18, 1970Nov 16, 1971Procter & GambleDisposable diaper having pressure-sensitive tape fastener and built-in disposal fastener
US3800796 *Apr 13, 1972Apr 2, 1974Jacob EDisposable diaper with semielastic strip fasteners
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3955576 *Apr 21, 1975May 11, 1976Kimberly-Clark CorporationTape fastener system for disposable diapers
US3971380 *May 19, 1975Jul 27, 1976Johnson & JohnsonDisposable diaper having an adhesive closure system and method of construction therefor
US3987793 *Sep 29, 1975Oct 26, 1976Johnson & JohnsonDiaper with tab fastener having backing web and face web
US3989047 *Sep 29, 1975Nov 2, 1976Johnson & JohnsonDiaper with loop-type adhesive fastener
US3989048 *Sep 29, 1975Nov 2, 1976Johnson & JohnsonDiaper with loop-type adhesive fastener releasably secured to diaper facing
US3990449 *Dec 19, 1975Nov 9, 1976Johnson & JohnsonTab fastener having at least two anchoring legs
US3999546 *Dec 19, 1975Dec 28, 1976Johnson & JohnsonDiaper having primary and secondary tab fasteners
US4024867 *Feb 18, 1976May 24, 1977Johnson & JohnsonDisposable diaper with permanently attached adhesive belt fastening means
US4050121 *Jan 10, 1977Sep 27, 1977Avery International CorporationSingle substrate tab fastener
US4389212 *Dec 2, 1981Jun 21, 1983Personal Products CompanyDiaper with potentially elastic tape fastener
US4410326 *Sep 21, 1981Oct 18, 1983Boussac Saint Freres B.S.F.Adhesive-type securing device for disposable diapers, and disposable diaper comprising such a securing device
US4617022 *Jan 25, 1985Oct 14, 1986Beghin-Say S.A.Disposable hygienic article with removable belt
US4643729 *May 16, 1985Feb 17, 1987Beghin-Say S.A.Elastic fasteners for a diaper
US4662875 *Nov 27, 1985May 5, 1987The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent article
US4869724 *Dec 17, 1987Sep 26, 1989The Procter & Gamble CompanyMechanical fastening systems with adhesive tape disposal means for disposable absorbent articles
US4963140 *Dec 17, 1987Oct 16, 1990The Procter & Gamble CompanyMechanical fastening systems with disposal means for disposable absorbent articles
US5053028 *Oct 10, 1989Oct 1, 1991Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyDisposable diaper with improved hook and loop fastener system
US5108384 *Sep 11, 1990Apr 28, 1992The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable absorbent article with combination mechanical and adhesive tape fastener system and having reserve adhesive tape for improved disposability
US5611789 *Mar 8, 1995Mar 18, 1997Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyDisposable diaper mechanical closure system with adhesive disposability
US5776123 *Jul 28, 1993Jul 7, 1998Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Garment with tactile position indicators
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US6296629Jun 2, 1999Oct 2, 2001Kimberly-Clark WorldwideAbsorbent article having an improved fastening system
US6648866 *Nov 26, 2001Nov 18, 2003The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent article fastening device
US6733483Sep 21, 1999May 11, 2004The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent article having positioning indicia
US6736804Dec 21, 1993May 18, 2004The Procter & Gamble CompanyMechanical fastening systems with disposal means for disposable absorbent articles
US6892884 *Jul 18, 2003May 17, 2005Michelle L. FernandezInfant accessory system and method of making the same
US6994698Dec 28, 1994Feb 7, 2006Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Flexible mechanical fastening tab
US7727216 *Jul 3, 2007Jun 1, 2010Unicharm CorporationDiaper for adults
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US7863497Oct 10, 2006Jan 4, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable absorbent article designed to facilitate an easy change
US8475427Oct 27, 2010Jul 2, 2013The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable absorbent article designed to facilitate an easy change
US8492608Jun 28, 2010Jul 23, 2013The Procter And Gamble CompanyDisposable absorbent article designed to facilitate an easy change
US8716548Oct 10, 2006May 6, 2014The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable absorbent article designed to facilitate an easy change
USRE40247Apr 21, 2004Apr 15, 2008The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent article fastening device
EP0048446A1 *Sep 17, 1981Mar 31, 1982BOUSSAC SAINT FRERES B.S.F. Société anonyme dite:Adhesive diaper fastener, and diaper provided with such a fastening device
EP0321234A1 *Dec 15, 1988Jun 21, 1989THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANYMechanical fastening systems with disposal means for disposable absorbent articles
EP0529681A1 *Dec 15, 1988Mar 3, 1993THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANYMechanical fastening systems with disposable means for disposable absorbent articles
WO1981003601A1 *Jun 2, 1981Dec 24, 1981Beghin Say SaElastic fastener for pilch
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Classifications
U.S. Classification24/304, 604/390, 428/136, 428/913, 24/DIG.110, 428/354, 428/41.8
International ClassificationA61F13/49, C09J7/02, A61F13/58, A44B99/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/58, Y10S24/11, Y10S428/913
European ClassificationA61F13/58